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Community Member Credit: vipervadim

Another Project from 2014

6gen brakes swap into 4th gen Maxima that clear 16in rims

I’ve seen plenty of 6th gen brake swaps into 4th/5th gens but I’ve never seen them modified to clear 16in rims.

I have 16s, spring and stuts, I plow through potholes in NYC, I’m never going to drive low and SLOW and avoid all potholes like some others with huge rims and lowered cars. With that being said, I needed bigger brakes to help me SLOW down better.

I already had 11″ 2000 Max rotors and 4 piston wilwood dynalite calipers. Good for 60-0mph stops, but doesn’t fare too well with repeated high speed braking (100mph+). So back to the drawing board I went – The result is this thread

Old brake setup: 2000 Maxima(thicker than 95-99) 11″ rotor with Dynalite 4-piston Wilwoods

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they clear 15s with no problem!

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OLD setup vs New (11″ rotor vs 12.6″ rotor)

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Here’s where the fun begins:

To put 6th gen brakes into a 4th gen you need to enlarge the caliper mounting holes on the spindles.

  • Stock is 12mm
  • Need to enlarge holes to 14mm

So I got spare spindles, drilled them out, replaced wheel bearings, and cut off the heat/splash shields to clear bigger rotor. I mounted the 6gen rotor and caliper to spindle with a wheel spacer to hold it in and test the fitment on 16s.

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It didn’t fit so time to bring out the grinder! I grinded off the following parts of the caliper:

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And then grinded some more and some more…

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And then test fit it…

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And got it down to this…

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Once it cleared without issues I painted them

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Old SS brake lines were all nasty and weathered so: New Goodridge SS brake lines

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I did not need to use wheel spacers – they fit under the rims SO TIIIIIIIIIGHT!!! I love it!!!

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Braking is greatly improved. Had this setup since the end of summer and no rubbing, no issues just good brakes.

How do they compare to the wilwoods?
The wilwoods did have a better initial bite (4 piston clamp vs 1 piston) but when you step on the 6gens they just hold and hold like no tomorrow. Wilwoods would hold until a certain point and then start slipping (rotors gets hot)

For a typical drive around there’s no difference in braking 50-0, but when you push the car hard repeatedly, or braking from high speeds – they perform very well.

Gallery of 350z Track Edition Wheels

 

Member Credit: schmellyfart

Installed a set of the lightweight Millenia wheels today. The main point I want to make is the amount of work needed to get the rear wheels to fit is minimal. I read some old posts making it seem like it was a lot of work and a lot of grinding had to be done.
It was well under a couple minutes of actual sanding/grinding time. I used a Dremel with a sanding drum. The outer lip on the wheel near the centerbore only needs a few thousandths taken off to fit over the rear hub dust caps.

A total of 44lbs lighter then my reinforced (~16lb) rx7 wheels.
205/65R15 on the Millenias 32lb per corner
245/50R16 on the RX7s 43lb per corner

When I had the 225/55R16 on the RX7s, they were about 39-40lbs per corner when brand new.

One thing to note is that the 245s are practially brand new and only have 900 miles on them. And the 205s are maybe 1 or 2/32 from the wear bars. I wasn’t able to weigh the wheels without tires, so there’s a fudge factor of a couple pounds.

And no, I don’t care how bad they look compared to the RX7 wheels. I installed these to see how they affect my fuel economy since I’ve only been getting 25-27mpg with the 3.5.

 

 

 

Gallery of 5thgen Maxima’s with different wheel and tire setups.

Gallery of 6thgen Maxima’s with different wheel and tire setups.

Member Credit: 3hree5ive0ero

I broke yet another wheel stud and instead of paying the dealership $70 to do it, I decided to do it myself this time. I spent $4.04 (for replacement stud) + $1.00 (for 6 washers). This sure beats paying somebody else to do the work and is definitely more gratifying.

Hopefully, this DIY helps you guys who need their wheel stud(s) replaced.

Level of difficulty:
1.5 out of 5 (5 being hardest)

Approximate install time:
45-90 minutes

Tools:
floor jack and jack stands
socket wrench/ratchet
14mm (9/16″) and 19mm (3/4″) sockets
wd-40 or pb blaster or liquid wrench
~6 washers
hammer or mallet

Replacing the wheel stud:
*I did the rear left side. The fronts should involve the same steps, but may or may not require different socket sizes.

1: Jack up the car high enough using the standard jack points (or frame) so you can slide under the car easily.

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2: Remove the wheel, exposing the studs, rotor, brake components, etc.

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3: Locate the two 14mm bolts holding the brake caliper in place and remove them.

*Spraying the bolts with wd-40/pb blaster/liquid wrench makes the job much easier, especially if these bolts have not been removed recently.

**The bottom bolt cannot be taken off due to limited space behind it, so I used my floor jack to push up the suspension to create more space.
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4: Put the bolts some place where the grease won’t collect stuff off the ground.

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5: Rest the brake calipers so that it does not put any strain (put weight on) the brake lines. Take off the brake pads, if you haven’t already.

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Click the image to open in full size.

6: Locate the two 19mm bolts holding the brake caliper bracket in place and remove them.

*Spraying the bolts with wd-40/pb blaster/liquid wrench makes the job much easier, especially if these bolts have not been removed recently.

**I couldn’t take off the bolts by hand so I used the floor jack (while making sure the socket is on the bolt completely as to not strip it).

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

7: Put the bolts some place where you won’t lose them.

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8: Remove the brake caliper bracket and the rotor and set it aside. They should just slide right out.

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9: Spray wd-40/pb blaster/liquid wrench where the broken stud is and around it. Hammer away at the broken stud. (Optional: thread in an old/useless lug nut a little bit for added length and to prevent the stud from flying somewhere)

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10: Take out the broken stud.

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11: Spray the new stud down with wd-40/pb blaster/liquid wrench and put it through the hole where the broken stud was. Place ~6 washers on the stud and tighten the lug nut. Stop tightening when you can feel the head of the stud become flat like the other studs.

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Click the image to open in full size.

12: You’re done! It should look like this.

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13: Now put everything back together in the opposite order that you took them out in.
[self explanatory]