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my4thgen 95-99

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Community Member Credit: saig

  • Check antenna fuse 40 7.5A which supplies 12v to pin 3 at all time.
  • Ground is provided through pin 6 at all time.
  • When stereo is on, trigger signal is sent to pin 4.

If the fuse burnt, there is likely a short in your antenna component.

Community Member Credit: CS_AR

Last night while driving Max IV, the check engine light came on. I suspected it was another Evap system related code. So I go home and plug in my OBD2 scanner. The scanner fails to connect. I had no scanner lights, no scanning, no activity from the reader. Oh great. It seemed like the OBD2 port was dead. It was.

Next I tried the scanner on Max III and it worked as expected. So this is a Max IV specific problem.

To rewind a couple of weeks when I was working on an antenna replacement, I managed to blow a couple of 7.5 fuses in a slot named ELEC PARTS. This fuse is located on the 3rd row from the right at the top. The clock will not function if this fuse is blown. Since I knew I had a blown 7.5 amp fuse, I picked up a 3-pack of fuses a couple of days earlier. I had already planned to replace the fuse to get the clock running this weekend.

Here’s a picture from Kevlo911 that shows the ELEC PARTS fuse location.

Community Member Credit: CS_AR

If your power antenna still works, consider yourself lucky. I have two Nissans with working antennas and two that have been destroyed by a clogged roof drain Y-pipe. The two that were destroyed by water damage happened before I bought the cars. So this is one of those maintenance items that will come back to bite if neglected for too long.

Each fall I like to clean and check roof drains along with coolant maintenance get ready for winter maintenance activities.

Over the years, I’ve replaced the roof drain Y-Pipes with OEM replacements to avoid problems with the roof drain backing up and causing other damage. The problem is the original metal roof drain Y-pipes will rust and clog causing water from the roof drain to back up into the power antenna motor.

Replacing the power antenna motor can be an expensive and/or time consuming task. So I with this thread I want to share a low cost alternative to the metal roof drain Y-Pipe.

Located below the jack mount in right hand side of the trunk is a roof drain Y-Pipe that is intended to vent water from the sunroof and power antenna out behind the right side rear wheel.

Here’s a picture of a clogged and corroded Y-pipe below. This Y-Pipe was so corroded and rusted on the inside that I could not clear the clog using coat hanger wire. Really when the Y-pipe is this bad, there is no point in trying to save it. Just replace it.

Here’s a picture of the Y-pipe and the boot that you will see behind the right rear wheel. The Y-pipe was designed to merge water from the right rear roof vent with the antenna drain and allow it to exit the body cavity just below the jack mount.

This afternoon I went to my local Ace Hardware and purchased a Watts Nylon barbed end splicer and connector.

The Splicer (reducer) is a 1/2 in ID x 3/8 in ID – Part Number PL-427. This works for connecting the roof drain hose to a 3/8 in ID connector – Part Number PL-310

I connected the roof drain hose to the splicer in this picture.

Then I connected the splicer from the roof drain and the antenna drain to the connector T. The connector T will drain out out of the fender cavity through the regular boot that is shown in the 2nd picture. The short tube in the picture connects to the drain on the bottom of the power antenna motor.

Here’s a picture of the new connector T that replaced the original metal Y-Pipe.

I made a final revision to remove the extra hose between the connector T and the splicer in the picture below. I wanted the two barbed ends to touch inside the hose.

Here’s a picture of the hose clamp that I added to the antenna drain nipple. I had problems with the hose coming loose from the antenna after installation. It won’t come loose now.

I hope this post saves a club member’s 4th gen the damage that a corroded metal Y-pipe can cause.

Cheers!

Community Member Credit: gtrrider

Basing our review on a 1995 Nissan Maxima, this application for years has been in great need of a taillight upgrade that did not take away from the car but gave it a very classy and sensual look. Despite the “demand” for the atrocious looking Altezza taillights on the market, Custommaxima has conjured up a way of bringing back the o-so-wonderful Clear/Red Taillights which until now have been sported by only a select few who could get their hands on them. Being that we were one of the lucky ones to have a set on hand we will be testing these new CE Taillights up against an old and sought-after rival “David L Clear/Reds”.

Here is what CustomMaxima (a CustomEnterprise group) had to say about this product, Our customers have been asking for red and clear taillights for their 1995-1996 Maximas and we answered. Now you can eliminate the orange turn signal found on stock taillights and replace it with our new red and crystal clear tails. Sold as a 4 piece set replacing your trunk lights also. The trunk lights need to be replaced as our new lights have a crystal look to them on the clear lens and not the “cloudy white” clear lens found on the factory backup lens. We are sure you will be pleased with the excellent fitment and superb quality of this product. Installation is easy as we include all necessary bulbs and wiring harnesses”. We shall see about that.. read on

Our Take:

With an almost 11yr old car, lighting equipment is certainly looking dated and not appealing to the more modern style lighting equipment. There is noticeable differences with this new system in that there is a reflective diamond-like backing to better illuminate the housing and also provide a better light output when reversing. Not only is the reflective backing more esthetically pleasing to look at but they also provide the brake light area with a much darker and pronounced red glow when the brakes are applied and when the parking lights are illuminated. These new light assemblies are also prepared with a nice but could be better-applied weather-stripping around the outer edge for those times when you do not need water entering your trunk compartment. Most aftermarket taillight assemblies are lacking very important details such as reflective material which is used to draw passing motorists away from the vehicle if you happen to park on the side of the road. This is a safety requirement, and we give a thumbs-up to CE for adding these to their product. Lastly, a key difference between the CE Taillight and the Factory (David L) is that the rear backing is completely redesigned, which may not be for the better.

Pros:

  • Crystal clean look
  • Crisp Red color for brake lights
  • Smooth Installation
  • Chrome bulb standard for turning signal (lights amber)

Cons:

  • Possible seal problem
  • Requires purchasing new bulb for side reflectors
  • Fragile plastic posts may break while securing to car
  • Possible wiring issue, check for breakage in ground before installing.
  • Factory bolts not exactly made to fit these

Application:

  • 95-96 Nissan Maxima’s

Additional Note:

  • 2825 (W5W Bulbs) for side reflectors

Part Number Information:*

  • 95-96 Maxima Red/Clear Taillights
  • 9596RCT
  • $199

Tools Required for Installation:

  • Sockets and Wrenches
  • Short and Long Extensions
  • Flat-head screwdriver
  • Patience

Materials Provided for Installation:

  • 2 Outer Taillights
  • 2 Inner Taillights
  • 2 Mirror Chrome Turn Signal Bulbs
  • 4 Wiring Harnesses

Removal/Installation Process: Outer Taillights

Removal is quite easy with basic tools. Before you begin, we would like to emphasize that the key should be out of the ignition before removal/installation with the parking/driving lights in the off position. Going against this advisor could lead to electrical short, or much worse. ALWAYS CHECK ALL POWER IS OFF BEFORE WORKING!

To begin locate the tabs which hold in the trunk lining to the body of the car, remove these with a flathead screw driver, they should come out fairly easily. Remove both side linings to give you space to work on the taillights. When removed they should expose to you the rear end of the taillight housing, locate the four(4) bolts on each end. Two of the 4bolts are hidden underneath the hanger holding the wiring harness after removing the yellow wire hangers from the inner two(2) bolts. Disconnect all wiring from the back of the housing and proceed to remove. Removing the taillight itself is quite the task, so my suggestion to you is to work each corner one at a time pushing as hard as you can from the inside out without damaging anything.

Installation is the reverse of installation, but we will not be using the backing plate of the OEM taillights, we are given a new harness which for some very strange reason has a different sized side marker bulb then what the factory comes with, which we aren’t supplied. When mounting the new CE assembly make sure to keep watch of surrounding seal so that it seals tightly into place for water not to reach inside your trunk compartment. Although possible it is very hard to maneuver the very loosely applied weather-strip to seal properly, I would recommend laying the light in place, and then pushing in the strip while someone secures the screws (factory screws are not exactly made to fit on these) so we would recommend CE supplying new bolts/washers to fit these. Make sure not to over tighten these bolts to the assembly as they are very weak and can easily break if too much pressure is applied *hint*strengthen posts*hint*.

Removal/Installation Process:

To begin locate the four(4) bolts on each end of the tail light, unbolt all and disconnect all wiring from the back of the housing and proceed to remove. These lights are very tight and uneasy to manage, so if you can try and wedge a wrapped flat head screwdriver between the trunk and the tail light and slowly pry the two apart. Sure enough, the light will slowly come apart from the trunk and you are on your way to replacing the new CE light in its place. Installation is the reverse of the removal, but as with the outer lights we will not be using the factory backing plate, but the supplied CE plate. Final Product: Make sure all mounting points are secured properly, all harnesses connected fully, turn the lights on and enjoy.

Member Credit: Rob

1. General Overview

If you can install a car alarm, you can install this kit. However, if you make a mistake, it may render your car undriveable. Please take your time and following all the test procedures listed in the installation guide.

Disclaimer: Because this is a do it yourself modification, I will not be responsible for either the INSTALLATION, USE, or FUNCTION of this kit. Proceed with caution and at your own risk. This kit is for OFF-ROAD use only.
1.1 Kit Contents

The kit includes:

* A. Manumatic Controller Box
* B. Power Cable
* C. Control Cable (7 ft)
* D. Relay Module
* E. Remote LED Display and Cable (optional, 7ft)

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 1. Kit Contents

1.2 Equipment Needed

* philips screwdriver
* wire cutter / wire stripper
* electrical tape
* solder gun and solder
* double sided tape

You must solder all wire connections for solid contacts.

1.3 Connector Locations

There are only 2 areas of the car where we need to perform wire cutting and splicing.

The first area is the ASCD Connector (M30). The ASCD connector is out in the open, located near the driver’s right knee (shown below).

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 2. ASCD Connector

The second area is the TCM Connectors. For the 1998-1999 Maxima, there are 2 TCM Connectors (F109 and F108, shown in Figure 3a below). The TCM Connectors are accessible by removing the ashtray assembly. F109 is on the left and F108 is on the right.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 3a. TCM Connectors in 1998-1999 Maxima (F109 on left, F108 on right)

For the 1995-1997 Maxima, there is only 1 TCM Connector (protected by a bolt shown in Figure 3b below). The TCM Connector is accessible by removing the ashtray assembly. Thanks go to Eric W. for tracking down the following images and diagrams.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 3b. TCM Connector in 1995-1997 Maxima

1.4 Kit Layout

The following diagram shows the recommend layout of the kit’s components.

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Figure 4. Kit Layout

The Manumatic Controller Box is placed under the driver’s seat. The Relay Module is taped to the inside of the dash. Where to put the optional “Remote LED Display” is left up to you.

1.5 Wire Colors

The following table shows color codes used to represent different wire colors.
B = Black
W = White
R = Red
G = Green
L = Blue
Y = Yellow
G = Light Green
BR = Brown
OR = Orange
P = Pink
PU = Purple
GY = Gray
Figure 5. Wire Colors

When the wire color is striped, the base color is given first, followed by the stripe color as shown below:
Example: L/W = Blue with White Stripe

1.6 Wire Modifications

We will be making wire connections in 2 different ways: tapping and highjacking.

Tapping a wire involves the addition of a new wire to an existing wire. The existing wire must NOT be cut. The following diagram shows a before and after picture.

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Figure 6. Tapping an Existing Wire

Highjacking a wire involves the cutting of the existing wire and attaching 2 new wires to the cut ends. The following diagram shows a before and after picture.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 7. Highjacking an Existing Wire


2.0 Installation

The installation should take you one day. The instructions will start by asking you to remove/loosen interior trim pieces to bring the work areas into view. Try to get to know where the wires and components will go before installing anything. During the installation, there will be tests which you should run to help verify proper installation. Install the Remote LED Display last in case you run out of daylight (since it’s optional).

2.1 Accessing the TCM Connectors

Start by removing the shifter trim and then the ashtray assembly (shown in figure below).

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Figure 8. Dash Trim Removal

Lift the shifter trim and then pull it towards you. Remove the power plug for the cigarette lighter and set the shifter trim aside. Remove the single screw holding the ashtray assembly in place. Pull the ashtray assembly out (it’s now held in place by 1 clip on the right side). Remove the ashtray light plug and then set the ashtray aside.

The TCM should now be visible. Unplug the TCM connector(s) (see Figures 9a and 9b shown below). We will connect wires to these connectors later. If your hands are too big or if you are claustrophobic, then remove the stereo for more space to work in.

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Figure 9. TCM Connectors in 1998-1999 Maxima (F109 on left, F108 on right)

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 9. TCM Connector in 1995-1997 Maxima

2.2 Loosen Center Console

You only need to loosen the center console to run the cables from under the driver’s seat to the dash. Start by removing the top 2 screws on the center console (shown below).

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Figure 10. Center Console Screws – Top Front

Next, remove the 2 screws in the back of the center console (1 on either side).
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Figure 11. Center Console Screws – Bottom Rear

2.3 Install Cables

Try to visualize where all the wires and components will go before installing cables.

When you are ready to begin, locate the controller (yellow), display (blue), and power (red/black) cables (see Figure 1). Each cable should have a connector on one end and bare wires on the other end.

Start by placing the connector end of all 3 cables under the driver’s seat. Route the cables under the seat rail into the center console. Tie the cables so that moving the seat does not cut the wires.

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Figure 12. Put Cable Connectors Under Driver’s Seat

Next, route the cables along the center console towards the dash (shown in the following 2 pictures). Tie the cables to the existing wires running along the center console.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 13. Route Cables Through The Center Console Towards The Dash

The power cable ends in the dash where we will, later, connect it to the cigarette lighter.

Route the remote LED display cable (blue) through the dash and out the back of the dash (towards the gas pedal). We will mount the remote LED display last.

The controller cable (yellow) splits at the dash. Some wires will stay in the dash (for connection to TCM and relay module) while the rest will go through the back of the dash (for connection to ASCD).

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Figure 14. Yellow Cable Split

Splitting from the yellow cable is a 3 pin connector. This will be connected to the relay module. Also splitting from the yellow cable are 2 wires (green, white/green) which will be connected to the TCM. Route the remainder of the yellow cable through the back of the dash. These wires will be connected to the ASCD control unit.

2.3 Connect ASCD Wires

The following diagram shows the ASCD connector, as-is. On this connector, we are only interested in 3 wires (pin 1 – Accel, pin 2 – Coast, pin 4 – Cruise). Make sure you identify the wires by both its color code and its relative location to other wires.

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Figure 15. ASCD Connector Pinout

First, locate the green/orange “Accel” wire (pin 1 of ASCD connector). Next, locate the orange/white wire in the yellow control cable. We will tap into the “Accel” wire by connecting the orange/white wire to the green/orange wire (show below). Be sure to solder all connections together.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 16. Modified ASCD Connector

In a similar fashion, we will tap into the “Coast” wire (pin 2 of ASCD connector) by connecting the orange wire from the control cable to the green/yellow wire.

Finally, tap into the “Cruise” wire (pin 4 of ASCD connector) by connecting the blue wire from the control cable to the green/white wire.

2.4 Connect Relay Module Wires

Start by unplugging the wires connected to the relay module (shown in figure below). We will connect these wires to the TCM. Later, we will plug the connector end back into the relay module.

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Figure 17. Relay Module Wires

For 1998-1999 Maximas, follow the instructions in section 2.4.1. For 1995-1997 Maximas, follow the instructions in section 2.4.2.

2.4.1 Connect Relay Module Wires to 1998-1999 Maxima

The following diagram shows connector F109, as-is. On this connector, we are only interested in 3 wires (pin 26, 27, and 34). Make sure you identify the wires by both its color code and its relative location to other wires.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 18. F109 Connector Pinout

Locate the Yellow/Blue wire on F109 (pin 34). Now locate the green wire and the yellow wire on the relay cable. We will highjack pin 34 with these 2 wires. Start by cutting the Yellow/Blue wire (pin 34). Connect the green wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the yellow wire to the half going towards the TCM (F109).

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Figure 19. Modified F109 Connector

In a similar fashion, we will highjack pin 26 on F109 (Purple/White). Start by cutting the Purple/White pin 26 wire. Connect the brown wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the black wire to the half going towards the TCM (F109).

Lastly, highjack pin 27 on F109 (Pink/Black). Start by cutting the Pink/Black pin 27 wire. Connect the orange wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the red wire to the half going towards the TCM (F109).

2.4.2 Connect Relay Module Wires to 1995-1997 Maxima

The following diagram shows the TCM connector, as-is. For now, we are only interested in 3 wires (pin 16, 17, and 18). Make sure you identify the wires by both its color code and its relative location to other wires.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 18. TCM Connector Pinout for 1995-1997 Maxima

Locate the Yellow/Blue wire (pin 18). Now locate the green wire and the yellow wire on the relay cable. We will highjack pin 18 with these 2 wires. Start by cutting the Yellow/Blue wire (pin 18). Connect the green wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the yellow wire to the half going towards the TCM.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 19. Modified TCM Connector Pinout for 1995-1997 Maxima

In a similar fashion, we will highjack pin 16 (Purple/White). Start by cutting the Purple/White pin 16 wire. Connect the brown wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the black wire to the half going towards the TCM.

Lastly, highjack pin 17 (Pink/Black). Start by cutting the Pink/Black pin 17 wire. Connect the orange wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the red wire to the half going towards the TCM.

2.5 Connect Remaining TCM Wires

We only need 2 more wires on the TCM connector(s). For 1998-1999 Maximas, see section 2.5.1. For 1995-1997 Maximas, see section 2.5.2.
2.5.1 Connect Remaining TCM Wires on 1998-1999 Maxima

The following diagram shows the F108 connector, as-is. On this connector, we are only interested in 2 wires, pins 13 and 22. Make sure you identify the wires by both its color code and its relative location to other wires.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 20. F108 Connector Pinout

First, locate pin 13 on F108 (White wire). Next, locate the Green/White wire from the yellow control cable. We will tap into the pin 13 by connecting the green/white wire to the white wire (show below).

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 21. Modified F108 Connector

In a similar fashion, we will tap into pin 22 on F108 (Green/Yellow) by connecting the green wire from the control cable to it. Be sure to solder all connections together.

2.5.2 Connect Remaining TCM Wires on 1995-1997 Maxima

The following diagram shows the next 2 wires on the TCM connector that we will be working on (pins 3 and 39). Make sure you identify the wires by both its color code and its relative location to other wires.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 20. Original OD Wires on TCM Connector for 1995-1997 Maxima

First, locate pin 3 (White wire). Next, locate the Green/White wire from the yellow control cable. We will tap into the pin 13 by connecting the green/white wire to the white wire (show below).

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 21. Modified OD Wires on TCM Connector for 1995-1997 Maxima

In a similar fashion, we will tap into pin 39 (Green/Yellow) by connecting the green wire from the control cable to it. Be sure to solder all connections together.

2.6 Connect Power Wires

Only 2 more wires to go. Locate the cigarette plug which we discounted earlier.

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Figure 22. Cigarette Plug

We’ll tap power and ground from this plug (connector). Locate the supplied power cable (red and black wire). Connect the red wire from the power cable to the Orange/Black cable in the cigarette plug. Connect the black wire from the power cable to the Black cable in the cigarette plug.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 23. Modified Cigarette Plug

2.7 Connect the Relay Module

Plug the relay module into the matching 6 pin connector that you wired in section 2.4. Plug the 3 pin connector on the relay module into the matching 3 pin connector on the yellow control cable. Use some double sided tape to hold the relay module to the inside of the dash.

This is a good time to make sure your car still works as before. First, tie down all the cabling and set the center console in its normal place so that nothing interferes with the gearshifter. Plug the F108, F109, and the ASCD connectors back into their normal place. Start the car and check that the “D”, “2”, and “1” gear positions still work as before.

2.8 Test For Power

Let’s first check for proper power up of the manumatic controller box. Connect the power cable to the Manumatic Controller.

Turn the ignition to the ON position (but do not start the car). Make sure the RED led on the Manumatic Controller box turns on (has power).

2.9 Connecting Everything and Final Testing

Connect the yellow controller cable to the yellow connector on the manumatic controller box. Next, connect blue remote LED display cable to the blue connector on the controller box. For now, just leave the LED display somewhere visible to you while you are driving. Leave the controller box under the seat.

We are now ready to perform more tests. The following test will check to make sure the manumatic can cycle through the gears.

1. Make sure the gearshifter is in “Park”. Turn the ignition to the ON position (but do not start the car). The remote LED display should be OFF.
2. Press the middle button on the cruise cluster located on your steering wheel. The remote LED should still be OFF.
3. Put the Gear Selector in Drive (you will need to push the brake pedal in order to move the gear selector out of park). The remote LED should still be OFF.
4. Press the middle button on the cruise cluster located on the steering wheel. The remote LED should turn ON (displaying the number 3). Note that the OD OFF light in your instrument cluster should be ON.
5. Press the down button (bottom button on the cruise cluster). The remote LED should now display the number 2. Keep pressing the down button until the display cycles to 1. It should not go lower than 1. Note that the OD OFF light should still be ON.
6. Press the up button (top button on the cruise cluster). The remote LED should count up from 1 to 4. When you reach 4, the OD OFF light should turn OFF.
7. Press the middle button again. The remote LED display should turn OFF.
8. Put the gearshifter in “Park”, turn the ignition OFF, and remove the key.

If you pass the above test, then we’ll check that the manumatic is properly disabled when the gearshifter is not in Drive or when cruise control is ON.

1. Turn the ignition to the ON position (but do not start the car). The remote LED display should be OFF.
2. Put the Gear Selector in Drive (you will need to push the brake pedal in order to move the gear selector out of park). The remote LED should still be OFF.
3. Press the middle button on the cruise cluster located on the steering wheel. The remote LED should turn ON.
4. Shift the gear selector out of “Drive”, the remote LED should turn OFF.
5. Press the middle button again. The remote LED display should still be OFF.
6. Shift the gear selector back to “Drive”.
7. Press the middle button again. The remote LED display should turn ON.
8. Press the “Cruise On” button located on your dash (next to the security LED). The remote LED display should turn OFF.
9. Press the middle button again. The remote LED display should still be OFF.
10. Put the gearshifter in “Park”, turn the ignition OFF, and remove the key.

If you pass the above test, then you’re ready for a real driving test. Cautiously drive the car, in auto mode, to an empty parking lot or open space. From there, turn on manual mode and check for the following:

1. When in 1, the car does not shift up to 2,3,4 no matter what rpm.
2. When in 2, the car does not shift up to 3,4 no matter what rpm. Note that the car may shift down to 1 if going too slow.
3. When in 3, the car does not shift up to 4 no matter what rpm. Note that the car may shift down to 1,2 if going too slow.

Functionally, you’re done. From now on, you the buttons on the steering wheel to change gear selections when in manumatic mode. Do not use the gearshifter button (OD OFF) when in manumatic mode. It took me a few days to get used to keeping my right hand on the steering wheel.

2.10 Mounting the Optional Remote LED Display

The only thing left at this point is to mount the optional “Remote LED Display”. This step has been left to you to decide because your choice of where to install it determines the difficultly level.

Mounting the display inside the instrument cluster is the most difficult. Cheston has an excellent guide on how to access the instrument cluster.
How to Install Indiglo Dash Gauges

2.11 Maintenance

The only thing that may need replacement is the fuse located along the power cable. If it’s blown, replace it with a similar sized .5 amp 12v fuse. If it blows constantly, there maybe a problem with your car or with the manumatic controller.

3.0 Manumatic Operation

This modification gives older Maximas a “manumatic mode” similar to that found on newer cars. It’s a pretty simple concept and it’s operation is described below:

* Manumatic Mode is only available while the gearshifter is in “Drive” and the Cruise Control is OFF.
* Manumatic Mode is automatically turned OFF and disabled when you leave “Drive” or turn Cruise Control ON.
* Manumatic Mode reuses the cruise cluster buttons on your steering wheel to change gear selections.
* The middle button on the cruise cluster turns the manumatic on and off. The top button shifts up. The bottom button shifts down.
* Car will not shift into a higher gear than the gear displayed by the manumatic. For example, when it displays “2”, the car will not shift to 3 or 4.
* Car may shift into a lower gear than the gear displayed by the manumatic. For example, when it displays “2”, the car may shift to 1 if you are going too slow.
* You car will continue to work in auto mode, as before, if you remove the manumatic controller box (or if it loses power).

There’s not much to it when it comes to operation. Here’s more information I posted on maxima.org:

I’m glad other people are interested. I mainly did this
for myself and I spent a lot of time on the design. The main
criterias were:


SAFETY:

1. If the board loses power or is disconnected, your car’s auto
mode still works unchanged.

2. MMode is only available in “D” (you can toggle it on or off
at the steering wheel). If you shift out of “D”, then MMode is
automatically turned off and disabled.

3. If you turn on Cruise control, MMode is automatically turned off and disabled.

4. Shifting to a lower gear than your speed/engine allows will
result in a delayed shift, rather than your tranny dropping to the
ground (gears include 1,2,3,4).


KISS (keep it simple stupid):

5. Minimize the number of wires needed to installed and places
where you need to install them. Basically, you splice/highjack:
– 5 wires in the TCM connector (accessible behind the cigarette tray)
– 3 wires in the ASCD connector (out in the open, near your right knee)
– and finally, 12v and ground (which I take from the cigarette lighter)


STOCK LOOK (no radio shack switches poking out everywere)

6. Reuses existing cruise control buttons when in “D” and when cruise
is OFF. Middle button toggles MMode on/off. Top button goes up in
gear and bottom button goes down in gear. When cruise is on, buttons
act as normal cruise control buttons (MMode is automatically turned off
and disabled when cruise control is on).

7. The remote LED display is optional. You don’t have to have it.
If you want it, you can place it anywhere. Putting it in the instrument
cluster is the most stock looking but quick frankly, that was the hardest
part of the install.

Basically, MMode shifts the gear selector and controls OD for you.
No more accidental shifts into neutral. No more looking at the gear
selector to see where it is. No more micromanaging of “OD Off” button.

Here’s an example use:
– start car
– select “D” with existing gear selector
– drive somewhere
– press middle button to turn MMode on (Remote LED turns on)
– press down, up, down, down, up, up, etc…
– press middle button again to turn MMode off (Remote LED turns off)

Remember, changing the gear selector out of “D” or turning on Cruise
will turn off and disable MMode.

Read more: http://my4thgen.org/showthread.php?t=177#ixzz4VDZuUCaa

Community Member Credit: gtrrider

Basing our review on a 1995 Nissan Maxima, this application seems best for such a product in terms of providing restoration of needed grounding points and also slightly dressing up the engine bay. ActiveTuning prides themselves on this kit because it has been slightly revised recently with some added improvements ranging from: 1666 High Strand Count High Temp Resistance Wiring, 24k Gold Plated Terminals for insured conductivity between the connections, double crimping on each terminal for a secure/safe connection and lastly Stainless Steel hardware (bolts and such) which they insure will not rust what-so-ever. With all those things aside, let us get to what we do best. Thanks again to David at AT for providing us with this opportunity.

Our Take:

With an almost 11yr old car, grounding points tend to be slightly less conductive then they were back in 1995. With this Active Tuning Grounding kit we have essentially brought back the capabilities that the electronics of the car once had. There is a noticeable difference in the shifting habits of our transmission, being smooth up-shifts and also a crisp downshift. Nighttime driving in terms of the headlight performance has increased significantly from what it used to be, giving off more than enough light output that is required and also illuminating the interior slightly brighter than usual. Windows of course roll up a bit quicker and also cranking the car takes little to no effort from the starter. All in all, we rate this an excellent product.

Pros:

  • Stronger & Faster Starts
  • More Responsive Acceleration
  • Superior build quality
  • Smoother Idle
  • Smoother Shifting w/ Automatic Transmission

Cons:

  • Mounting points shown on AT’s website aren’t possible/best

Application:

  • 95-01 Nissan Maxima’s
  • 96-01 Infiniti I30s

Part Number Information:

  • 95-01 Nissan Maxima Grounding Kit
  • NI-MX-95GRNDKT
  • $40

Tools Required for Installation:

  • Sockets and Wrenches
  • Short and Long Extensions
  • Emery paper, grinder, or Dremel to clean grounding locations for good contact
  • Materials Provided for Installation:
  • 4 Ground Cables 10″, 12″, 14″, 15″
  • 2 M6 Bolts
  • 2 M6 Flat Washers
  • 1 M6 Nut

Installation Process: Grounding Motor to Chassis (1)

Installation is quite easy with basic tools. Before you begin, we would like to emphasize that the motor should be cool before preceding. Going against this advisor could lead to burns to the skin, body. ALWAYS ALLOW THE MOTOR TO COOL BEFORE STARTING!

To begin, locate the already existent grounding point on the passenger side of the engine compartment located just below the headlight assembly. You may position your grounding wire (15″) at this point or to the very right of it in the second already existent ground point.* The other end should snake through and with the provided bolt secure it to the open hole in the front of the valve cover. Use wire ties provided accordingly as this wire is located close to the radiator fans which are operating at very high speeds.

Installation Process: Grounding Battery/Motor(2) to Chassis

Disconnect your Negative terminal from the battery, and proceed to fit one end of the grounding wire (10″) in the sequence, and then secure the other end of the wire to the chassis preferably using an existing bolt. Reconnect and secure your negative terminal and proceed to the next grounding point. The next grounding point is back over on the Passenger side of the engine compartment near the motor mount. While using the same grounding point on the chassis as our first wire, secure the other end of the 12″ grounding wire just behind the a/c line on the motor. Use wire ties provided as this wire is located near the pulley assembly which is rotating at incredible speeds.

Installation Process: Grounding Motor to Chassis (3)

Last and certainly not least, you are going to secure the final grounding wire (14″) to the top mounting bolt located in the center of the Intake Plenum. To get to this you are going to need some finesse but it will work out perfectly in the end. Secure one end of your grounding wire to this bolt, underneath the bracket, and secure. Mount the other end of the wire just below the black canister shown in the third picture to the protruding screw on the firewall with the nut supplied.*

*Picture shows different locations from the description but are later routed how it is explained here.

Make sure all mounting points are secured properly, take the car for a spin, and enjoy. 🙂

 

Community Member Credit: swatspyder

For anyone that may dispute the “gains” from doing this mod. gains will only be seen/felt if your stock/current ground wiring is shot, corroded and/or outdated. Long story short. I went out and bought some Streetwires UFX4 Clear power wire from Magnolia Hi-Fi, 9ft of it to be exact. So I cut it to the lengths provided in the installation tutorial (photos included).

Bought some generic stainless steel terminals (4AWG) and crimped them myself. Cost, $19.00 for wire, about $9.00 for terminals, already had necessary tools for the job. $28.00 compared to $50.00, definitely better, but it does take time.  About 1.5 hours for preparing and installing the wires if you custom make them.

Benefits that I can tell right away. Stock speakers KICK now haha, but really, they sound a lot better, much clearer lows and better mid/high range. Headlights and all other lights are MUCH brighter! Windows roll up/down faster.

These are the wire lengths for the 98 maxima according to activetuning:

  • 14″ grounding cable from the negative battery terminal to the chassis
  • 16″ cable is installed from the cylinder head empty M6 threaded hole near the dipstick to the chassis
  • 12″ cable runs from the timing cover harness bracket bolt to the chassis ground
  • 15″ cable is installed from the firewall to the intake

As for the other stuff…

  • Increased Horse Power & Torque
  • Awesome Looks
  • Faster Shifts on Automatics
  • Improved Mileage
  • Reduced Emissions
  • Stronger & Faster Starts
  • Smoother Idle
  • More Responsive Acceleration <~~ noticed a difference right away
  • Reduced Audio Noise
  • Improved Electrical Accessory Performance (brighter lights, windows/sunroofs operate faster, better radio reception, etc.)

 

Community Member Credit: KRRZ350 / MrCurst

Step 1: Remove #1 coil/plug and position #1 cylinder at TDC on the compression stroke.

Step 2: Remove upper half of engine mount and anything else that might get in the way of step 3

Step 3: Remove tensioner inspection cover.

Step3: Compress and lock the tensioner, then remove it.

Step 4: Using a 19mm socket, rotate the crankshaft counterclockwise until you hear the chain skip a tooth.

Step 5: Re-install everything and verify correct ignition timing and vacuum reading

This only applies if you skipped timing upon initial cranking, and only if it skipped on the crank sprocket, but I believe that’s where it skips every time.

Additional Notes:

  • If the chain jumped some teeth, the ONLY way to fix it is by removing the outer timing chain cover, setting the engine to TDC, removing the chain, then set your camshaft gears to the proper timing marks, make sure you are still at TDC, and reinstall the chain and check the alignment against the FSM. You can not adjust your engine timing with the cover and chain still on.
  • The Cam Position sensor controls fuel injection timing. Both crank position sensors control ignition timing.
  • If your chain has jumped a few teeth, I doubt the motor would even run and you should be throwing CEL codes for both cam and crank sensors and they would definitely be out of phase.
  • Indeed. 99% of the time if the chain jumps, it won’t run. However, if it goes one tooth off (I forget on which of the sprockets), it’ll run, just without cylinders 2 and 3.

Community Member Credit: mpvibes

So, I decided to go ahead and do the dreaded water pump replacement job on my EDIT: 263,000 mile 4th gen. What a PITA! I had to do it the long way because #1 I had a leak on my timing chain cover and # 2 I wanted to make sure my timing was accurate and my car didn’t jump timing, bend any valves, etc. Well, since it was my first time ever doing this job, it took me 2 days and I did learn a lot. Man, my oil pan and all my timing chain components were covered in oil sludge, it was ugly I had to do a lot of cleaning, using gasoline! Well, here are some pics that I wanted to share with you all. Sorry for some of the crappy pics…

UPDATE: When cleaning and putting on the lower oil pan just get a NEW Felpro oil pan gasket and follow the tightening sequence! Do not put RTV silicone on there. I had a leak and had to get a Felpro gasket.

New Nissan Water Pump

Oil sludge all over timing components

Broke the old water pump while taking it out

Cleaned and looking good!

Old Thermostat and New Thermostat side by side

Owner: HarrisH

Year: 1997
Model: Maxima
Color: 3-Stage Metallic Red Paint
Transmission: Built 4-Speed Automatic
Trim: SE

Mod List:

Engine Performance:

  • VQ35 Swap with ’00 VI and Pathfinder Throttle Body
  • Bulletproof Transmission with Stage III Valve body and Transmission Cooler
  • Stillen Catback
  • Cattman Headers
  • Cattman Short Ram Intake
  • FSTB
  • RSB
  • Optima Red Top Battery

Wheels/Suspension/Handling:

  • 18″ Lightweight 5zigen Wheels
  • Pirelli P-Zero Nero Tires
  • J30 Painted Calipers
  • Brembo X-Drilled Brembo Rotors

Interior/Audio/Electronics:

  • Whelen Police Siren (Switches Inside)
  • 6 Whelen Police Strobes (Switches Inside)
  • Eclipse NAV AVN 5482
  • Rockford Fosgate Subs 12″ X 2
  • Rainbow Amp
  • Rainbow Components
  • Rainbow Rear Speakers
  • Full Black Leather Interior
  • Custom LEDS on all Controls
  • Proximity Sensor
  • 791XV Alarm System

Exterior:

  • Stillen Front Lip
  • OEM Sunroof
  • 3-Stage Metallic Red Paint
  • VIS CF Hood
  • Clear Corners
  • 8000K Phillips HID Kit
  • M3 Lip on Trunk
  • Sarona Molded Bodykit
  • Sparco Red Hoodpins
  • Z3 Fenders
  • OEM 97-99 Headlights
  • Hyperwhite Polarg Bulbs