Category

my4thgen 95-99

Category

Member Credit: sdot82

This write-up is for a 2000-01 VI manifold swap on to 95-99 Maxima. There are many ways to do this swap so first I will number the ways I know how to do this and then go into detail on how to do it. There are a couple of different Upper manifolds you can get Fed spec. or Cali Spec the difference is one may not have the swirl valve control (don’t need it anyway). I believe (don’t quote me on this) that the 00 Fed Spec do not have the swirl valve control and all 01 (Fed and Cali) do not have the hole for the EGR guide tube. You may want to ask the People from the Junkyard this because you want to know this if you are going to keep the EGR or not.

(note when I say 00 that means both 2000-2001 unless I specifically say otherwise for that part)

  1. 00 Upper and Lower (Fed spec), 00 Fuel rail & injectors or 01 QX4 fuel rail & injectors (they are the same because I am using the QX4 fuel rail and inj.), 00 Throttle Body w/ 00 IACV, 00 EGR guide tube. (no adaptors needed for this)
  2. 00 Upper and Lower (Fed or Cali), 00 Fuel R&Inj. Or 01 QX4 Fuel R&Inj, 00 TB w/ 00 IACV, and running no EGR. (Make a plate to cover the hole in the manifold)
  3. 00 Upper and Lower, 00 Fuel R&Inj or 01 QX4 Fuel R&Inj, 00 TB w 4th gen IACV (need a adaptor plate made for the 4th gen IACV), and 00 EGR guide tube or no EGR (need to make a plate to cover the hole)
  4. 00 Upper and Lower, 00 Fuel R&Inj or 01 QX4 Fuel R&Inj, Pathfinder TB (need a adaptor plate made) 4th gen IACV (need a adaptor plate made), and 00 EGR guide tube or no EGR (need to make a plate to cover the hole).
  5. 00 Upper and Lower, 00 Fuel R&Inj or 01 QX4 Fuel R&Inj, 4th gen TB (need a adaptor plate made) 4th gen IACV (need a adaptor plate made), and 00 EGR guide tube or no EGR (need to make a plate to cover the hole).
  6. 00 Upper and 4th gen Lower, 4th gen Fuel R&Inj, 00 TB w/ 00 IACV, and 00 EGR guide Tube or no EGR (need to make a plate to cover the hole).
  7. 00 Upper and 4th gen lower, 4th gen Fuel R&Inj, 4th gen TB, 4th gen IACV, 00 EGR guide tube or no EGR.
  8. 00 Upper and 4th gen lower, 4th gen Fuel R&Inj, Pathfinder TB, 4th gen IACV, 00 EGR guide tube or no EGR (need to make a plate to cover the hole).

I think those are all the different ways that u can do the swap parts wise. In addition to those parts listed above you need to get:

  • a lot of new hoses (different sizes), some fittings and tees.
  • hose clamps
  • new gaskets for the 00 lower, the upper should not need new gaskets since they are rubber (unless they are torn)
  • Bolts for the upper manifold (8 of them) unless it came with it, should be able to reuse the lower manifold’s bolts.
  • New bolts for the VIAS back cover (metal cover) and the vacuum switch (just a suggestion because you might have to take it off later and the OEM screws strip easy).
  • Bolts for the 00 TB, if you are going with the 4th gen or Pathy TB you will have to find out from the person you get the adapter plates from what bolts are needed.
  • Adapter Plates for 4th gen TB, 4th gen IACV, or Pathy TB
  • Cover Plates for EGR or 00 IACV (explain later)
  • JB weld the liquid type and JB weld Stick
  • New different PCV w/hoses

Tools:

  • Dremel or grinder
  • socket set (deep as well as regular) you will mainly use 14mm, 12mm, 11mm, 10mm so get those in deep socket.
  • Flathead, and Phillips head screwdrivers

Prep. work, before you start installing you want to do a couple of things:

  • If you are using the 5th gen lower and it has the swirl valve, remove everything so it’s just like the 4th gen (See PIC 4 below). Once it’s removed use some the JB Weld Stick to cover the holes so there will be no leaks. I just plugged the two outside holes (see pic the holes are highlighted in red.)

    Pic 4
  • Also, you want to either fix or just prevent the VIAS from breaking by using the regular liquid JB Weld. If you want to you can replace the bolts that hold the VIAS solenoid and the metal plate on the there side in place (see pic). I had to because one of the screws stripped on me so I went to Home Depot & bought a kit that removes stripped bolts or screws.
  • Fuel rail depending if you went with the 2000 Maxima fuel rail you will have to buy something like that (see pic 1 & 2 ), and if you used The 01 QX4 fuel rail you can do what I did (see pic 3). I took off the piece you see in the pic and used a grinder to cut off the extra metal tube and bent it into place so it would reach the fuel line hose. It did not line up exactly with the hole so I just screwed in one side of the fitting and have no problems with it. I made it just like the 4th gen fuel set up wise (like the place of the FPR).
    Pic 1
    Pic 2

    Pic 3
  • First go to the fuse box located on the dash of you car and remove the fuel pump fuse. Then you want to start your car and let it run until it dies, do this process until you can’t start you car at all. This will remove most of the fuel out of your fuel rail and injectors.
  • Next up remove your intake (note: I would label all of you hose either by marking it with something or with numbered stickers, and right it down in a note book what it means).
  • On the Throttle body disconnect the plugs from the TBS and the cables. Now get a towel or a container so you can catch the antifreeze when you remove the hoses on the bottom of the Throttle body. Once you have everything disconnected from the TB remove the (12mm) bolts in the throttle body.
  • Start disconnecting all three coil packs, IACV plugs, and other wires to clear up space when removing the upper manifold.
  • After you have the TB off start removing all hoses and components that are on the upper intake manifold and labeling them. When you have everything off the upper manifold, begin removing the bolts in the front of the upper manifold (note: there are 2 bolts on the back of the upper manifold that you will have to remove). Remove the ERG guide as well.
  • For those that are using 4th gen fuel rail and 4th gen lower manifold skip to preparing the engine for the upper manifold. If you using the 5th gen parts read on
  • Once the upper manifold is remove began removing the fuel rail, I remove the fuel hoses first (I placed a towel around the hose from the fuel filter to the fuel rail so gas would not spill onto the engine). Then remove the bolts for both the fuel rail and lower manifold.
  • Once you have removed the lower 4th gen manifold you can now place the 5th gen lower manifold and bolt it up.
  • Then you can put then new fuel rail on the lower (if you are using a 2001 QX4 one or to of the holes will not line up, like mines, but it will still be good). The next thing you don’t have to do I just did: you’ll need the rubber washers that came of your old fuel injectors to place them around each of your new injectors. I did this because there was a gap from the lower manifold to the fuel injectors. After you bolt the fuel rail down it’s time to cut the old 4th gen fuel injector connectors off and solder them (or connect them anyway you want to) to the 5th gen connectors. Most people don’t like cutting wires but it’s not hard. Also, you need to grind the fuel rail (I bolted them down onto the lower manifold because it was the easiest location for me.) Now get some of the new hoses that you should have purchased and connect them from the fuel filter to fuel rail and fuel rail to fuel filter.

Preparing the engine for the upper manifold

Now that the lower manifold and fuel rail are on, cover up the holes in the lower manifold so nothing can get inside. Remove the PCV out of your valve cover because it will not let the upper manifold sit properly on the lower manifold (later I will tell you what I did for this).

For the next part, you will need your grinder or Dremel. You will need to grind down the coil pack mounting bosses BUT ONLY THE FRONT MOUNTING BOSSES#3 AND #5( SEE PIC ABOVE). #3 and #5 are the ones to the right of you if you are standing in front of the car looking at the engine. Grind down as much as you need to just keep putting the upper manifold on to check for clearance. Once you are done clean up the mess you made grinding down the bosses.

Next up is the PCV, you should have bought a new PCV valve one that would allow you to connect to some hoses. The hose’s outside diameter should be ½ inch for it to fit in the valve case hole tight and cut it to be about 6-8 inches long. You might have to lubricate the hose for it to slide in (at least that’s what my girl keeps telling me j/k lol).

Note this is only for people that are keeping the EGR and 5th gen IACV.

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If you are reading this article, you are very likely trying to resolve P0420/P0430 without having to spend a lot of money on the issue. Most of the time, the codes are due to a bad clogged catalytic converter or bad O2 sensors. Before replacing the O2 sensor, be sure to do the spacer fix modification first because O2 sensors are not cheap.

There aren’t usually any drivability issues associated with these codes. For most people, the first sign that anything is wrong at all is the check engine light. Below are the typical check engine lights you would normally get:

  • P0420 NISSAN – Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold Bank 1
  • P0430 NISSAN – Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold Bank 2

The Fix

You can eliminate the codes by using a spark plug non-fouler which tricks your engine computer to think that everything is working fine. This simple trick will pull the O2 sensor away from the exhaust flow and the computer will think the Catalytic converter is working properly. This will work if you remove the catalytic converter or have a bad cat. It’s very simple and cheap to do. Below is a video on how to perform the fix:

You can also buy them pre-made on eBay if you do not want to drill.

 

Make Your Own Spacers/Foulers

You can buy these non-fouler spacers at your local parts store. You can get them from Advanced Auto or Autozone for about $7-8 bucks.

You now need to drill out 1 of the non-foulers using a 1/2″ drill bit. When finished this is what it will look like.

O2 Sensor inserted in the modified non-fouler

Second, unmodified non-fouler now installed on modified non-fouler, then threaded into the pipe

Reference Photos

Below are photos of the spacers installed and 100% working on Nissan Maximas by generation. After installing the spacers, the CEL codes went away.

5thgen Nissan Maxima

6thgen Nissan Maxima

7thgen Nissan Maxima

Member Credit: CRiME

What’s up guys,

Following up from 95maxrider’s awesome door lock actuator thread. So My ’99 developed an issue wherein all of the locks would only lock / unlock halfway. The problem got worse with the cold weather, to the point where the rear passenger side door wouldn’t unlock at all. I got tired of reaching around to manually lock all of the doors before exiting the car, so I decided to do something about it.

I figured the actuators were failing – no problem, right? I’ll just grab some from RockAuto. Well, I soon found out that the prices for our actuators have become ridiculous. The cheapest prices for the rears were about $150 each, and the fronts were about $85 each, while the 5th gen actuators are about $10-$15 each. I didn’t want to take the chance on a used JY / ebay part, so I began to look at other options. I found a set of four universal actuators on amazon for $13 shipped, and I took a chance. What’s the worst that can happen, right? if they didn’t work well, I was only out $13. Link to the actuators I purchased is here: Amazon Amazon

They arrived a few days ago and I began the project. I started with the rear d/side door. The universal actuators came with no instructions of any kind. Thankfully, the install for these things is fairly straightforward, and I’ll do my best to recap what I did. If you can install a radio / amp, you can definitely do this.

1) First, you need to remove the rear door panel. If you’ve never done this before, here is a video tutorial, thanks to pmohr:

Once you have the panel off, you’ll be looking at this (I removed the factory plastic moisture barrier):

2) The actuator is hidden behind the door frame. You can see its harness through the hole near the seat. I removed the harness by pushing a flathead screwdriver through the hole, to release the clip. Then I used a second screwdriver to pry the harness out while pressing on the clip with the 1st screwdriver. Once I had the harness out, I bolted the actuator into this spot. To get this to work, I had to break the mounting bracket that it came with. This is a great spot for the actuator, because you don’t have to drill any new holes in the door frame. You can attach it to the existing bolts in a V orientation:

4) On the factory harness, the wires that you’ll want to tap into are the brown / white and solid brown. Connect the brown/white to green, and the solid brown to the blue wire of your universal actuator. The blue wiretaps work great for this

5) Once the wires were tapped, I plugged the harness back into the OEM actuator. This was not even necessary, because the universal actuators are more than sufficient to push / pull the rods, but I insulated the taps with electrical tape and reconnected it anyway. Once your wiring is done, you’ll need to connect the universal rod to the factory rod. I bent it into this shape, fed it through the actuator, and connected it to the factory rod with the supplied clamp and screws. **IMPORTANT** – before you bolt the new rod in, make sure that the orientation is correct – if the lock is OPEN, you want the new actuator to be EXTENDED. if the lock is closed, you want the actuator to be fully retracted. I added some blue Loctite to the clamp threads as well, in the event that the screws somehow loosen up over time.

7) While I had the panel off, I decided to add some speakers to the rear doors, to give my audio some rear fill. I had some coaxials that I had taken out of my previous car, so I decided to throw them in. Slipped a 6.5″ Boom Mat baffle into the hole there to create a tighter seal and also to protect the speaker. I cut out the rear of the baffle to allow for airflow. Bolted the speaker up, wired up the crossover, and fed the input wire out of the existing door grommet, and down through the B pillar into the car. adding the rear speakers made a HUGE difference in sound! The rear speaker doesn’t interfere with the operation of the window either, since our windows only go down halfway anyway.

8) I re attached the door panel, after using a 6″ hole saw to create an opening for the sound to come through. I covered it with a grille that I spray painted. The paint dried lighter than the representation on the cap, but I was more concerned about function over form… I didn’t really care about putting a hole in the panel, because the panel was already in rough shape anyway…

9) The lock now works perfectly! Video attached:

So that was the rear. Today, I completed the front. Similar process. Here is what I did for the driver’s side: 1) Remove the front door panel (thanks again pmohr)

2) I chose this spot to mount the actuator. Before I screwed it in, I made sure that the panel would clip on properly without being obstructed by the actuator. It did, so there it went. Be sure to measure the new rod before you bolt it in place, because I had to clip off about 2 to 3″ of it for this application. Once I had the correct length, I fed the rod through the actuator, pushed the rod through the clamp, and then I snapped the clamp onto the factory rod. Applied some loctite and screwed it down. Of course, I managed to lose one of the screws. There are supposed to be two screws securing the new clamp to the factory rod, and one screw securing the clamp to the new rod. It held fine with one screw, so I proceeded.

3) I already had some sound dampening material on my front doors, so I had to peel some of it back to access the wiring harness for the front actuator. It runs along the bottom of the door. I pulled it inside of my kilmat, and stripped away some of the plastic conduit to expose the wires. Same deal here as the rear, you want the brown / white and solid brown wires. Since the new actuator is at the top, and the wiring is at the bottom, I had to extend the wires. I crimped on some 14ga cable, wrapped it up, and ran it down to the factory harness. Used the blue wire taps again, wiring done!

4) Tested the new actuator, works perfectly! The lock snaps open and closed as if it were brand new. Video attached:

https://vimeo.com/user104171777

5) Wrapped everything up with tape, put some kilmat over the new actuator to help protect it (probably not necessary, but didn’t hurt anything).

6) Once I confirmed everything was working correctly, I put the door panel back on. It snapped right back into place. No resistance or snags of any kind. Well guys, the verdict is that these actuators are a definite hit for $13. I mean, that comes out to about $3.25 per door. So if anyone out there is in a similar position, I definitely recommend giving this a shot if you’d rather not drop about $500 on replacement bolt-on actuators. I hope that this thread can be helpful to some. Hopefully I didn’t leave anything out. If anyone has any questions, feel free to ask.

If you are DIY person and love working on your Nissan Maxima, then this tool is a MUST HAVE! When you go to the Nissan dealer, the person working on your car typically uses a tool called a Nissan Consult. The Nissan Consult that the dealer uses costs thousand of dollars and is only available to dealers. By using the Nissan DataScan software, a laptop and a generic VAG COM OBDII adapter you can achieve just about the same level of on-board diagnosis that $5,000 Nissan Consult provides. This software allows you to:

  • Check CEL codes
  • Check/Reset ABS and SRS-Airbag Faults
  • Check/Reset TCM Codes
  • Adjust timing
  • Perform Idle Air Relearn
  • Reset ECU learned settings
  • Data-log
  • Program keys
  • Check Emissions Readiness Monitors
  • Active Test temporary modify some of the engine parameters for testing purposes
  • And Much much more….

The software itself costs $55.00 and generic cable costs around $7.00-$8.00. 

Software License Purchase Link: Nissan DataScan II

Software Download Links:

OBD2 Cable eBay Link: KKL 409 VAG COM OBD2 Cable

You can find the cables on eBay between $6.00-$8.00 shipped. Search for the following keywords on eBay and you will find it: “KKL 409.1 VAG-COM OBD2 USB Cable

Below are all the functions it provides:

ECU Part Number

This is the main window of the NDSII software which shows the ECM Nissan Identification part number. Basic and Advance Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons, using the shortcut keys (F1 – F11) or using the Menu bar. Most functions except Data Replay and Log Analyser are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates communication between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Data Display Settings

This window is used to assign parameters to be displayed by the Data Display function. Only parameters that are supported by the currently connected ECU are available for selection. Gauges are counted from left to right, top to bottom. Multiple gauges can monitor the same parameter.

Data Logging ECM

Selected parameters can be logged to a file. This function can also be accessed from the Data Display window. The data log file can be analysed using the Data Replay or Log Analyser functions.

Self Diagnostics ECM

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset engine ECU error codes.

Idle Adjustment

Idle Adjustment function allows users to adjust the base idle RPM. The setting is saved to the ECU and it does not reset with engine restart.

Timing Adjustment

Timing Adjustment function allows users to adjust the base ignition timing. The setting is saved to the ECU and it does not reset with engine restart.

Active Test ECM

Active Test allows users to temporary modify some of the engine parameters for testing purposes. They return to their original values when a function is stopped, PC disconnected or engine restarted.

Note: It is possible to damage the engine if the A/F Base % functions is used to excessively modify fuel delivery. Likewise the engine may overheat if the Engine Temperature is set to low for a long period of time. Do not use those functions if you are not sure how they will effect your engine.

Work Support

Work Support functions allow users to perform some of the advance service procedures. Those procedures may need to be performed after replacement parts are installed.

Clear Self Learn – clears the A/F Base SL map learned by the ECU.

Idle Air Volume Learn – is an operation to learn the fully closed position of the throttle valve.

Program Immobiliser Key – allows to register the Nissan transponder keys with the Immobiliser Note: The immobiliser security PIN CODE needs to be known. Initially all registered keys will be erased and all keys will need to be reregistered.

Cylinder Power Test

Cylinder Power Test function can be used to identify cylinder that is under performing. This function allows shutting down individual cylinders. If all of the cylinders are producing the same amount of power the engine RPMs will drop exactly the same amount on each cylinder that is cancelled.

Log Analyser is used to review log files previously generated by with Data Logging function. Graphs are drawn by selecting boxes next to parameter value. Graph colours match the parameter value colours.

Speed Test

Speed Test is a unique function for measuring car’s acceleration performance. Predefined or user specific tests can be used. Due to the low resolution of Nissan speed sensors, measurements should only be used as a guide and not a true reflection of car’s performance.

Note: This function should not be used while driving on public roads.

Address Watch

Address Watch function is used for monitor specific ECU memory addresses. By monitoring a memory address extra information can be retrieved that is not normally available using Consult II protocol. A knock sensor reading can be obtain using this method if knock sensor memory address is known.

Wideband O2 sensor

Nissan DataScan II also supports wideband Air/Fuel ratio meters from Innovate Motorsports. A second serial port is used to connect to the controller and collect data.

The data from the wideband meter can be displayed or logged in conjunction with other engine parameters using the Data Logging function.

ECU Part Number BCM

The BCM tab shows the BCM Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. All functions are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Self Diagnostics BCM

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset BCM error codes.

Active Test BCM

Active Test allows users to temporally activate some of the functions of the BCM. This is usually used to manually test the functionality of the systems controlled by the BCM.

Note: Functions not supported by the BCM are disabled (grayed out).

ECU Part Number TCM

The TCM tab shows the TCM Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. Most functions except Data Replay and Log Analyser are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Data Logging TCM

Selected parameters can be logged to a file. This function can also be accessed from the Data Display window so the data can be logged while it is displayed. The data log file can be analysed using the Data Replay or Data Analyser functions.

Self Diagnostics TCM

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset TCM error codes.

ECU Part Number ABS

The ABS tab shows the ABS Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. Most functions except Data Replay and Log Analyser are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Data Logging ABS

Selected parameters can be logged to a file. This function can also be accessed from the Data Display window so the data can be logged while it is displayed. The data log file can be analysed using the Data Replay or Data Analyser functions.

Self Diagnostics ABS

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset ABS error codes.

Work Support ABS

Work Support functions allow users to perform advance service procedures. Those procedures may need to be performed after replacing parts.

Steering Angle Sensor Reset – After removing/installing or replacing VDC/TCS/ABS control unit, steering angle sensor, steering components, suspension components, and tires, or after adjusting wheel alignment, make sure to adjust neutral position of steering angle sensor before running vehicle.

ECU Part Number SRS

The SRS tab shows the SRS Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. All functions are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Self Diagnostics SRS

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset SRS error codes.

Note: Recorded faults are historical and can not be cleared.

Work Support

Work Support functions allow users to perform the advance service procedures. Those procedures may need to be performed after replacement parts are installed.

Program Immobiliser Key – allows to register the Nissan transponder keys with the Immobiliser Note: The immobiliser security PIN CODE needs to be known. Initially all registered keys will be erased and all keys will need to be reregistered.

OBDII Self Diagnostics

OBDII Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset ECU error codes.

OBDII Monitor Status

OBDII Monitor Status shows the current status of various monitoring systems used by the car’s engine management system.

OBDII Log Analyser

Log Analyser is used to review log files previously generated by with Data Logging function. Graphs are drawn by selecting boxes next to parameter value. Graph colours match the parameter value colours.

OBDII Fuel System Satus

OBDII Fuel System Status can be used to check if the car’s fuel system is running in Closed Loop mode.

Fuel systems do not normally refer to injector banks. They are intended to represent completely different fuel systems that can independently enter and exit closed loop fuel. Banks of injectors on a V-engine are generally not independent and share the same closed-loop enablement criteria.

OBDII Data Logging

Selected OBDII parameters can be logged to a file. The data log file can then be analysed using the Log Analyser function.

Due to the slow nature of OBDII protocol it’s recommended to log only the required parameters.

Member Credit: Ronny Para

This article will help you install Audi R8 Coil Packs on your VQ30DE. For those that don’t know, Audi coilpacks are stronger and better than Nissan coilpacks. They add better mpg and more HP/TQ. It works on bone stock vehicles or highly modified vehicles.

Nissan Coilpack only has 1 coil. Audi has 2 coils as you can see in the picture below. By having 2 coils it doubles the spark output and can easily handle spark blow out that turbocharged vehicles suffer from. Because it’s outer exterior has a metal body it can dissipate heat ALOT quicker than Nissan rubber which helps with heat cycling. It’s also cheaper than OEM Nissan Coilpacks.

Front Valve Cover

The Audi R8 coil packs fit perfect on the front valve cover and do not require any modification. It will work fine even if you have NWP spacers installed on the front.

Rear Valve Cover

The rear valve cover requires some modification for a flush fit to ensure the R8 plug makes full contact with the spark plug.  Since the coil packs now go further in…. they clear the manifold as well which requires no additional spacers.

Audi R8 Coil Pack Advantages:

  • 50,000 volts compared to Nissans/Infiniti 30,000 volts.
    • Some measure it with Kv so Nissans coils put out 21Kv while VW coils put out 30Kv
  • Quicker Heat dissipation. (Because of its metal body construction it can quickly dissipate heat. Nissan OEM body is made out of rubber that isolates heat instead of disperses it.)
  • More complete burn of the fuel mixture compared to OEM Nissan which equals to better MPG.
  • Idle Stability Improved
  • NO CEL (Check Engine Lights)
  • BEST PART ABOUT THEM IS THEY ARE CHEAPER $$$ than Nissan OEM yet they are much better.
  • Looks 10000% Cooler than OEM Coilpacks

Now the coil packs price varies due to different name brands. They range from $132-$216 for a V6 engine. Below is the link of the coil packs below so you can see the prices and brands. Doesn’t matter which brand you use, I’ve tested them all and they all make the same exact power.

Order Link: https://www.nedautoparts.com/search?q=Audi+coilpack

Adapters & Wiring

You can purchase the adapters directly from Rico who is on the Facebook groups.

You can also use o2 plugs from a 02/03 Maxima to make the adapters for the plug. Just have to file down the alignment guide on the outside of the blue connector.

Of you can splice in directly (Courtesy of Jerome Fenwick)

Owner: Steve Fernandez aka 98MaXedOut

Year: 1997
Model: Maxima
Color:  White
Transmission: 5-Speed Manual
Trim: SE

Mod List:

  • 2003 Modded VQ35 with 3.0 timing
  • 5-Speed Transmission w/ LSD
  • ARP Rod bolts
  • ARP Main Bolts
  • ARP Head studs
  • 350z Revup Cams
  • PnP LIM
  • HR Valve Springs and retainers double shimmed (can safely rev to 8k)
  • Revup Oil Pump
  • Stillen Vortech V2 Supercharger
  • Stillen V1 Plate
  • Stillen Idler Pulley
  • Stillen Charge Pipe
  • T-Rex fuel Pump
  • Lexus Tensioner Pulley

Owner: Meximax

Year: 1996
Model: Maxima
Color:  White
Transmission: 6-Speed Manual
Trim: GXE

Highlights: Fully built FWD VQ35 with a overspinning, belt-slipping Vortech V2 SQ running on custom JWT tune and mated to a 6-speed HLSD putting down 443whp/378wtq (STD corrected) on 93 octane. Uncorrected numbers were 454whp and 387wtq.

Mod List:

Engine:
– Swapped VQ35 with VQ30 timing equipment (no variable valve timing)
– 8.8:1 Wiseco Pistons (stock bore)
– Eagle Rods w/ 3/8” ARP Bolts
– Balanced/Blue Printed Rotating Assembly
– ARP Main and Head Studs (std)
– JDM Cams (AKA JWT S1 Knockoffs) on custom intake cam timing
– Cosworth Headgasket
– JWT Valve Springs/shims
– Mild head work (gasket matched intake/exhaust ports)
– New OEM VQ30 timing equipment (chains, tensioners, etc., including water pump)
– Custom Z33 Intake Manifold w/ Motordyne 7/16” Spacer
– 70mm ’01Pathfinder TB

Boost:
– Vortech V2 SQ
– Matty’s V1 SC Plate
– 2.62” pulley
– FMIC (bar and plate) 29*12*3.5, 3” in/out
– 3” charge pimping

Transmission:
– Swapped ’03 6-spd transmission
– Helical Limited Slip Differential from Spec V
– 3.813 Final Gear retained
– Stock Flywheel with welded A32 CPS Signal Disk
– JWT Z33 Clutch
– Stock ’03 6-spd axles
– Redline 100% heavy duty shockproof oil

Engine Management System (EMS):
– JWT Custom Boost Tune (93 octane and 116 octane, 7300 rev limit)
– Apexi SAFC
– J&S Safegaurd w/ knock monitor
– Kenne Bell Boost-a-Spark
– NGK Iridium gapped to .035
– Innovate XD16 O2 Wideband

Fuel:
– RC 550 Injectors
– Walbro 255 high pressure fuel pump (hardwired)
– Custom Dual Feed Returneless rails on OEM return system
– Aeromotive Adjustable Fuel Pressure Regulator (1:1 rise rate)

Exhaust:
– Hotshot headers w/ custom 3” collector
– Custom 2.5” True dual with X-pipe

Member Credit: dustey

The Issue

I have been battling a cylinder 6 misfire (P0306) for many months now. I have spent a lot of time on this website researching, but I can’t seem to find anything that works.

The problem: Intermittent misfiring on cylinder 6 that will come and go. It can switch from misfiring to not misfiring instantly. No change due to driving conditions. It happens on the interstate at 70mph, in neighborhoods at 25mph, and at idle. Some days it runs great, only misfiring for a short time, other days its a battle all day long. Sometimes it accelerates just fine, other times it misfires all the way. The idle is fine. Although it may misfire, the idle stays very normal, with no fluctuation.

I have checked the easy stuff already:

I have done all of the above, and none have made any difference in the misfiring. Always on cylinder 6.

I, fortunately, know a tech at the local Nissan dealership who also tested the wiring harness and intake plenum with similar results. He also flashed my ECU. He is now saying it’s the ECU because none of the other things have fixed it. His cost on the ECU is $650!

I called David from SpeedometerRepairGuy.com and explained what I needed and he said the ECU rebuild he does for Maxima’s wouldn’t fix my misfiring (only fixes damage from a bad IACV), also stating he had never heard of this problem before. Again, I have no problem with my idle.

Not sure what to try next. A friend of mine suggested the fuel filter, but the Nissan tech was adamant that it couldn’t be the fuel filter, also citing its a “lifetime” part. Thought about just changing it, since it’s so cheap anyway.

Any other ideas of things I should try before getting a new (or used) ECU? I have already purchased one used ECU through car-parts.com and it was bad, so I am 1) trying to avoid the hassle of trying to find a good used ECU and 2) trying to avoid spending $650+ on a new ECU from Nissan. After all, at this point, I don’t know it’s a bad ECU, it’s by deduction that I/we think its the ECU.

I replaced the ECU with a reman unit from the dealership and had them install and reconfigure everything. (I did this as I pulled my then current ECU out and it was clear that water had gotten into the unit and there was corrosion on the board plus my buddy the Nissan tech is usually spot on.) Didn’t misfire for a day, but its back with vengeance now.

Since the posts above, I replaced the spark plugs again with OEMs (had Auotlites before), and today I switched coils between the bad 6th cylinder and a good cylinder (2), and it still continues to misfire and throw a P0306.

I just don’t understand why it would not misfire for 2 straight weeks when I replaced the fuel filter/strainer and then come back. Could it have something to do with fuel pressure? I mean, replacing the fuel filter/strainer does mess with the fuel pressure since you have to disconnect the lines and pull the fuse? I may be wrong, I am no mechanic…

What’s next? Switch out the injector again? I am second-guessing everything I have done now…

The Fix

To follow up on this thread, I checked the compression (dry) and it was 125 across the board. Low, but not inconsistent which is good. Despite the Nissan tech’s advice to not replace the fuel filter (strainer) since it’s a “lifetime” part, I did anyway because it was a $13 part, easy to do, and $13 isn’t a lot to take a chance on in case it does work. I did both the compression test and fuel filter last Thursday (8/19/10) and it hasn’t misfired since. Unbelievable.

It started doing it on Friday 9/3/10. It went 2 weeks without misfiring, and started back again. The frequency seems to be less, however, it is throwing the P0306 code again (same cylinder as before). Since the problem started however long ago, it hasn’t gone that long without misfiring. It leads me to believe that its fuel-related somehow.

A friend suggested that it may be caused by a dirty fuel tank… reasoning that it ran fine for 2 weeks with a brand new fuel filter until it reached the dirty stuff in the tank. It did start misfiring just after I had filled up at the gas station (waiting in line for the car wash at the same station, actually). I just find it hard to believe that a dirty tank could do that and cause the exact same cylinder to misfire, but stranger things have happened.

Well, I got it figured out. There is something loose or a bad connection with the actual connector on the wiring harness which connects to the coil pack. Me and a friend of mine just starting wiggling all of the wires we could find after determining that it had to be something electrical related. By moving the connector itself a hair this or that way, I could cause it to misfire and then stop. We rigged it up to hold its place where it’s not misfiring:

So far so good. It has misfired maybe once or twice in the last week but it was literally just ones or twice and then it would be fine.My mechanic buddy at the Nissan dealership is going to replace it when he can find a spare. I know what you are thinking… Shouldn’t I have noticed this a really long time ago? Well, in hindsight, yes of course. But, it was one of those things that I took for granted and looked past. I never considered it could be something like that…

Member Credit: Unklejoe / EddyMaxx

UPDATE: November 11, 2019 – I programmed a new ECU using the below and worked 100%. It took about 5 minutes. Place charge anywhere between $50-$150 to do this procedure. Super simple!

Every 99-03 Maxima uses the same PIN for the NATS. The pin is “5523“. This is the default “master” PIN. 

This means that you can use a BlaZt cable to re-initialize the NATS on any Maxima of those years. This is particularly useful for those who have to replace their ECU and don’t feel like going to the dealership and dropping $100 to get the ECU programmed to their key/immo (or those who simply want to add more keys to their car).

More Info on Nissan Datascan & ODB2 Cable: https://www.my4dsc.com/nissan-datascan-ii-aka-the-affordable-nissan-consult/

Normally, the PIN is provided to you when you buy the car but most people lose it. Well, now you can finally add your own keys to the car and/or re-program a used ECU’s to the car.

For those who don’t know the PIN, the PIN can be decoded using a software called “Nissan SuperCode”. The software requires the serial number from the BCM that the ECU came from. It will then provide the PIN. The only problem is that when you buy an ECU from a junkyard, they usually don’t provide/know the BCM serial number from the car that the ECU came from. Normally, you’d have to go to the dealer so they can decode it, but now that I discovered this “master” PIN, you can do it yourself!

The following cars all use the same “5523” default PIN:

  • Nissan Altima 2001-2004
  • Nissan Maxima 1999-2003
  • Nissan Pathfinder 2001-2004
  • Nissan Sentra 2000-2005
  • Nissan 350Z < 2002
  • Nissan X-Terra 2003-2004
  • Infinity QX4 2001-2004
  • Infinity QX45 2002
  • Infinity Q45 2001-2005
  • Infinity G20 2000-2002
  • Infinity I30 / I35 2001-2005

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