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Community Member Credit: Ksnelgrove

I just installed these aluminum valve covers on my 5thgen Maxima. AND YES, THEY ARE ALUMINUM! The brand is MITZONE. They are well-made and come with gaskets. I have no leaks or problems so far. They are also very sturdy/solid vs. the crap plastic stuff. Highly recommend.

eBay Description: ALUMINUM Valve Cover Kit for 02-09 NISSAN Altima Maxima Murano Quest I35 3.5L
Price: $87.99-$95.00 (Shipped)
Order Links Below:

OEM Part Numbers (These can cost over $400+):

  • 6thgen Front: 13264-ZA30A (Price: $197.18)
  • 6thgen Rear: 13264-7Y000 (Price: $197.18)

Fitment:

  • 2002-2004 Infiniti I35 V6
  • 2002-2006 Nissan Altima 3.5L V6
  • 2002-2008 Nissan Maxima 3.5L V6
  • 2003-2007 Nissan Murano 3.5L V6
  • 2004-2009 Nissan Quest 3.5L V6

Installed Photo:

OEM Price Reference ($450 Shipped)

Stripped to Reveal Aluminum

 

Community Member Credit: sublime258

Issues: My power sunroof switch stopped working this weekend on my ’03 Maxima GLE. I pull it backwards for the sunroof to slide back and nothing happens?

Solution:

  • This happens to me almost every time I disconnect my battery terminal. I found that this will usually fix it: Use the sunroof tilt switch to open it all the way (you will have to push it a bunch of times), and then do the same thing to close it all the way. Once you open it and close it all the way using the switch, then try using the slider switch thing, and it should open. If it doesn’t, turn your car off and back on and try again. This works almost every time for me.
  • You shouldn’t have to open it all the way. Just close it and hold the tilt switch (close) until you hear a click…that will reset the switches.

How to Fix/Reset Sunroof motor:

  1. Close your sunroof all the way.
  2. Turn off your car.
  3. Disconnect your battery.
  4. Turn on your lights, and step on your brakes. Do it like 10 times. (You are basically draining the system.)
  5. Hook up your battery.
  6. Tilt your sunroof up, then back down.
  7. Pull back on the slide lever. It should be fixed.

 

Community Member Credit: Jeff Ketch

Here is a list of things that need to be done for the 60K service.
  1. Spark Plugs: 6 NGK Platinum spark plugs are required for the tune-up. Platinum plugs do not need to be gapped. If you use copper plugs the gap is .044. Put anti-seize on the spark plug threads and torque to 18 ft/lbs. The spark plug socket is 16mm or 5/8. The spark chambers are very deep as you will find out. A magnet will help to remove and install the plugs. Also a couple of socket extensions are necessary. Remove the spark plug cover (Nissan V6 3000) to reveal the front three plugs. The rear three plugs are behind the exhaust manifolds. The last picture shows an approximate location.
           
  2. Oil Change: Make sure the car is on a flat surface. Turn the steering wheel all the way to the right. The filter and plug are behind a panel in the passenger fender well. There are about 4 Phillips head screws holding the panel in place. There is one more Phillips head screw under the front nose of the car that needs to be removed. Once the panel is removed you can see the plug and filter. Remove the drain plug (turn left) and make sure that you keep the crush ring that is on the drain plug. Nissan recommends that you replace the crush ring ever oil change. The ring should be good for about 3-4 oil changes. Remove the old oil filter and then reinstall the oil plug. Put fresh oil into the new filter and install. When the filter gives slight resistance turn it another 2/3 of a turn. Tightening the filter by hand is all that is needed. Add 4 quarts of fresh oil and then start the car. The car takes 4.5 quarts but make sure that you do not over fill. The Nissan filter # 15208-31U00.
  3.  
  4. Fuel Filter: The filter is located against the fire wall near the brake fluid. There is no real easy way to remove the filter. It has a hose clamp at the top and bottom of the filter. The hose clamps are tightened with Phillips head screws. The problem is Nissan did not leave a lot of room to get a screwdriver in there in order to remove the filter. If you want to attempt to change the filter here are a few tips. Leave the car running. You will need to remove the fuel pump fuse. The fuse panel is under the steering wheel on the left. Locate the fuel pump fuse and remove it. In about 5-10 seconds the car will stall. Try to start the car at least one more time. This releases the pressure in the fuel line. Turn the car off completely. Now try and remove the top and bottom hose on the filter. When reinstalling the filter make sure that you don’t install upside down. When new filter is installed put the fuse back in and start the car.
     
  5. Transmission Fluid: The drain is under the transmission near the driver’s side of the car. The fill is in the front of the engine and looks like a large square opening. In order to open that fill plug you need a 1/2″ ratchet with out the socket. The transmission takes 4.5 quarts of MT-90. I have provided a picture from the shop manual to show the location of the drain bolt and fill plug. Easy way to fill the transmission is to get some plastic tubing and tape a funnel to one end.
  6. Radiator Coolant: The radiator takes 9.5 quarts of fluid. The mixture is 50% coolant and 50% distilled water. There are 3 drains that you need to find. One is the radiator drain which is directly under the radiator. The second is in front of the engine dead center near the exhaust manifold. Third is in back of the engine. Here is a picture of the third drain bolt. If you take off the passenger front tire, look on the left side of the front shocks and turn your head a little to the right. That is were the picture is looking. The bolt is in the top right of the picture left of the black wire. I had the dealer to it for under $50.
  7. PCV Valve: The location of the valve is not longer a mystery. Located near the throttle body.
  8. Belt Replacement: The ’95 has two accessory belts. One is the alternator and the other is compressor/power steering. This jobs took me over a hour to complete. You will need long combination wrenches and sockets. The sizes are 12 and 14 millimeter. Please note how tight the belts are because you have to adjust the belt accordingly. It’s call “deflection” so please push on the belts and remember. After the install you need to get the belts close to the same deflection.

    Take off the passenger side front wheel and the oil cover. This will expose the belts.

     


    View from under the car. Looking at the center pulley. You have to loosen the bolt in the middle of the pulley. Then directly above is the adjustment bolt that you will loosen to raise the pulley. The next picture shows the top bolt.

     


    View from the top passenger fender looking near time chain cover. Loosen the bolt so that you can raise the center pulley. This is the belt that needs to be removed first.

     


    View from the top looking to the left. Loosen the bolt so that you can lower the power steering pump. There is a bolt on the other end of the threads that you can’t see. That bolt will lower the pump.

     


    View from the bottom of the car. Tighten the bolt so that you can lower the power steering pump. The bolt is threaded into a clamp that when tightened the clamp closes, lowering the power steering pump.
  9. Tighten throttle cable: Make sure the cable is low and in-between the half moon shape. The cable at the relaxed state should not be above the half moon…there needs to be more tension. The outside cable is your cruise control and the inside is your throttle. To fix this follow the cable about 6 inches back to two nuts. Loose the front nut and spin that forward, the cable will come loose but now you spin the back nut in the same direction and that will take up the slack along with securing the cable to the mounting bracket.
  10. ECU reset: This is not needed for the 60K service. If the “check engine light” comes on. This is the proper way to reset it. Andi is the one who scanned the page.

Community Member Credit: Soonerfan

Whenever people have a code that is related to an O2 sensor, they always have to figure out exactly which sensor that it corresponds to (bank 1 & 2 and sensor 1 & 2)….so I created this.

Description of O2 Codes

BANK 1
FRONT (Sensor 1)
P0031 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Heater Low Voltage (Bank 1)
P0051 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Heater High Voltage (Bank 1)
P0130 – Front O2 Sensor Circuit (Bank 1)
P0131 – Front O2 Sensor (Lean) (Bank 1)
P0132 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Circuit High Voltage (Bank 1)
P0133 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Circuit Slow Response (Bank 1)
P0134 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Circuit No Activity Detected (Bank 1)
P0135 – Front O2 Sensor Heater (Bank 1)
P1143 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Lean Shift Monitoring (Bank 1)
P1144 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Rich Shift Monitoring (Bank 1)
P1148 – Closed Loop Control (Bank 1)

BANK 1
REAR (Sensor 2)
P0037 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Heater Low Voltage (Bank 1)
P0057 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Heater High Voltage (Bank 1)
P0137 – Rear O2 Sensor Low Input (Bank 1)
P0138 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Circuit High Voltage (Bank 1)
P0139 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Circuit Slow Response (Bank 1)
P0140 – Rear O2 Sensor High Input (Bank 1)
P0141 – Rear O2 Sensor Heater (Bank 1)
P1146 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Minimum Voltage Monitoring (Bank 1)
P1147 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Maximum Voltage Monitoring (Bank 1)

——————————————————————————————–

BANK 2
FRONT (Sensor 1)
P0032 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Heater Low Voltage (Bank 2)
P0052 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Heater High Voltage (Bank 2)
P0150 – Front O2 Sensor Circuit (Bank 2)
P0151 – Front O2 Sensor (Lean) (Bank 2)
P0152 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Circuit High Voltage (Bank 2)
P0153 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Circuit Slow Response (Bank 2)
P0154 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Circuit No Activity Detected (Bank 2)
P0155 – Front O2 Sensor Heater (Bank 2)
P1163 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Lean Shift Monitoring (Bank 2)
P1164 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 1 Rich Shift Monitoring (Bank 2)
P1168 – Closed Loop Control (Bank 2)

BANK 2
REAR (Sensor 2)
P0038 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Heater Low Voltage (Bank 2)
P0058 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Heater High Voltage (Bank 2)
P0157 – Rear O2 Sensor Low Input (Bank 2)
P0158 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Circuit High Voltage (Bank 2)
P0159 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Circuit Slow Response (Bank 2)
P0160 – Rear O2 Sensor High Input (Bank 2)
P0161 – Rear O2 Sensor Heater (Bank 2)
P1166 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Minimum Voltage Monitoring (Bank 2)
P1167 – Heated Oxygen Sensor 2 Maximum Voltage Monitoring (Bank 2)

 

Community Member Credit: Kevlo911

I bet over 75% of 4th gen owners have a leaking steering rack and/or worn tie rods…

I bought the rack from: https://www.carsteering.com/buynow/1999/Nissan/Maxima/Rack_and_Pinion/80-00386_R

I bought the 99se rack because it is stiffer. It comes with new inner tie rods and new o-rings. You should replace the outer tie rods and sway bar bushings at the same time.

As for the how-to.

  • Loosen lugs
  • Jack up and put the car on jack stands.
  • Remove wheels
  • Remove outer tie rods(I did not and paid for it ) – You need to rent the outer tie rod removal tool from AutoZone to do this.
  • Remove the bolt on top of the sway bar end link and the 2 bolts on the bracket that holds the “inner” bushing in.
  • Move the sway bar up and wiggle it out from the passenger side.

Remove the y-pipe (rent the o2 removal tool)

As you can see, I forgot to rent the tool

Now the fun part. Crossmember. Remove the engine mount bolts, in the rear I used a long 10in extension to get to the bolt from the engine bay(intake removed). Front engine mounts you need an open-end wrench on one side and a socket on the other(or two sockets…) I supported the engine with a jack and a 2×4. If you have a tranny jack it would be better. Remove the 2 bolts in the front and rear(4total bolts) on the cross member and it will dropdown. You can replace the mounts right now if you want to.

See a plate covering this mount on the rack. It is behind the rear header and is held on by three 10mm screws. Remove it.

Now remove the fluid lines, have something to catch the fluid(I had a trash can lid). Remove these from the engine bay, it is much easier that way.

Use a 14mm open-end wrench to get the bottom one. On the top one, remove the hose and swap the nipple on the new rack once it is out of the car.

Remove those nuts. Now you will see the spindle, there is a 12mm nut holding it on the spindle of the rack. Make sure the steering wheel is straight before you remove it.

Remove the bolts holding on the rack now. One mount is pictured above, the other you will see when you are down there. USE THIS ALONG WITH MY TIPS TO CHANGE THE RACK

FSM is basically the same write up too. As you can tell I didn’t do everything they did.

You will remove the rack from the middle, it will NOT slide out from the sides(I found out the hard way). You will move it towards the pass side and then drop it down in the middle. You will install it the same way. I also installed new bushing on the rack, I got MOOG bushings from rockauto.com

You will soon find out the spindle does not want to go into the joint. You will have to bang on top of the joint to get it on the spindle. I used my tq wrench and breaker bar to bang it in. I didn’t have a rubber mallet(I did this with the rack mounts partially in, only the lower nuts were in). Rest is the reversal. Next, you get it aligned… I still have to do this, my wheel is cocked to the right.

This will take all day and would be much easier with air tools. But I saved about 800-1200bucks labor by doing it myself and I now have a stiffer and better feeling steering system.

Community Member Credit: K Pazzo 6

Part Number Required: 28911-1E400
Price: $30.00

PLEASE KEEP IN MIND THAT PICS SHOW WASHER FLUID RESERVOIR WAS TAKEN OUT. YOU DO NOT NEED TO TAKE IT OUT, BUT I LEARNED THAT AFTER I TOOK IT OUT & SINCE IT WAS MY FIRST TIME DOING IT

Instructions

1) Open plastic cover from underneath the car, like you would do to change the passenger side fog light.

2) Now check to see if you see wire circled in the photo. This wire is needed to make the sensor work.

3) Now test-fit the sensor tube with wire.

4) Ok now to make sure it works. You need another person to help you with this step. Connect sensor tube. Now find a water bottle and cut the top off like the above pic, & fill it with water. Now turn the car on & dip the sensor tube in a bottle full of water. Now have another person check to see if your washer fluid warning light comes on your dash.

5) Now that you checked that it works. Have a bucket underneath & unplug the tube shown in the photo to drain any washer fluid in there.

6) Now look closely at the bottom left of the reservoir & you should see a sketched circle where the sensor tube should be.

7) Now take a 1 inch or 1 1/4 inch wood boring bit (I think that’s what it’s called) & drill a hole where the sketched circle is on the reservoir. Should look like the photo below.

8) As you can see in the photo I didn’t have a perfect circle. Because I believe the 1inch bit was too small but I just went round & round to make the hole bigger. *Don’t make it too big & test fit tube if need to. Should be a TIGHT fit for the sensor tube.*

9) Once the hole is big enough. Put on rubber around hole that came with sensor tube.

10) Now insert the sensor tube. Should be a tight fit!

11) Now with some silicone put it around the edges of the tube you inserted. This is just for extra protection that it won’t leak.

12) Now get wire & plug it into sensor tube & your DONE!!!

**To be safe I didn’t re-fill my washer fluid reservoir for a couple of days. Just to make sure the silicone completely dried.**

Community Member Credit: Eddy

OEM Driver Side Part Number: 38342-81X00
Alternate Non-OEM Part Numbers: Timken / O’Reilly – 710118
Part Description: SEAL-OIL, Nissan Driver Side Output Shaft Seal / Differential Transmission Case
Price: $8.00-$9.00

OEM Passenger Side: 38342-81X01
Alternate Non-OEM Part Numbers: Timken / O’Reilly – 710124
Part Description: SEAL-OIL, Nissan Driver Side Output Shaft Seal / Differential Clutch Housing
Price: $8.00-$9.00

How-to Video

Community Member Credit: fxlr8

MATERIALS:

TOOLS:

  • PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER

SAFETY

  • EVEN IF THIS PROCEDURE DOES NOT REQUIRE RAISING OF THE VEHICLE, WE CANNOT STRESS ENOUGH…NEVER GET UNDER A RAISED VEHICLE WITHOUT THE USE OF QUALITY JACK-STANDS

1. REMOVE THE DOOR SILL BY PULLING UP AND UN-POPPING THE CLIPS.

2. UNSCREW THIS PLASTIC NUT AND REMOVE THE SIDE PLASTIC PANEL. THE PLASTIC NUT SHOULD COME OFF BY HAND, IF NOT USE A WRENCH.

3. LOOK UNDER THE GLOVE-BOX AND REMOVE THIS PLASTIC PANEL, PULL DOWN ON THE FRONT AND IT WILL UNCLIP.

4. USING YOUR PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER UNSCREW THESE 2 PHILLIPS SCREWS UNDER THE GLOVE BOX.

5. OPEN YOUR GLOVEBOX AND UNSCREW THESE 4 SCREWS.

6. YOUR GLOVEBOX SHOULD NOW COME OFF (DISCONNECT ANY WIRES NECESSARY – DO NOT DISCONNECT THE YELLOW AIR BAG PLUG/WIRE).

7. TO REMOVE THE FILTER YOU WILL PUSH ON THIS TAB TO RELEASE THE FILTER COVER.

8. PULL OUT THE OLD FILTER.

9. INSTALL YOUR FILTER **(NOTE THE DIRECTION OF AIR FLOW ON THE NEW FILTER – THE AIR FLOWS DOWNARDS IN OUR CARS, SO MAKE SURE YOU INSTALL YOUR FILTER PROPERLY).

NOTE: WHEN PUTTING THE FILTER COVER (DOOR) BACK ON YOU WILL NEED TO LIFT THE FILTER UP WHILE CLOSING THE COVER, THE DOOR HAS TABS ON IT AND THE FILTER NEEDS TO SIT ABOVE THESE TABS.

Community Member Credit: maxud

I have a 2009 Maxima SV with both electric tilt and telescoping functions. I am at 92k miles and recently my tilt motor stopped adjusting the steering wheel, I know, first-world problems here. I know the motor still worked because you can hear it moving what’s left of the gear.

I did some research and yes, you can buy a new motor from Nissan for $200. However, in my research, I ran into this product – Dorman 905-522. At this point in time, it’s a poorly made product and badly advertised as well. Nowhere, does it say that it’s compatible with 09 Maxima, though later Maxima’s are on the compatibility list. I saw a single review of this product on amazon and decided to take a plunge.

Yesterday, I had the “pleasure” of repairing my motor. So the product comes with new shafts and molded on Nylon gears as well as C-clips and some grease. It also comes with pretty good instructions on the actual repair.

To start with, you want to follow Nissan’s TSB on replacing one of these motors. Here is a link for you: 2012-04-13_225900_09_maxima_steering_column_bulletin

Once you have the motor out, you follow a couple of steps from Dorman’s manual, specifically:

  • Take off the c-clip or locking the o-washer from the end of the shaft.
  • Remove a set screw/spring from the adjustment block (located on the side of the block, inner hex)
  • Unscrew adjustment block
  • Use the permanent marker to draw a line across the outer nut, inner locking nut, and body of the motor. This is necessary to apply the same preload to the inner bearings
  • Remove the large hex nut with a crescent wrench, it was not super tight. I used adjustable pliers to get it off.
  • Then slide the black spacer block included in the Dorman kit over the shaft, it should engage the inner nut. The block is square, but the nut has 12 points, so it will engage without any issues.
  • Spin the inner nut off
  • Remove old shaft, be careful, there is a bearing on the bottom and the top of the nylon gear.

At this point you should confirm that your old nylon gear is busted, mine had a whole chunk of gear missing. Assembly is reverse of disassembly.

But here is some bad news and good news.

Bad news first: When I tried to spin the adjustment block on the new shaft, the block was getting bound up in many spots, so there are problems with threads on these replacement parts. Since I have gone so far with the repair, I did not want to put the old broken part back in. What I did is used small files to file down the metal threads on the new shaft. I basically put some taper on the shaft threads and after about 2.5 hours of manual labor, the adjustment block would thread on smoothly without any issues.

Of course, it’s completely asinine to expect a person to file down metal threads to get the part to work. So here comes some mixed news that hopefully will turn into good news soon. This morning I contacted Dorman about my experience and they told me that they know of this issue and the product is supposed to have been put on hold with no further sales taking place until they retool and fix the issue. They were not able to tell me when the new product will be available, but hopefully soon. I left a 3-star review for this product on Amazon, and hopefully, when Dorman gets a new design done I will be able to update it to a 5-star review.

The good news is that there is no need to purchase $200+ new motors and throw out a perfectly good motor with broken plastic gear. The Dorman kit cost me $35 shipped from RockAuto, the kit includes both tilt and telescoping motor shafts. The R&R of the motor, given a proper shaft, is no more than 30 mins and that is taking things apart slowly. I can do it in 5mins now. For crafty guys, the threads on these shafts are M10 x 2.0. I don’t have a die or thread chaser this size, as a matter of fact, it’s a very oddball size that’s not easily gotten.

I do have some pics, but frankly, between the TSB and Dorman manual, you should have no issues taking things out and putting it all together.

Old nylon gear broke, chunk of it is missing

New Dorman gear side by side with old one

Old gear, notice that the shaft threads have a small taper to them. The gear also still has the bearing (shiny silver disk) still on it.

Tilt motor completely disassembled in the wise.

Tilt motor reassembled with new shaft.

Update

A follow-up on my repair. Sometime last fall I had an issue with my repaired tilt motor. One morning it just gave out, but the next day resumed its function. I opted to simply adjust the steering wheel and turn off the easy-entry function.

I was not sure what was wrong with the motor and thought that perhaps the motor itself is giving out. The telescoping motor died sometime earlier, don’t recall when exactly. After the initial repair in 2015, I did receive an “updated” part from Dorman in 2016. That kit was on the shelf until yesterday.

Since I got time on my hands, I decided to fix both motors. Followed my own links to get the motors out, but ran into an issue with removing the telescoping motor out. Mine died in a position that was very close to the dash, preventing easy motor removal.

The procedure explains that you want to pull on the steering wheel while actuating the motor to completely telescope/retract it out. I was not successful in that procedure. What I did instead was used a prybar between the white bushing and the rest of the steering column. It did not require much effort and applying prybar pressure while actuating the motor accomplished the task. Note that the motor had to be bolted in while performing the task.

On the positive side, I had no issues whatsoever with redesigned Dorman parts this time around. Both shafts were a perfect match for factory threads and no time had to be wasted to file anything down. I can wholeheartedly recommend the Dorman kit vs buying new factory motors or even salvage ones. Again, the most important part is to mark the relative position of how parts are put together prior to disassembly. After replacing the shafts, just realign things to the marks that you made and preloads will be perfect.