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Engine, Trans, F/I & Tuning

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Owner: Charis Cacal

Year: 2005
Model: Altima
Color: Charcoal
Transmission: 6-Speed Manual
Trim: SE-R

Mod List:

  • 2005 Altima SE-R 6MT
  • 2014 Maxima Motor
  • 105mm Holley Plenum Top
  • 102mm LS Throttle Body
  • 4″ Intake
  • Genuine Nissan GT-R Injectors
  • AEM 50-1200 E85 In-Tank Fuel Pump
  • SR*S headers (No Cats), 3″ Exhaust w/ 3″ Resonators, and Dual Borla Mufflers
  • NGK 93026 DILKAR8A8 Laser Iridium Spark Plugs—Heat Range: 8

 

There was a time where 6-speed swaps for the Nissan Maxima were only available for 4thgens, 5thgens and 6thgens. After 2006, Nissan no longer offered manual transmission options. All-new Maxima’s now come with the CVT transmission. While the CVT provides a smoother ride and improved fuel economy, it definitely takes away from the 4DSC experience.

But don’t worry. Those times have certainly and FINALLY changed. The 6-speed swap is now officially available for the 7thgen Nissan Maxima (2009-2015). We consider the 7GM 6-speed the true meaning of a 4DSC. It has a balance of power, luxury and comfort.

These types of projects are the ones that fuel the community into modding their Nissan Maxima’s. The Maxima world was quiet for a few years and thanks to these guys and shops, the Maxima community is back and better than ever! So who will be the next swap? Be sure to keep us posted.

The full parts list for the swap can be found here: https://www.my4dsc.com/official-7thgen-nissan-maxima-6-speed-swap-parts-list-2009-2015/

 7GM 6-Speed Swap (Dan Evans)

Platinum Auto Works 7GM 6-Speed Swap (Catalin Vint)

Gerson Flores & Sunday Ortiz 7GM 6-Speed Swap

Randy Heinlin’s 7GM 6-Speed Swap

Member Credit:  Sunday Ortiz & Gerson Flores

This is only intended for a providing a reference to the list of core parts used in the 7GM 6-Speed swap that was successfully completed by Gerson Flores & Sunday Ortiz. It’s not a how-to or step-by-step process. Please only attempt to do the swap if you are mechanically inclined and understand the Nissan FSM (Factory Service Manuals).

View all 7GM 6-Speed Swaps using the links below:

Full Parts List:

Please note that all of these items were purchased brand with the exception of a few parts (custom & discontinued parts). The total cost for all the parts below adds up to approximately $4,522.00. You may be able to find parts for much less and save money. 

 

Photos:

Video:

 

 

 Community Member Credit: tatanko

 (vs. USDM 4th Gen)

 Although not many have completed this swap thus far, it has proven itself to be a far more potent solution than the MEVI. The MEVI, however, has it’s own advantages.

Advantages

00VI…

  • Low RPM power. Rather than lose power at low RPM’s over the USDM manifold, the 00VI actually gains a significant bit of power.
  • Midrange and high RPM power. Although the 00VI and MEVI are both variable manifolds, the difference in operation and design simply allows the 00VI to outflow and outperform the MEVI even as RPMs climb, resulting in even higher peak numbers.
  • Ease of finding parts. Because the 00VI was used as OEM equipment on 2000 and 2001 Maximas in the US, parts are easily accessible at a Nissan dealer or in junkyards.

MEVI…

  • Ease of installation. The MEVI has many similarities to the USDM manifold in terms of design and layout, and was meant for a 4th gen engine. It is basically a bolt-on part.
  • History. Simply put, people have been using the MEVI on their cars for years and years and there is lots of experience and knowledge regarding it.
  • Parts. Almost all of the parts off of your current 4th gen can be re-used with the MEVI.

Disadvantages

00VI…

  • Installation and preparation. The 00VI is simply a much more daunting task. It requires modification to the manifold, wiring work, many custom parts, and a lot of time.
  • History. Or it’s lack thereof. The 00VI swap is still relatively new (by comparison) and very few people have done it.
  • Parts. Almost nothing from your 4th gen manifold can be re-used, and even re-using your stock 4th gen intake becomes a task that involves ordering parts.

MEVI…

  • Power. It doesn’t make as much peak power, and you actually lose low RPM power as a result of it’s design.
  • Parts. They are hard to come by, and often must be ordered expensively through a Nissan dealer and require a good wait to get, due to the manifold never appearing on US Maximas.

On the Dyno

Boosted…
(Stephen Max’s car: 14.3 tq, 13.2 hp over MEVI and gains from 2500 rpm to 7000 rpm)
All Motor…
(BSwithTF’s car: 11.45 tq, 8.61 hp over MEVI, and gains at every rpm)

200 WHP vs. 200 WHP
(jenk01SE’s car [00VI] vs. Zack342’s car [MEVI])

Community Member Credit: Sdot82 / tatanko

As of right now, there are primarily eight different ways to do this swap. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages, which will be discussed. They are as follows:

1) -00 upper manifold
-00 lower manifold
-00 fuel rail*
-00 injectors*
-00 throttlebody
-00 IACV
-00 EGR guide tube**
-00 rear valve cover***
-00 rear coil packs***

»Pros: Probably the least amount of work/customizing (and if you can find it all on one car, the easiest to compile parts for/possibly cheapest), throttlebody doesn’t require block-off.
»Cons: Requires tuning due to larger injectors, requires work to adapt the fuel rail to the old lines, the 00 IACV is iffy at best on the 4th gen ECU.

2) -00 upper manifold
-00 lower manifold
-00 fuel rail*
-00 injectors*
-00 throttlebody (requires block-off plate in this setup)
-4th gen IACV (needs adaptor plate)
-00 EGR guide tube**
-00 rear valve cover***
-00 rear coil packs***

»Pros: Second least amount of work/customizing (and if you can find most of it on one car, easier to compile parts for/cheaper), possibly superior IACV setup (not proven), throttlebody needs block-off plate.
»Cons: Requires tuning due to larger injectors, requires work to adapt the fuel rail to the old lines, IACV needs adapter plate, throttlebody needs a block-off plate.

3) -00 upper manifold
-00 lower manifold
-00 fuel rail*
-00 injectors*
-Pathfinder throttlebody (needs adaptor plate)
-4th gen IACV (needs adaptor plate)
-00 EGR guide tube**
-00 rear valve cover***
-00 rear coil packs***

»Pros: Lesser amount of work/customizing (and if you can find most of it on one car, easier to compile parts for/cheaper), possibly superior IACV setup (not proven), larger throttlebody, throttlebody doesn’t require block-off.
»Cons: Requires tuning due to larger injectors, requires work to adapt the fuel rail to the old lines, IACV needs adapter plate, throttlebody needs adapter plate.

4) -00 upper manifold
-00 lower manifold
-00 fuel rail*
-00 injectors*
-4th gen throttlebody (needs adaptor plate)
-4th gen IACV (needs adaptor plate)
-00 EGR guide tube**
-00 rear valve cover***
-00 rear coil packs***

»Pros: Lesser amount of work/customizing (and if you can find most of it on one car, easier to compile parts for/cheaper), possibly superior IACV setup (not proven), throttlebody doesn’t require block-off.
»Cons: Requires tuning due to larger injectors, requires work to adapt the fuel rail to the old lines, IACV needs adapter plate, throttlebody needs adapter plate.

5) -00 upper manifold
-4th gen lower manifold****
-4th gen fuel rail
-4th gen injectors
-00 throttlebody
-00 IACV
-00 EGR guide tube**
-00 rear valve cover***
-00 rear coil packs***

»Pros: Doesn’t require tuning, throttlebody doesn’t require block-off.
»Cons: IACV needs adapter plate, IACV is iffy at best on 4th gen ECU, lower manifold must be drilled.

6) -00 upper manifold
-4th gen lower manifold****
-4th gen fuel rail
-4th gen injectors
-4th gen throttlebody (needs adaptor plate)
-4th gen IACV (needs adaptor plate)
-00 EGR guide tube**
-00 rear valve cover***
-00 rear coil packs***

»Pros: Doesn’t require tuning, possibly superior IACV setup (not proven), throttlebody doesn’t require block-off.
»Cons: IACV needs adapter plate, lower manifold must be drilled, throttlebody needs adapter plate.

7) -00 upper manifold
-4th gen lower manifold****
-4th gen fuel rail
-4th gen injectors
-00 throttlebody (requires block-off plate in this setup)
-4th gen IACV (needs adaptor plate)
-00 EGR guide tube**
-00 rear valve cover***
-00 rear coil packs***

»Pros: Doesn’t require tuning, possibly superior IACV setup (not proven).
»Cons: IACV needs adapter plate, lower manifold must be drilled, throttlebody must have a block-off plate.

8) -00 upper manifold
-4th gen lower manifold****
-4th gen fuel rail
-4th gen injectors
-Pathfinder throttlebody (needs adaptor plate)
-4th gen IACV (needs adaptor plate)
-00 EGR guide tube**
-00 rear valve cover***
-00 rear coil packs***

»Pros: Doesn’t require tuning, possibly superior IACV setup (not proven), larger throttlebody.
»Cons: IACV needs adapter plate, lower manifold must be drilled, throttlebody needs adapter plate.

* = can be substituted for 01 QX4 parts, ** = can be removed and replaced with block-off plate, *** = you can grind down the rear coil packs and coil pack bosses instead of using these parts, **** = use of 4th gen lower manifold requires that you turn it 180º

Community Member Credit: CS_AR/ KP11520 / The Wizard / EddyMaxx

The 4thgen Nissan Maxima use two ports for diagnostics. There is a somewhat limited OBD2 port and a fully functional consult port. The consult port is behind the door where the fuses are located on the dash. The OBD2 port is below the dash.

White OB2 Port

  • Located underneath the steering wheel.
  • It gives some basic readings and lets you clear CEL codes.
  • The only reason this port is there is for State Inspection diagnostics (required by law in the US) and although does offer some functionality, was never meant to be the port to diagnose and manage 4th Gen Maximas.
  • There are no advanced diagnostics or functionality using this method.

Grey CONSULT Port

  • The CONSULT port is where all the functionality resides.
  • The Consult port and communicate with the engine, transmission, ABS, and SRS modules, but not the BCM unfortunately.
  • Nissan DataScan I software works with the CONSULT port not the OBD2 port.
  • Port Reference:

Additional Info

  • If you want your “meat and potatoes” and to be able to communicate with the ABS and SRS, the Autel 619 plus the consult connector and cable may be your best bet.
  • With the new cable and connector, you can connect through the Consult port and communicate with the engine, transmission, ABS, and SRS modules, but not the BCM unfortunately.
  • So, for anyone reading this and planning on using the MD802 only on a 95-99 Maxima, an option to save some money is to go for the Autel 619 instead. It can communicate with the engine; and the ABS and SRS (no transmission) assuming you spend the extra $39 for the consult adapter connector and the male-to-male cable. The Autel AL619 is quite a bit cheaper than the MD802.
  • Make sure your terminals are the same as the 802 that I have. Meaning, they’ll both be 15 pins and the same shape, but your 619 could have a male fitting where 802 had a female.

Additional Reference Photos

Video Reference using ECUTalk

 

Community Member Credit: CS_AR

I purchased NDSII with the VAG cable in hopes that it would work on the 99 model. The 99 model has unique connect string that I’ve not been able to make work with NDSII. However, I have been able to use NDSII on my neighbor’s 5th gen. It was a “by the book setup” on a 5th gen that worked without issue. NDSII does not show support for 4th gens that I’ve seen so there is nothing misleading as far as I’m concerned. Though I have a nice piece of diagnostic software for neighborhood use now.

I bought a Consult 3 clone from China (comes with software and PC interface cable). It did not work. Beware of ODBII tool selling web sites in China with the smiling call center girls. There is nobody there to help or answer your email when the product fails to work. Money down the drain.

I purchased an ELM327 wireless module to use with NDS for Android. ELM327 appears to work with a product named Torque Lite — but it was difficult to make a connection. It really has no diagnostics that I need. Money down the drain.

I bought software from the UK that was advertised to work and provide a NATS PIN code generator and older Consult 3 version. It was advertized to work with the cable that came with the Consult 3 package from China. Money down the drain.

NOTE: None of these products will reset NATS.

Products I own that WORK on a 4th gen:

1) ECUTalk with Cable. This product was developed to work with the ODB1 Consult port pin diagram in the picture below. I have tested the Cable and the free ECUTalk software on my 1991 ODB1 Nissan in addition to a 1995, 1997 and 1999 Maxima and I30. While 4th gens are ODBII cars, they the came equipped with a Consult OBD1 style port.

2) Nissan Data Scan I (The Original) with the ECUTalk Cable. After I learned how to use the ECUTalk product above, I wanted to conduct a power balance test. I purchased NDS1 realized it works with great with the ECUTalk cable. There is a help document to describe how to connect NDS1 for a 99 model and 4th gen. To use NDS1, you’ll need to find the Ecu ID (Find ECU button) to get the code to insert in the EcuID (Hex Code) data element. Also, I had to check the 96 z32 box and use the connection string for a 1996 300ZX. IIRC the 4th gen uses the same connect string as the 1996 300ZX.

3) El cheapo ($49) OBD2 code reader from Harbor Freight. I’ve reset more codes with that orange handheld unit than I can remember on cars from Chevy to Toyota. With a good working ODB2 code reset and reader device you can definitely win friends and influence people.

Community Member Credit: CS_AR

This afternoon I installed an NWP Engine Torque Link on the 98 GLE automatic. Installation was quick and easy. NWP does a “first-class” job on packaging and instructions for this product.

I’ve been running an NWP torque bar on the 99 SE 5-MT for 3 years. It really provides a nice tight feel and practically eliminates any engine rock during take-off and downshifting.

For the 98 models GLE automatic, it gives a more direct feel and eliminated some of the sloppy feelings that comes from engine movement with an automatic. I now feel more connected to the engine when driving — like it has a little more torque. Any wheel hop that it had before the installation is now unnoticeable.

The engine mounts are in very good shape on both cars. By reducing engine rock, I believe these torque links help extend the life of engine mounts.

Here’s a picture below.