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This is just a quick guide for those upgrading to R35 GTR injectors. They are many fakes out there in the market. While some have had success with the fakes, the majority have experienced issues. These injectors are most commonly used for running E85 on Nissan Maxima builds.

Your best chance is to buy them used from someone who can verify they are genuine. However, if you ever plan to boost the car, it doesn’t make sense to buy the GTR injectors new because for about the same price you can get a set of new Injector Dynamics injectors that are good for more fuel delivery.

The real/authentic injector is on the left. The fake/knock-off injector is on the right.

Additional Video Reference

 

 

Community Member Credit: TRoy Otf

If you have a mail-in performance-tuned ECU from Nisformance with advanced map selection features, below are the steps to activate it:

  1. Hold COAST SET
  2. While holding COAST SET hit the CANCEL button x number of times to select desired tune (1 through 5).

For example, to set map #2 you would hold COAST SET hit the CANCEL button 2 times. The SET indicator will flash two times to let you know you have selected map # 2.

 

Owner: Terrance Herrera

Year: 2006
Model: Altima
Current Color: Smoke
Transmission: 6-Speed Manual
Trim: SE-R

Dyno Results

  • 376 WHP / 425 TQ @ 4.8 PSI  on E85 Octane
  • 601 WHP / 603 TQ @ 13.2 PSI on E85 Octane
  • Tuned By Richard Williams aka “Dry”

Mod List:

  • 2010 Gen2 VQ35DE
  • Holley Hi-Ram Upper Intake Manifold (Using Caleb Adapter)
  • ID 1000cc Injectors
  • Haltech ECU
  • Quantum Fuel Pump (E85 Compatible)
  • Custom Fuel Rails & Fuel Return System with External Fuel Pressure Regulator
  • Audi/Volkswagen Coilpack conversion.
  • OBX Headers mated to Custom Turbo Up-Pipe.
  • Custom Intercooler Piping
  • Universal Oil Cooler Kit
  • Custom 3″ Single Exit Exhaust System
  • Red Lion Racing Engine Mounts
  • Boost Junkies Gtx3582r, 44mm Wastegate, Blow off Valve & Vacuum Manifold
  • OEM HLSD Upgrade
  • Fidanza Single Mass Flywheel
  • Spec Stage 3 Clutch Kit
  • Unorthodox Racing Crank Pulley
  • BC Coilovers
  • Racing Line rear swap and end links
  • Wilwoods front & Akebono rear
  • SPC Rear Toe Arms
  • Racing Line Traction Arms
  • Greddy Profec B Boost Controller
  • Tuned By Richard Williams aka “Dry”

Community Member Credit: Eddy

This is a very detailed post for those who want to understand the different solenoids on the 2016+ VQ35DE engine. This is also helpful to those who want to use both IVT and EXT and need help identifying which solenoids to use. Have seen some cases of members doing Gen3 swaps and not using the correct solenoids. #knowledgeispower

Definitions

IVT = Intake Variable Timing
IVT-ILC = Intake Variable Timing – Intermediate Lock Control
EVT – Exhaust Variable Timing

The 2016+ Maxima incorporates a Continuously Variable Valve Timing Control System for both the intake and exhaust camshafts. Using inputs from various engine sensors (engine speed, coolant temperature, camshaft position, etc.), the ECM controls the camshaft position using pulse width signals (duty signals) to four solenoid valves. This makes it possible to control the shut/open timing of the intake valve to increase engine torque in low/mid speed range and output in high-speed range.

  • Two Intake Valve Timing (IVT) control solenoid valves (one for each intake camshaft)
  • Two Exhaust Valve Timing (EVT) control solenoid valves (one for each exhaust camshaft)

50% Pulse Width:

At 50% pulse width, oil flow to both hydraulic chambers is blocked. Any oil pressure in the hydraulic chambers is retained. The camshaft is retained in the current position.

Pulse Width Higher Than 50%:

At pulse width above 50%, Pressure A oil flow is allowed into the Advance Hydraulic Chamber, operating the camshaft timing in the advance direction. The amount of oil flow/pressure is continuously variable based on the pulse width from the ECM.

Pulse Width Lower Than 50%:

At pulse width below 50%, Pressure B oil flow is allowed into the Retard Hydraulic Chamber, operating the camshaft in the retard direction. The amount of oil flow/pressure is continuously variable based on the pulse width from the ECM.

IVT System Diagram / Valve Timing Control Photo

EVT System Diagram / Valve Timing Control Photo

 

The intake valve timing intermediate lock control improves the cleaning ability of exhaust gas at cold starting. To help control cold-start emissions, the intake valve timing intermediate lock is used to fix the intake camshaft sprocket with two lock keys, keeping the intake camshaft timing at the intermediate phase while the engine is cold.

When the engine coolant reaches normal operating temperature, oil pressure from the oil switching valve overcomes the spring pressure and the lock keys are disengaged. The control vane is free to move the camshaft to the advance or retard phase, based on oil pressure from the oil control.

  • Cam phase is fixed at the intermediate phase by two lock keys in the camshaft sprocket (INT). Lock key 1 controls retard position and lock key 2 controls advance position.
  • ECM controls the intermediate phase lock by opening/closing the intake valve timing intermediate lock control solenoid valve to control oil pressure acting on the lock key and locking/unlocking the lock key.

Lock/Unlock Activation

When ECM activates the intake valve timing intermediate lock control solenoid valve, oil pressure generated in the oil pump is drained through the oil pressure path in the control valve. Since oil pressure is not acted on the lock key, the lock key position is fixed by the spring tension and the cam phase is fixed at the intermediate phase.

When ECM deactivates the intake valve timing intermediate lock control solenoid valve, unlocking oil pressure acts on each lock key. Lock key 1 is not released because it is under load due to sprocket rotational force. For this reason, lock key 2 is released first by being pushed up by unlocking oil pressure. When lock key 2 is released, some clearance is formed between lock key 1 and the rotor due to sprocket rotational force and return spring force. Accordingly, lock key 1 is pushed up by unlocking oil pressure and the intermediated phase lock is released.

The intermediate lock is controlled by the ECM using the intake valve timing intermediate lock control solenoid valve as follows:

  • A. When the engine is turned OFF (ignition switch is turned to the OFF position), the ECM turns ON the solenoid valve for a short time to drain oil pressure from the lock keys.
  • B. The lock keys are then pushed into the lock position by spring pressure.
  • C. When starting a cold engine, the ECM turns ON the solenoid valve to keep oil pressure drained from the lock keys; the intake camshaft is kept at the intermediate phase.
  • D. When the engine coolant temperature exceeds 140°F (60°C), the ECM turns OFF the solenoid valve, allowing oil pressure to push the lock keys to the unlocked position.
  • E. When the lock keys are in the unlocked position, normal (continuously variable) intake valve timing control is performed via the CVTCS.Note: The intake valve timing intermediate lock control solenoid valve is not a Data Monitor item.

When stopping the engine

When the ignition switch is turned from idle state to OFF, ECM receives an ignition switch signal from BCM via CAN communication and activates the intake valve timing intermediate lock control solenoid valve and drains oil pressure acting on the lock key before activating the intake valve timing control solenoid valve and operating the cam phase toward the advance position.

The cam phase is fixed by the lock key when shifting to the intermediated phase and ECM performs Lock judgment to stop the engine.

When starting the engine When starting the engine by cold start, ECM judges the locked/unlocked state when ignition switch is turned ON. When judged as locked state (fixed at the intermediate phase), the intake valve timing intermediate lock control solenoid valve is activated. Since oil pressure does not act on the lock key even when the engine is started, the cam phase is fixed at the intermediate phase and the intake valve timing control is not performed.

When the engine stops without locking the cam phase at the intermediate phase due to an engine stall and the state is not judged as locked, the intake valve timing intermediate lock control solenoid valve and the intake valve timing control solenoid valve are activated and the cam phase shifts to the advanced position to be locked at the intermediate phase. Even when not locked in the intermediate lock phase due to no oil pressure or low oil pressure, a ratchet structure of the camshaft sprocket (INT) rotor allows the conversion to the intermediate phase in stages by engine vibration.

When engine coolant temperature is more than 60°C, the intake valve timing is controlled by deactivating the intake valve timing intermediate lock control solenoid valve and releasing the intermediate phase lock.

When the engine is started after warming up, ECM releases the intermediate phase lock immediately after the engine start and controls the intake valve timing.

Solenoid Illustrations

  • The solenoids that you will use for your maxima swap are IVT Bank 1 and Bank 2 as highlighted in RED below.
  • The solenoids highlighted in purple are not used.
  • The solenoids in Green can be used if you choose to wire up EVT (a bit more complex).

This is the general diagram simple used by most for their Gen3 VQ35DE swaps.

Owner: Terrance Herrera

Year: 2006
Model: Altima
Current Color: Smoke
Transmission: 6-Speed Manual
Trim: SE-R

Dyno Results

  • 356 WHP / 312 TQ @ 5 PSI  on 93 Octane
  • 466 WHP / 411 TQ @ 9.7 PSI on 93 Octane
  • Tuned By Richard Williams aka “Dry”

Mod List:

  • Gen2 VQ35DE
  • Holley Hi-Ram Upper Intake Manifold (Using Caleb Adapter)
  • ID 1000cc Injectors
  • Haltech ECU
  • Quantum Fuel Pump (E85 Compatible)
  • Custom Fuel Rails & Fuel Return System with External Fuel Pressure Regulator
  • Audi/Volkswagen Coilpack conversion.
  • OBX Headers mated to Custom Turbo Up-Pipe.
  • Custom Intercooler Piping
  • Universal Oil Cooler Kit
  • Custom 3″ Single Exit Exhaust System
  • Red Lion Racing Engine Mounts
  • Boost Junkies Gtx3582r, 44mm Wastegate, Blow off Valve & Vacuum Manifold
  • OEM HLSD Upgrade
  • Fidanza Single Mass Flywheel
  • Spec Stage 3 Clutch Kit
  • Unorthodox Racing Crank Pulley
  • BC Coilovers
  • Racing Line rear swap and end links
  • Wilwoods front & Akebono rear
  • SPC Rear Toe Arms
  • Racing Line Traction Arms
  • Greddy Profec B Boost Controller
  • Tuned By Richard Williams aka “Dry”

Community Member Credit: Victor Dragos

Notes:

  • This is the first 35HR 4gen Auto swap
  • Automatics are finicky (they’re always in gear when driving) so to keep them happy have to use a 4gen IACV
  • So I designed and developed that adapter to manifold for the Auto in this swap. 5spd/6spd use the PFTB IACV.

Community Member Credit: deloa84

  • I just wanted to post some findings that  I found when I did my ECU swap from a 99 to a 95 in my Cali spec emissions car.
  • Now, I used whlimi’s excellent writeup. It was followed by the letter.
  • One of the codes I got was the P1400 or EGRC Solenoid Valve. This was obvious since the EGR design in the 99 Cali is different from previous models.
  • As I was looking through the FSM of the 99 as well as some of the threads regarding the code P1400, I came across the Swirl Control Solenoid valve. It caught my attention because it looked very similar to the EGRC solenoid valve that the 95 ECU uses.

Here is a pic of the Swirl Control Valve

Here is the pic of the EGRC solenoid valve.

They look similar, right?
I even looked at the wiring setup for both. I noticed that they are both in the fuse block number (17) and that they use the same type of connector (circled in red). As I was reading through the operation, diagnosis, etc, they both read the battery voltage and they both work on a vacuum design.

So this lead me to move the light blue/yellow (L/Y) cable on my 99 in pin 71 over to pin 103 in the 95 ECU. The pin on 71 was smaller so I had to use the pin from 117 (fuel pump wire) which was cut in the previous step in the ecu swap.
I checked this morning and NO P1400…..
I also passed emissions as well…

Community Member Credit: schmellyfart

I’ve had this project on the back burner for the better part of the last year and a half, but it is finally done. 75mm TB on an A32 3.5 swap with a functioning IACV.

  • The TB is an aftermarket 75mm TB produced for a 86-93 Mustang, redrilled and clearance to fit the VQ35DE TB bolt pattern, TB mounted upside down to make throttle cable routing a bit easier.
  • The throttle Cable bracket was fabbed from a random aluminum bracket I had previously removed from the car and bolted it to the firewall in place of the cruise control unit (for now).
  • The IACV is a VQ30DE-K IACV Housing with a Pathfinder IACV, mounted onto the TB with an adapter plate I fabbed up.
  • Throttle Cable Pulley is off of a VQ30DE.
  • I wasn’t thrilled with the way the original throttle cable return spring felt, so I replaced it with one from a B14. Note, this spring winds in the opposite direction than the VQ30DE throttle cable return spring.
  • The TPS is a stock 86-93 Mustang TPS wired up to a salvaged A32 TPS connector, making it plug and play.
  • No cruise control, unfortunately. I am currently looking into another 75mm TB where I can retain an IACV and CC.

As expected throttle response is increased, but low-speed driving requires more attention than before as the throttle only needs to be held open 1-2% to maintain speed at 45mph according to my scangaugeII. Though the twitchiness at low speeds could also be attributed to the throttle cable being mounted to the Chassis, rather than the engine – even though I have all 4 poly engine mounts.

Before Port Matching

Everything bead blasted and port matched

75mm Mustang on left, 70mm PFTB on right

Community Member Credit: yellow_cake

As you know may know, the generic short shifters do not come with a bolt. These use roller bearings (what you find in skateboards) and the factory bolt is too large to pass through.

Now, the important thing with this bolt is that the smooth shaft is the right diameter and length to fit into the roller bearings of the new shifter… The rest can be modified from here… See the pic for a description.

The rounding of the hex part is necessary for the bolt to sit snugly in the factory bracket, see the 2 bolts side by side.
I used a dremel type tool to round off the portion of the hex head. It helps to use a new cut off wheel as it’s edges are nice and square and not rounded.

The bolt actually has a round indentation which I used as a guide while grinding.

You’ll need some washers to fill the space as the new shifter is not as wide as the original. Buy a few various thickness washers and see what fits best. Oh, and use a washer before the nut as well.

Important: DO NOT TIGHTEN THE NUT TOO MUCH OR SHIFTING WILL BE STIFF! Just tighten it till it’s snug, then back it off about a 1/2 turn or so. The nylon locking nut will stay in place.

Hope it helps some of the guys who don’t have the cash to buy a brand name shifter with all the complete parts but want it done cheap and right…