Category

my4thgen 95-99

Category

Member Credit: Matt Blehm

Please note that this post is for reference and documentation purposes ONLY. Matt Blehm no longer offers these products or services. Products were available from 2003 to around 2009.

BlehmCo Maxima Big Brake Kits

Front Big Brake Kit #1–2004 Maxima Rotors with 300ZX calipers: This kit fits all 1989 through 2003 models

Front Big Brake Kit #2–2004 Maxima Rotors with OEM 5th generation calipers: This kit only fits 2000 and 2001 models

REAR Big Brake Kit This kit fits all 1995 through 2003 models!

BlehmCo Maxima Front Big Brake Kit

This kit uses easy-to-find, off the shelf ALL Nissan parts! That way the next time you warp a rotor, or wear out the pads at an Auto X, track event, etc…you can just go to the local parts store and pick up replacement parts!  Not many BBKs will allow you to do that!

So what’s in this kit?

  1. NEW OEM 12.6″ 2004 Maxima Rotors (included in the Complete and Basic Kits)
  2. Used/Rebuilt/Remanufactured 300ZX  ALUMINUM  calipers, hardware, pads, shims, etc (included in the Complete Kit).
  3. Caliper relocation bracket
  4. All hardware necessary to install (nuts, bolts, washers, etc.)
  5. Goodridge Stainless Steel brake lines, certified to D.O.T. FMVSS test 106 (many of the brake kits out there don’t have this)

As noted above, the kit is offered with and without the 300ZX calipers for those of you who already have some, or have a good source for them already. If you’d like me to source them for you, then prices are at the bottom of the page.

What are the benefits to this Big Brake Kit?

You guys already know the benefits of a big brake kit on your car, so I’ll point out the original parts of this kit…

It uses a NISSAN rotor that’s meant to fit on this suspension. The offsets are correct so as not to cause huge wheel clearance issues, the hub bore is a perfect fit, and the wheel stud holes are a perfect fit. It also doesn’t rub on the control arms (at least not on 3rd or 5th gens).

As most of you know, the 300ZX calipers have a plethora of pad selections out there–WAY more than the Maxima does because of the performance enthusiast base. You can go with Raybestos, Wagner, Axxis, or comparable pads for the street for a very reasonable price, or you can bump up to Hawk, Performance Friction, Porterfield, Ferodo, EBC, and many other higher performance pads for track days. If you’re in a pinch and need new pads “NOW!”, simply drive to your nearest parts store and pick some up! They’re extremely handy, as opposed to other aftermarket calipers where you usually have to order pads and wait a week for them to come in! These calipers are also designed for street use in that they have dust seals, pad shims to keep road noise to a minimum, easily obtainable rebuild kits, and all the other low maintenance benefits of a caliper designed for years of street use instead of a caliper designed to be rebuilt several times per race season.

The rotors are currently available through OEM sources (dealer), and you can also get blank, slotted, crossdrilled, or slotted and drilled from www.irotors.com. You have all kinds of choices and I will leave that up to you, but I DO NOT recommend crossdrilled rotors due to their tendency to crack. There is enough information in thousands of other places on these issues, so I won’t bother repeating them.

What wheels will these fit under?

I have tried this kit with several wheels so you can get an indication of what will fit…. These kits DO NOT FIT UNDER THE STOCK 17″ Maxima wheels! So far, every aftermarket 17″ and 18″ wheel I have tried will fit, but the 17s get close on spoke clearance–depending on wheel design. I am currently trying to compile a database of all of the wheels that fit these kits to give you an idea, but the best way is to simply measure for yourself. I make no claims to wheel fittment, but for a general guess on if they will fit or not, use these measurements:

Measure 5 1/4″ out from the center of the wheel to one of your spokes. Now measure the distance from the surface of your stock rotors. If you have at least 2 1/2″ of clearance here, then you should be fine with the kit. I can tell you for certain that 300ZX (Z32) wheels will NOT fit without a 1/2″ spacer.

The installed kit:

For those that want to see more up close pics showing caliper clearance around the wheel and spokes, click here

And now for the part you’re really interested in–prices!

Complete Kit: $765 + shipping

This kit is ready to bolt on, with the exception of brake fluid. This kit includes:

  1. Remanufactured 300ZX Calipers
  2. New OEM 2004 Maxima rotors
  3. Custom Stainless Steel Brake lines–these lines are custom made to adapt the 300ZX caliper fittings to the Maxima hard line.
  4. Caliper relocation brackets
  5. All hardware necessary to install the kit

Basic kit: $440 + shipping

Note that this kit does NOT include the required calipers. I can get them if you wish, or you can supply them yourself. This kit includes:

  1. New OEM 2004 Maxima rotors
  2. Custom Stainless Steel Brake lines- These lines are custom made to adapt the 300ZX caliper fittings to the Maxima hard line.
  3. Caliper relocation brackets
  4. All hardware necessary to install the kit

Kit without Rotors: $200 + shipping

This is for those who want to source rotors, calipers, and pads themselves. This kit includes:

  1. Custom Stainless Steel Brake lines–these lines are custom made to adapt the 300ZX caliper fittings to the Maxima hard line.
  2. Caliper relocation brackets
  3. All hardware necessary to install the kit ( again, this kit does not include rotors or calipers )

Want me to source the 300ZX calipers for you? If so, then I can source just about anything you want:

  1. Parts car pulls (cores)–whatever price I can find them. Current prices range from $150 to $250 per set
  2. Cores rebuilt with OEM seal–core price, plus $60 ($30 of which is the rebuild kit). This price does NOT include new hardware. (Contact me if you want new hardware also)
  3. Remanufactured calipers (loaded with generic semi-metallic pads, shims, pins, and hardware)–$350
  4. I can also do powdercoating for $100 per pair on calipers. Please expect a few weeks of lead time if I have to order powder or calipers for you

BlehmCo Maxima Relocation Big Brake Kit

This kit uses easy-to-find, off the shelf ALL Nissan parts! That way the next time you warp a rotor, or wear out the pads at an Auto X, track event, etc…you can just go to the local parts store and pick up replacement parts!  Not many BBKs will allow you to do that!

What is this kit designed for?

This kit is designed for the average “spirited” driver to alleviate the rotor warpage issues that are so common on 5th Gen Maximas. It’s also an extremely affordable way to improve the cosmetics of your car if you’re running larger wheels. The factory brakes just look too small under 18″ and 19″ wheels! The other goal was to make them fit under the factory 17″ wheels–which this kit does with ease!

Not many BBKs will allow get anywhere near the price of this kit, nor will there be easily available replacement parts when it’s time to replace pads or rotors.

I tried this kit with several wheels, so you can get an indication of what will fit: So far, every 17″ and 18″ wheel I have tried will fit, but the 17s get close on rim clearance–depending on wheel design. I make no claims to wheel fittment, but I would say it’s safe to assume that most 17″ wheels will fit, and sure any 18″ wheel will also.

Here are several pictures of the kit, installed on Mike Hill’s gorgeous 2000 Maxima:

And now for the part you’re really interested in–prices!

Ready to Install Kit: $365 + shipping

This includes:

  1. New OEM 2004 Maxima rotors (aftermarket crossdrilled or slotted rotors are now available for an additional $20)
  2. Caliper relocation brackets
  3. All hardware necessary to install the kit (nuts, bolts, & washers)

Complete kit, without rotors: $150 + shipping.

This includes:

  1. Caliper relocation brackets
  2. All hardware necessary to install the kit (nuts, bolts, & washers)

BlehmCo Maxima Big Rear Brake Kit—1995 through 2003 models

This kit uses easy-to-find, off the shelf ALL Nissan parts! That way the next time you warp a rotor, or wear out the pads at an Auto X, track event, etc…you can just go to the local parts store and pick up replacement parts!  Not many BBKs will allow you to do that!

What is it?

Z32 300ZX REAR calipers and rotors built to fit 4th and 5th gen Maximas.

What are the benefits to this Rear Big Brake Kit?

You guys already know the benefits of a big brake kit on your car, so I’ll point out the original parts of this kit…

Many of you that have purchased Big Brake Kits for the front notice a front brake bias problem now. This is safer than having a large rear bias, but it is not the best performing. The rear brakes are tiny and just aren’t up to the task once you’ve upgraded the front brake system. They also look like go kart brakes behind the larger 17″,18″,and 19″ wheels that many owners are using now!

This kit, when paired with most front brake kits, will return the brake bias to within 3% of the factory front/rear bias. In my experiences, this has provided the best overall braking–nearly zero nose dive when you’re on the brakes hard, but you can still brake into corners without locking up the back end.

As most of you know, the 300ZX calipers have a plethora of pad selections out there–WAY more than the Maxima does because of the performance enthusiast base. You can go with Raybestos, Wagner, Axxis, or comparable pads for the street for a very reasonable price, or you can bump up to Hawk, Performance Friction, Porterfield, Ferodo, EBC, and many other higher performance pads for track days. If you’re in a pinch and need new pads “NOW!”, simply drive to your nearest parts store and pick some up! They’re extremely handy, as opposed to other aftermarket calipers where you usually have to order pads and wait weeks for them to come in! These calipers are also designed for street use in that they have dust seals, pad shims to keep road noise to a minimum, easily obtainable rebuild kits, and all the other low maintenance benefits of a caliper designed for years of street use instead of a caliper designed to be rebuilt several times per race season.

You can also purchase rotors at just about any aftermarket or OEM dealer. They have a huge selection of finish, slotting and drilling, and cryo treating options.

How?

For those of you that are familiar with the Z32 brakes, they use an internal drum-type parking brake–as almost all other high performance brake systems do now. This makes caliper maintenance and pad changes extremely quick and easy, but this is also what makes designing a rear brake kit for this car very challenging. I have designed and built a rear drum-type parking brake to fit inside the Z32 rotor, and that’s what this kit is based upon.

Will this work with front Big Brake Kits from another company?

Some of the other kits out there (Stillen, Fastbrakes, Precision, etc) use different piston sizes in their calipers that will affect brake bias considerably. Please check with me before purchasing and be ready to do some measuring of your calipers (or have the part numbers ready for the calipers so I can look them up.) I have talked with Fastbrakes and confirmed the piston sizes on their calipers–their systems will work wonderfully with my rear BBK. I have yet to confirm this with other kits.

If you buy this kit for other front systems, the worst you will have to do is install a $50 brake bias adjuster from Wilwood or Tilton to make this kit run on your car. Simply be very careful about locking up the rear brakes until you have adjusted the bias to fit your system.

How Much does it cost, and what do I need?

I have set the price on my parts so that the entire setup should cost you under $1000 for everything needed to install the kit on the car. I will send you everything needed EXCEPT rear calipers, rotors, and brake fluid, which you will be able to purchase from the sources below and come out under $1000 total.

The parts I will supply are the parking brake assemblies (including custom backing plate and bracket), replacement parking brake cables (your original cables will not work), 6061 aluminum caliper relocation bracket, all fasteners and hardware required for installation, and custom rear DOT approved stainless steel brake lines made to fit this setup.

The parts you need to supply are 300ZX rotors and calipers, pads, and brake fluid. Rotors: Feel free to purchase them from any place you like, but I highly recommend IRotors.com You will need to purchase a pair of REAR rotors from a 1990-1996 300ZX.

Calipers: You can find them quite often on Ebay for under $100 a pair. Any 1990-1996 300ZX TT or N/A rear calipers will work–they’re all the same. If you purchase them used, I highly suggest rebuilding them. You can buy a rebuild kit from Orielly’s Auto Parts, Pep Boys, Autozone, etc for under $10. Many auto parts stores also carry remanufactured calipers for a reasonable cost. In Houston, they are about $100 each without core, $60 each with core.

Now for some Pics!

 

So what’s the total price from BlehmCo?

You will send me $720 plus shipping for the parts you need from me. Shipping usually runs about $20 for anyone in the main 48 states. CA, AK, and HI are more, but I am more than happy to ship worlwide! You will still need to purchase rotors, calipers, pads, and fluid. This should run you less than $250, which puts you at just under $1000 for the entire rear brake kit!

I can also do powdercoating for $100 per pair on calipers. Please expect a few weeks of lead time if I have to order powder or calipers for you.

 

my4dsc: 79

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Member Credit: 96sleeper

I just wanted to put this info out there. When I first did my 3.5 swap I did the fuel setup the way that others had done with the Tee. It satisfied the VQ35 engine by leaving it returnless, and also satisfied the car with the return line.

Ever since running higher boost, I have been battling a little bit of a lean condition at higher rpms in the higher gears. I have tried just about everything, turning the pressure up, added a boost-a-pump, SAFC adjustments, etc. Nothing would fully fix the problem. I thought I had it narrowed down the the fpr not rising 1:1 with boost, but I fixed that and I still had the problem.

I decided to remove the damper on the end of the fuel rail and make it return style and eliminate the tee from the system. Now the fuel has to pass through the fuel rail to be returned to the tank. This seems to have fixed my problem. I can be as rich as I want now at the upper rpms. I don’t know if it was a volume problem flowing through the tee, or if it was just the setup allowing fuel to be returned to the tank without ever seeing the engine. This could have been a problem if the fpr was acting up.

Here is a simple diagram showing before and after.

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my4dsc: 10

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Member Credit: Thomas Perdue aka t6378tp

Ok so I figured it was about that time to start a build thread. I have enough pic’s to keep the thread going for awhile so here we go.

I grabbed a 5spd 4gen from a local member for $500.00 with a stillen exhaust, sts, popcharger, alpine radio and upgraded shocks and struts. My plan was to use it as a daily as gas is high and my current daily was a Armada which sucks.

Bringing home the new ride, all loaded up, the truck towed this like it was nothing there.

Hard to think no one bought this for 500 bucks, WTF is happening to the Maxima game.

Needed to make room for the turbo so I relocated the batter to the trunk

Well I’ve seen worse….

Cut out the rust and boxed it back it

Time to start modding the front motor mount to clear the downpipe and semi-lock it out.

Filled it with window weld

Cut out a template for my semi lockout mod while waiting for the poly to dry

OK now to transfer this to metal

Made a plate for both sides and welded it on
Notched the mount to make room for the downpipe and reinforced it a little

All primed, painted and ready to be installed

Installed a stephenmax pftb to dek adapter plate and ported the neck on the intake to match

IACV removed and filled with jb weld, just need to sand it down and make a cover plate for it. Also made a egr bop too.

VAIS bop, now just need to clean up the edges

OK now for the good stuff

1st part of the feedpipe

Starting on the 3inch dp

Wastegate added

Routed the wastegate back into the exhaust seeing how I hated the sound of a open dump on my old car

Feed and downpipe both runs under the oil pan

Added a support bracket on the dp to the trans mount and started to heat wrap everything with lava wrap

Ok so I don’t have a turbo yet and need to keep this project moving and the car driving to save gas. So I made a turbo bop so I can mount the hotside and still drive the car

Done

Exhaust housing and turbo bop installed now just need to make something to connect the dp to the catback

Another angle

Downpipe on

Made a the second half of the downpipe to connect it to the catback in the stock location. I also added a bullet muffler where the car would have been to help keep the noise down. All I want to hear is turbo spool and bov

I am currently driving the car with the turbo bop and hotside install. Next up is to install the coldside while I’m waiting for my turbo in the mail. My goal is to save the foglights so I cut a hole in the rad support and ran the lower intercooler pipe through it.

Ran into a problem didn’t know the foglight brackets bolt to the bumper support. Got to figure this out

 Retained the bumper support ends, welded some extra support brackets to them and bolted the passenger side on but had to gut the drivers side so I could run the intercooler pipe inside and welded that it on the body.

Painted the intercooler black

Put the bumper cover back on a ran into a new problem

This is how I fixed it, I extended the light harness and moved the bulb from the center to the end of the lens

How it looks with the bumper back on

Tinted the fogs

Added a stillen front lip

Running the rest of the intercooler piping

Made a intercooler pipe bead roller so I don’t have to keep running to the shop

Intercooler piping from turbo to intercooler is done and rolled, yep one pipe that’s it
3″ intake pipe so I can retain the IACV

Rolled

Solid one piece cattman MAF adapter

Turbo came so I ran the intercooler piping to the tb
Found a good deal on some coilovers with one blown strut so I sold my blues and stechs

Had to make some brake line brackets out of some sheet metal I had sitting around

Scored some 5.5gen calipers, brackets, pads and rotors for cheap

4gen vs 5.5gen

 

All buttoned up

So I dropped the car another 1/2inch all around over the stechs for a total of 2.75 front and 2.3 rear

Another angle

The stock drivers seat had a tear in the leather and I couldn’t find a decent replacement for less than 100 bucks. So I got a pair of these with sliders for 258shipped

Since no one makes brackets for a decent price and I had no clue if the ones I found would fit these seats I made my own brackets out of the OEM seats

Welded the brackets directly to the seats

 

All buttoned up, just need to figure out the seat belts now

New gauge pod with a wb02 and vac/boost gauge

Turbo came, gps gt35, t4, off center, 3inch vband dp, .68 exhaust ar

The pftb, 2013 GTR injectors, vias bop, ported 00vi, cleaned, painted and ready to be installed
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1st up timing cover

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So I treated myself to a racing jacket, another vafc2 since mine took a crap and going to upgrade some of my intercooler piping from 2.5 to 3inch

New engine bay pics with 3inch intercooler piping, more deleting, cleaning and polishing

Did some painting too

Aas you can see I blew my MAF apart which is common but nothing rtv and zip ties can’t fix, lol
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ditched the crappy looking rusty oem rad brackets for these
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finally scored a pathfinder bose radio
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ordered a meth kit
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Went to a dyno meet the following day and made 300hp on 7psi with the spark blowing out

 

my4dsc: 293

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Member Credit: Tavarish

*VERY IMPORTANT** Make sure you have the wiring harness, or else this will be impossible.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

Then I test fit it with the stock mounts. Don’t try this. It will NOT fit at all. What I did was take off the stock 5th gen mounts with pliers (they snap right off), and sawed the top one off. (I didn’t use it.)

What I did is i got a spare bezel I had laying around, and put the lower mounting holes on from that. I attached them with JB weld.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

Then I mounted it. PERFECT fit. Not 100% OEM, but no one will be able to tell.

Now here comes the fun part: wiring. I made a custom wiring diagram by looking at both FSM’s, and playing connect the dots. It was pretty easy, you just have to double check each wire is the correct one you’re splicing.

Click the image to open in full size.

It was about 29 wires altogether, I got rid of wires like ABS and Cruise, since I no longer have/need that in my car. I don’t have TCS, so that went as well.

Always test it after the first few wires to see you’re on the right track. I did the power wires then the illumination wires to see if it lit up and turned on.

Click the image to open in full size.

Then just finish up the wiring, bolt it down, and hopefully everything comes together.

Here’s the finished product:

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

my4dsc: 42

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Member Credit: ViperVadim

The purpose of this thread is to compare the available headers for the 95-03 VQ3x Maximas. I’ve managed to get together the following different headers in the same room and do this comparison.

Click the image to open in full size.I was able to pull it off thanks to:

  • speed racer for SSAuto/XS Power
  • secondtonone317 for OBX
  • M&R MAX for Hotshots
  • Maximariceboi for Cattmans
  • tavarish for the Stock Fed Spec header (thanks to qnzmax too)

Let the comparison begin:

Stock for Stock (Federal Emissions vs California Emissions)

There are the two types of Stock VQ front headers:

  • 95-00 Federal Emissions Header
  • 99-00 California and ALL 2001+ Header

Click the image to open in full size.The California front header is a system that incorporates a Huge pre-cat (cat converter) doing it’s job for the environment.

Click the image to open in full size.

The pre-cat up close is big, and the stock headers are restrictive to the exhaust gasses flowing through.

Click the image to open in full size.

The front headers kinda look similar, until you look inside them.

Click the image to open in full size.

The fed spec has a round exit hole and has superior internal flow to the Cali-spec, the shape of the openning on the cali spec is irregular, and more restrictive.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

The bends and rough edges inside the manifold all hinder exhaust flow, creating backpressure.

Furthermore the outlet after the pre-cat on the cali spec is much smaller than the fed, with an oxygen sensor placed directly in the exhaust path restricting even more flow.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

Tthe rear VQ header is unchanged from 95-01.(EGR is closed off with a Large Bolt on all 01’s) But in 02+ ALL rear headers also received a pre-cat similar to the california front header in 99.

Here is a pic of 02+ rear header pre-cat, used from BLAKKILLA.GTR, thanks Man

Click the image to open in full size.

Now everybody knows what all maximas come with from the factory. As you can see from the pictures the Stock headers are designed very cost effectively, they comply with auto standards and compromise heavily between good Fuel Economy and power output. (Very Bad for HorsePower)

Before we discuss Aftermarket Headers we need to discuss:

EGR: Which cars have EGR?

  • All 95-00 Maximas Have external EGR.
  • All 01-03 Maximas have NO (external) EGR.

This is the EGR guide tube used on all 95-00.
Click the image to open in full size.

This is how the EGR bolts into the REAR header – and why you need the EGR bung on the rear header.
Click the image to open in full size.

GASKETS

Aftermarket Headers will come with Aftermarket Gaskets (read as: POS Gaskets).

The difference between POS and OEM

Click the image to open in full size.

DO NOT USE the supplied POS Gaskets! They cannot stand up to the heat of the headers. The gaskets are prone to cracking. OEM gaskets are multi-layered Steel and provide the best seal.

Click the image to open in full size.

OEM Multilayer FTW!

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

XS Power/SSAutochrome/Stone Mountain Racing Headers

These are the very first headers designed and mass produced for the maxima, it has went trough many names, but not so many changes, the latest distributor is XS Power.
This is the only system that can be used with a Budget/Cattman/Warpspeed y-pipe, meaning if you already have a (Fed Spec) aftermarket y-pipe, the headers will bolt right up to it. I still prefer to use the Supplied XS Power Y-pipe (for ideal fitment)

Cost $325 

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

They are derived from the stock header design except they have a nice flow improvement. every runner is separate, and merges into a 3-1 collector. They have much better flow over stock.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

This is the flow improvement, you can see the 3-1 collector.

Click the image to open in full size.

The rear header has longer runners than the front with EGR bung as well

Click the image to open in full size.

Fresh from vipervadim’s paint shop

Click the image to open in full size.

However when comparing them to the header system from OBX you can clearly see the difference between long and short runners.

Click the image to open in full size.

With short runners, peak power is delivered earlier in the powerband. low-end and midrange is emphasized. (at top-end the headers are choking the motor)

with longer runners, peak power is delivered later in the rpm range. Midrange and Top-end power are affected better since the engine has less backpressure and less restriction for exhaust gasses.

Stats:

Header:
A. Runner Inlet (oval) 1 3/4W x 1 1/4H
B. Runner Diameter (outer) – 1 5/8in
C. Runner Length – Front (5, 5 1/2, 10 1/2) Rear (7, 8, 8 1/2) in
D. 3-1 Collector Diameter (inner) – 2 1/8 in

Y-Pipe
E. Y-Pipe Diameter (outer) – 2 1/8 -> 2 3/8in.
F. Collector Diameter (inner) – 2 1/4
G. Not Equal Length W/ EGR

OBX

OBX is not new to Maxima headers, they used to have this (below) header system for the 95-99 Maxima, 3-piece design, however they had a big fitment problem: the front header was right in the way of the front motor mount bracket (needed to be cut), and the rear header joined the y-pipe in a 90 degree bend (bad exhaust flow).

 I WOULD NOT Advise buying it because of Bad Fitment.

OBX has however smartened up from ^^those times^^ and completely redesigned their New Maxima Header System (fits 95-03, same VQ block) and this is what they offer:

Cost – $325 

Click the image to open in full size.

They have improved from the original header design, redesigning the whole system. the new design is now 2-piece. It incorporates long runners in the front header, with the mount issue solved (similar to hotshots design), and a distinctly improved 2-1 collector, eliminating the previous 90-degree bend. the rear header (with EGR bung) is integrated into the y-pipe as one piece

Click the image to open in full size.

This is how the system looks put together.

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Notice there are 4 o2 bungs for the front and rear oxygen sensors (ideal for 99+ cali spec), there is also 2 small flex sections instead of a single.

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I am very impressed with the OBX, they officially put themselves back on the map with their new redesigned Maxima headers. for the price and the end-result, this is the ideal header system for a ‘budget minded’ maxima enthusiast. I think the SSAuto/XS Power have met their downfall, because the OBX are in a similar price range offering a better designed system similar to (cattman and hotshot). I still have yet to find out how well they fit or how well they perform.

However the new OBX has it’s one drawback. unlike the Cattman and Hotshot and even the SSauto/XS Power Y-pipes, the inside diameter of the y-pipe outlet is only 2 1/16in, (outside diameter 2 1/8) smaller than stock.

Click the image to open in full size.

If you can replace the flex section and the outlet piece with 2.5in piping more gains will be had in the midrange and top-end.

Stats:

Header:
A. Runner Inlet (oval) 1 3/4W x 1 1/4H
B. Runner Diameter (outer) – 1 5/8in
C. Runner Length – Front (9 1/2, 11, 14 1/2) Rear (9 1/2, 10 3/4, 12) in
D. 3-1 Collector Diameter (inner) – 2 1/16 in

Y-Pipe
E. Y-Pipe Diameter (outer) – 2 1/8 -> 2 1/8in.
F. Collector Diameter (inner) – 2 1/16
G. Not Equal Length, W/ EGR

Hotshot

Hotshot is Out Of Business, so the Headers are no longer produced. There are some resellers who still have the last remaining stock, and of course the people who bought/installed them.

Cost $639 

Hotshot headers are on par with Cattman. they look very similar and the construction is very good. According to my measurements the Hotshots have the longest header runners and longer equal length runners on the y-pipe. They also have well machined inlet and oulets.

Click the image to open in full size.

The only problem with Hotshots: In the Front header, the O2 bung needs to be welded in another location. The original location puts it too close to the A/C compressor. Also depending on what year maxima you have, you will need to weld in an EGR bung to the rear header, since the Hotshots do not have EGR.

Click the image to open in full size.

Headers put together
Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

Fresh from vipervadim’s paint shop
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Stats:

Header:
A. Runner Inlet (oval) 1 7/8W x 1 5/16H
B. Runner Diameter (outer) – 1 5/8in
C. Runner Length – Front (15, 15 1/2, 20) Rear (12 1/2, 14, 15 1/4) in
D. 3-1 Collector Diameter (inner) – 2in

Y-Pipe
E. Y-Pipe Diameter (outer) – 2 1/8 -> 2 1/2in.
F. Collector Diameter (inner) – 2 7/16
G. Equal Length (23 1/2in each) W/ NO EGR

The Hotshots like the Cattman headers have equal length runners (notice the round bend at the rear header), unlike the SSAuto and OBX.

Equal length pipes help the sound and they provide less backpressure.

Cattman

Price is somewhere around $850+ ShippedNewest ‘Gen2’ Version of the legendary Cattman Headers. Cattman switched to a 3-piece design like the Hotshots from their 4-piece ‘Gen1’ header design. Cattman is a full integrated system, the most expensive headers for the maxima, they are also made wit the most time and precision. there are no big bends in the Cattman piping, every piece is mandrel bent slightly then welded together to form a larger bend. Header runners and Y-pipe runners too.

Click the image to open in full size.

Cattman does it right: O2 bung in correct location, there are NO issue with the Cattmans. (you get what you pay for?)

Click the image to open in full size.Put together
Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.Fresh from vipervadim’s paint shop

Click the image to open in full size.
Stats:Header:
A. Runner Inlet (oval) 1 11/16W x 1 1/4H
B. Runner Diameter (outer) – 1 5/8in
C. Runner Length – Front (12 1/2, 13, 16) Rear (12, 12 1/2, 13) in
D. 3-1 Collector Diameter (inner) – 2in
Y-Pipe
E. Y-Pipe Diameter (outer) – 2 1/8 -> 2 1/2in.
F. Collector Diameter (inner) – 2 3/8
G. Equal Length (20in each) W/ EGR
 

Header Comparison:

Here are pictures of the various headers compared to one another. This is the Group shot after Painting.

Click the image to open in full size.

So here we go: Many people have been asking me about this:

Cattman + Hotshot, just how different are they?First the y-pipes, notice how similar they are the only real difference is in the shape of the bend, the hotshot has a gentler bend, but the cattman is more steeper.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

Now onto the headers, you can really see how longer the hotshot runners are compared to Cattman. the Cattman has great 3-1 collectors.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

Hotshot and OBX

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Cattman and OBX
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Cattman, Hotshot, and OBX the 3 top contenders.

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This concludes my headers comparison.

So which headers are the Best?

You Decide — depending on your price range/preference. Thank You to everybody who helped out.

 

my4dsc: 127

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Member Credit: Viper Vadim

This is not a guide by any means, just familiarizes you with what is involved. This is not a job for someone who doesn’t have intermediate/advanced wrenching skills – so you’ve been warned. It took me a week to disassemble my first 5spd back in 2005, now ~3 hours.

If you are not familiar with how a manual transmission works internally, or are not confident in your abilities or can’t deal with issues when issues arise – leave this job for someone who knows it well.

I did not show the disassembly of shift forks/pins/how to set the check ball system/reverse gear/proper way to re-shim new bearings and other complex parts of rebuild, so once again this is NOT a how-to guide in any form or shape – I’m just posting pics of my progress.

BEARINGS SEALS PART NUMBERS

All ordered from Nissan = NACHI/NSK/NTN high quality Japanese bearings.
I’ve seen cheap kits with unknown bearing brands (made in china) and would not recommend using them due to the questionable quality of bearings

  • Input shaft bearing 1 – 32203-03E13
  • Input shaft bearing 2 – 32203-03E00
  • Main shaft bearing 1 – 32273-79E00
  • Main shaft bearing 2 – 32223-79E62
  • Pass side diff bearing (open diff – 2X) – 38440-96E00
  • VLSD driver side diff bearing (EXPENSIVE) – 38440-79E01
  • Input shaft seal – 32113-03E00
  • Shifter yoke seal – 32858-03E00
  • pass side axle seal – 38342-81X01
  • VLSD driver axle seal – 38342-51E00
  • open diff driver axle seal – 38342-81X00

How do you know if you have open diff or VLSD (the dumb way – look at the transmission)?

If axle seal is small = open diff (left)
If axle seal is large = VLSD (right)

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Now that you know what transmission you have you can get the proper seals/bearings.. not gonna be cheap (VLSD bearings are ~$450)

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Starting disassembly

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Shift forks, main/input shafts and diff is out

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OLD bearings off

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OLD bearing leftovers

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Shift yoke out

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Cases cleaned

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Yoke with new seal and boot in

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New bearings pressed on

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Assembled and sealed (need to swap speed sensor)

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Old Transmission Out

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VLSD Transmission going in

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NEW axles, NEW throw out bearing

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and that’s all.. fun times y0!!

If anyone remembers MAXUS09. I broke a shift fork on my 5spd during the last pass at MIR (shifting into 4th). Drove back to hotel in 4th gear only, pulled my trans out in hotel parking lot to find what broke inside. I got a blown tranny brought by ghostmax/i2vicious for parts (BIG Thanks again MD guys, and to NWP Aaron for the mat and jack I borrowed!!!)

I took that blown tranny apart for the part I needed, fixed my trans with it, put it back into the max, and drove all the way back to NYC.

my4dsc: 40

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Member Credit: Viper Vadim

I’ve seen plenty of 6th gen brake swaps into 4th/5th gens but I’ve never seen them modified to clear 16in rims.

I have 16s, spring and stuts, I plow through potholes in NYC, I’m never going to drive low and SLOW and avoid all potholes like some others with huge rims and lowered cars.  With that being said, I needed bigger brakes to help me SLOW down better.

I already had 11″ 2000 Max rotors and 4 piston wilwood dynalite calipers.
good for 60-0mph stops, but doesn’t fare too well with repeated high speed braking (100mph+)

so back to the drawing board I went – The result is this thread

old brake setup: 2000 Maxima(thicker than 95-99) 11″ rotor with dynalite 4-piston wilwoods

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they clear 15s with no problem!
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OLD setup vs New (11″ rotor vs 12.6″ rotor)

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Here’s where the fun begins:

To put 6th gen brakes into a 4th gen you need to enlarge the caliper mounting holes on the spindles.

Stock is 12mm
Need to enlarge holes to 14mm

So I got spare spindles, drilled them out, replaced wheel bearings, and cut off the heat/splash shields to clear bigger rotor.

I mounted the 6gen rotor and caliper to spindle with a wheel spacer to hold it in and test the fitment on 16s.

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It didn’t fit so time to bring out the grinder!
I grinded off the following parts of the caliper:

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and then grinded some more and some more..

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and then test fit it
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and got it down to this
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once it cleared without issues I painted them
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old SS brake lines were all nasty and weathered so: New Goodridge SS brake lines
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I did not need to use wheel spacers – they fit under the rims

SO TIIIIIIIIIGHT!!! I love it!!!
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Braking is greatly improved. Had this setup since the end of summer and no rubbing, no issues just good brakes.

How do they compare to the Wilwood’s?
The wilwood’s did have a better initial bite (4 piston clamp vs 1 piston) but when you step on the 6thgens they just hold and hold like no tomorrow. Wilwood’s would hold until a certain point and then start slipping (rotors gets hot)

For a typical drive around there’s no difference in braking 50-0, but when you push the car hard repeatedly, or braking from high speeds – they perform very well.

 

my4dsc: 21

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Member Credit: Cheston

WARNING: These are JUST directions. I am NOT liable if you mess up your car. Use common sense when attempting this or ANY mod. Always use caution when it comes tools that use electricity. WEAR PROTECTIVE CLOTHING!

Tools needed: phillips & flat head screwdriver, 10mm socket, 12mm socket, 6″ extension, THIN needle nose plyers, pencil

1 Set the height of the steering column to the lowest it can go.

2 Remove the plastic bottom cover to the steering column, it’s the piece that’s above your knee. There are two screws near the bottom, and then pull out.

3 Remove the Metal shield covering the bottom of the steering column. Two 10 mm bolts here.

4 Remove the bolts holding the steering column up, two 12mm bolts. Use the extension if you have trouble reaching up in there. Drop the steering column down.

5 Unscrew 2 screws holding in the top of the dash, it’s the plastic cover underneath that overhang. Pop down the top half way. Using some firm BUT consistent pressure, pull back on it, removing the cover from the dash. There are four little clipies that are holding it in, so besure to find those clips. Unhook the cables that are attached to the cruise control and dimmer switches.

6 Remove the three screws holding in the dash cluster. Unhook the four clips in the back and then take out the whole cluster. Now, unclip the plastic over and the black casing.

7 Now take the dash cluster to a place where is WELL LIT, and comfortable. You’re about to do something delicate. Note the FUEL level.

8 To remove the needles, you fist need to take off the needle-rest stops. Those are the little black thingies that the need rests on when the car is off. To do this, you need to lift up the gauge pieces ever so slightly to get the tweezers in there to pop off the plastic rests. after you have take out all three, rejoice. and take a breather.

9 Now, starting with the speedo, gently push the needle COUNTER CLOCKWISE until you feel a little resistance. MARK THIS SPOT WITH A PENCIL. this is your recalibration POINT. you’ll need to return the needle to this EXACT spot when you put back on the needle or else your speed readings will be seriously fucked.

Mark down the recalibration point for the tach too.

Mark down the recalibration point for the temp too.

10 Now, starting with the speedo gauge. gently, turn the needle COUNTERCLOCK wise three times. The pressure should get lighter and lighter the more turns you do. After the third turn, turn and LIFT up the needle. YOU MUST GENTLY LIFT WHILE TURNING or else you’re toast.

Turn about 3-4 more times while lifting and the needle will pop off the small metal shaft. If you pull out the shaft, you’re what we call in Chinese: a Man-toh. A Dumpling. A Dense white piece of toast, lamer than day-old bagels.

After you get the speedo needle off, do the same with the tachometer, remembering to LIFT while turning. And then repeat for the fuel and temp

11 Now, that you have all the needles off, do what you want to the gauges. Either swap out new ones or paint the stock ones. You can do what i did, and get overlays to change the stock ones into some cool colors.

12 Once you’re done with that you’re doing, then place the gauge back on, and position the needles at the 4 oclock position.

Gently press down. When it’s pretty much in, gently turn the needle, while pressing down, until you turn it to the recalibration point that you previously noted. If you over shoot, that’s ok, just go around again CCW.

RECLIP in the needle-rest stops.

13 For the FUEL and TEMP needles. it’s going to be tricky. My suggestion is, plug in the cluster, and then turn on the car. Since you noted the fuel level when you first started the car, move the needle to that position. And after three minutes, the temp needle should be dead center, that’s the “normal” temp reading, so move the needle to the middle.

14 Reclip the black casing, Reclip the plastic shield. Reattach the wires to the back of the gauge cluster and screw in those three screws.

15 Re-attach the dash cover, remembering to replug the connections for the cruise control and dimmer.

16 Re-attach the steering column. Re-attach the steering column metal shield.

17 Reclip the dash bottom covers, remembering to screw those two screws in.

18 Turn on the car. Rev it up. Does the RPM needle move? Does the Fuel register? Go fill up and see where exactly “F” is. Is the temp right? Is the Speed right?

19 Good. You’re done.

my4dsc: 24

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Member Credit: d_warner

OK. I’ve had some people ask me about the painted dash in my 97 GXE. For those of you who really want to know, here’s a short and I mean short write up.

 

 

I first started by removing the pieces of the dash that I wished to paint. The front center A/C vents that are attached to the clock, Hazard light button, and rear defrost button was first. Many people will tell you to stick a small screw driver in between the trim piece and the main dash. I’ve found that an old butter knife works better. The wider surface area lessens the likelihood of creasing the plastic. Anyways, stick the knife in there and pry between the two pieces until the center trim piece begins to stick out a little. From there, grab it with your hands and pull firmly. If you hear a loud snap, don’t worry. I’ve yet to remove my center A/C vents without the A/C vent piece detaching from the console trim. When you get it out, you’ll see what I’m talking about. When the piece is loose, disconnect the wiring plugs from the clock, hazards, and defroster.

Once the A/C vents are out, move to the lower console trim piece around the gear shift selector or shift knob. If you have an auto (you poor unfortunate souls 🙂 you’ll probably have to do the knife trick again. If you have a 5 speed (congrats) then you can reach under the plastic trim piece near where the shift boot meets the trim. Gently pull up. The piece comes up from the rearmost portion first. It then just tucks up under the main center console trim. If you got a 5 speed, you’ll have to remove your shift knob. For those with factory knobs that have never been removed, this can be tricky. I’ve heard the strap tools from sears work best. It simply unscrews (you’ll just have to trust me. It’s on there good!) Once the knob is off, the boot will come up and off. Unplug the cigarette lighter. You’ll have to push the little release button thingy. The boot sits in the trim with basically clamps and the wire frame. Look at the back of the trim. You’ll see.

The ash tray is next. There is one Phillips head bolt on the left side of the ashtray. take it out. From there, the ashtray pulls straight out. Mine was a real pain, and I actually broke the clip off cause I thought initially it slide to the left. My mistake. IT COMES STRAIGHT OUT. Once that is out, It is time for the large piece where the radio, A/C controls, and that cool cubby hole is.

This is the easy one. There are 4 screws (Phillips head) that hold the large piece to the dash. Once those are out, the whole thing comes out. Unplug the electronics, and you’re good to take everything inside where its clean and air conditioned (I live in TX. This is important).

Once inside, its time to remove and dismantle some thing. Take the A/C vents apart from the trim. There are a series of clips that hold them together. Pretty self explanatory. There are buttons on each side of the hazard light and defrost buttons. Push them in and push the buttons out through the front of the trim. There are two screws on the back of the clock display. Take them off, and remove the clock. Now that piece is almost ready to be painted.

Next, look at the big piece. There are 4 screws on the back of the big trim piece that hold the metal bracket and the trim together. Take those off and separate the two pieces. Set the plastic trim aside. It’s almost ready to be painted. If you want to paint the cubby hole thing, then remove it from the bracket via the 4 screws. You may need to loosen the screws on the radio and A/C to get this out properly. If you take it out, set it aside.

I had manual A/C controls, and it would be extremely hard to paint this piece since it is all one piece, and some part of it are transparent to show the light. If you have Auto Climate control, I believe you can dismantle that piece (remove the buttons and LCD from the main trim) to paint it successfully.

Set the ash try aside.

Last off, set you shifter trim piece aside for those of you with autos. I think it should be ready, unless there is a clear piece in there somewhere. I’m not sure really. For the 5 speed guys, remove the shift boot if you haven’t already done so. It’s simply a wire frame on the back of the trim piece that is clipped in. Really easy.

Now lets prep. Take all your pieces. Should just be plastic pieces. I put mine in the kitchen sink and took some liquid AJAX and went to scrubbing. The purpose is to remove ALL the old armor all and other cleaners and stuff that has soaked into the plastic over the years. Mine unfortunately had a dash kit on it, and I had to remove about an eighth of an inch of adhesive. Took me about 4 hours to do just that. 🙁 Once everything is properly cleaned you have the choice of doing the following. I chose to wet sand all the pieces of my dash for a clean smooth look. I used a fine grit sandpaper (cant remember) to wet sand mine. This also helps to remove any armor all etc.

Set the pieces out to dry. Take a lint free cloth to speed this process. Now its time to paint. I used Duplicolor wheel paint (silver) to do my dash. The reason, the wheel paint is made to adhere specifically to plastics, and it is also engineered to resist chipping and scratches.

I chose to hang my pieces in my garage via electric fencing wire (commonly found in south Texas garages). That left me a clean place to paint without bugs, dust, wind, etc. Paint the trim pieces like you would anything else. Light smooth consistent strokes. Don’t go to slow or too often or you’ll get runs in the paint. If the paint runs, you’ll have to let it dry, and then go back and wet sand it, and then start all over again or else it’ll look like crap. Patience is the key here. This is a mod that will easily take a full day and maybe two. Put on several coats of good consistent paint in order to obtain a good clean STRONG finish. Some of you may wish to do a coat or two of clear coat. It’s up to you. Some people swear by it, but I didn’t do mine. If you do a clear coat, you will get a glossy finish. I didn’t want that, and due to the paint I used, I didn’t think durability would be an issue. After about 6 months now, I only have two very small scratches in the passenger door handle insert due to my wife’s long fingernails which could have been avoided.

Let the paint dry an accurate amount of time, and reinstall you sweet looking dash.

To get to the gauge cluster, start by removing the plastic panel underneath the steering wheel by the driver?s legs. Remove a Phillips head screw from each side of the bottom of the plastic trim. The top of the trim is held on by two retaining clips. Once those are popped out, you will need to disconnect a sensor attached to the back of the panel. Once removed, remove the two 10mm screws that hold the steel plate which is located directly behind the plastic panel.

Now remove the 6 Phillips head screws on the bottom of the column. Pull the top piece of trim off the column, and then remove the key hole trim. The bottom plastic trim grips the column, so it will take a good tug. Next remove the wiper stalk and headlight stalk by removing the two brass Phillips head screws from each. Let them dangle out of the way. Now remove the two Phillips head screws from the gauge trim. The bottom is held on by retaining clips. Once this piece is free, unplug the switches that are present. They may be the security LED, the gauge dim switch, and the cruise switch. Once this piece is removed, you can push the switches back out through the front of the trim. Paint the trim if desired.

Now remove the three screws holding the gauges to the car. One in the top center, and one in each lower corner. Unclip the harnesses from the back of the gauges. The gauge bezel and the clear lens are simply clipped into place. Take your time removing the two. Once you get the bezel off, you can paint it to match your dash as well. Take you time and don?t break anything. I went ahead and replaced the bulbs in my gauges while I was back there. LED bulbs work OK, but make sure they are wide angle bulbs if you do.

my4dsc: 14

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Member Credit: wariow3

Difficulty:

Easy to moderate.

Knowledge of LED’s + Resistors

Experience with soldering recommended

Items needed:

  • Small flat head screw driver
  • small phillips screwdriver
  • 5mm leds ,I used white LED’s( around 10, more just incase they blow or just dont’ work) I get mine off ebay from the user ctwick or something.
  • He ships them from hong kong and it’s free shipping. I paid 9 dollars for 25 blue and 25 white leds. Nice and bright and they come with free resistors too!
  • Soldering Iron (small tip preferred) 10-15 dollars from radio shack
  • Dremel or a drillbit tool to drill holes
  • Tweezers
  • Scissors
  • electrical tape
  • thin probably 20-22 gauge speaker wire ( split in half)
  • krazy glue

Dome Light

Start by removing the plastic cover off the dome light itself by prying off from the slit near the switch

Upon opening you’ll reveal two philips screws, simply remove those with your philips screwdriver.

After removing the screws, pull it out from the roof a lil and remove the connections and bring it inside so we can start cooking.

Here we have the dome light opened up. As you can see, I used my dremel and a drill bit and just drilled out an array of holes on the border of the plastic.

Start making your resisted LED’s by soldering the resistors and LEDs together.

Stick them in from the BACK side of the dome light so that the + and the – of the LED sides are facing a similar way

Use krazy glue on the edges of the LED to secure them in the holes.

Here’s the tricky and annoying part, using the split speaker wires, Measure the distance of the speaker wire from the led to the center and give it about an inch of clearance.

Connect all the Positive(+) sides of the leds to all one color and solder onto the LED leads.

Connect all the Negative(-) leads to the other color and solder on the leds.

After connecting each color on the LEDs, attach the ends of all the wires into a bunch. Attach another wire on the bunched ends of one color and drag it through a hole to the other side for power.

Use electrical tape to wrap one side of the LED leads so that they won’t make contact with each other.

MAKE SURE NONE OF THE OPPOSITE COLORS TOUCH wether it be the leads or the speaker wires or it will probably blow an led.

The red circled wire is positive and the black is negative. I connect all my Positives to the red speaker wire and all my negatives to a silver speaker wire.

Connect these with solder onto the existing connection.

Here’s a closeup of the connection soldered.

Now remove the existing bulb and bring out for testing.

Here’s the finished result. BLING BLING eh? if some don’t light up or none light up at all, check your existing connections and look at your LED’s to see if any have blown. and check the polarity of the LEDs or your wires.

my4dsc: 10

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