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Owner: Andre Nicholson

Year: 2005
Model: Altima
Current Color: Black
Transmission: 6-Speed Manual
Trim: SE-R

 

 

Mod List:

  • 2012 Gen2 VQ35DE Swap
  • Rev-up Oil Pump
  • ARP Rod Bolts
  • Stage 2 Clutch
  • OBX Headers
  • Full 3” Y-Pipe & Exhaust
  • RIPP Mods Supercharger Custom Kit
  • Vortech V2 Blower
  • 3″ Intercooler
  • ID1000cc Injectors
  • Tuned on UpRev
  • Tial BOV

Community Member Credit: Stephen Max

As far as the stock fuel system is concerned. The Maxima uses an airflow referenced system. The mass airflow sensor (MAFs, or MAF) sends a voltage signal to the ECU based on how much air is flowing through it into the engine. The ECU uses that information, along with engine rpm and O2 sensor voltage to determine how long injector pulses should be to achieve stoichiometric combustion. This is for cruising and light acceleration and is called closed-loop mode. Closed-loop refers to the feedback loop in which fuel metering by the injectors is adjusted based on whether the O2 sensors detect combustion that is either leaner or richer than stoichiometric.

If the throttle is opened beyond a certain amount, as sensed by the throttle position sensor, the ECU goes into a mode in which it ignores O2 sensor voltage altogether and uses only the MAF signal and engine rpm. This is the open-loop mode. Injector pulse widths are determined by a lookup table for each combination of MAF voltage and engine rpm. The values in the lookup table are based on engine testing and give about a 13:1 to 13.5:1 air-fuel ratio for the stock engine at wide-open throttle.

When you install the supercharger kit you are significantly increasing the air flowing into the engine. This is not a problem during cruising and light acceleration because the SC does not exceed the airflow beyond what the MAF is able to measure. At wide-open throttle, however, it is possible to exceed what the MAF can measure. Also, for the boosted operation, we want an air-fuel ratio that is lower than what is provided by the ECU as a deterrent to detonation. The method that the Stillen kit uses to provide sufficient fuel for the additional air is to provide extra fuel pressure based on manifold pressure. This is done with the fuel management unit (FMU), which boosts fuel pressure according to a ratio that is determined by the size of the disk inside it. It is possible to have a fuel pressure to boost pressure rate as low as 3:1 and as high as 12:1. The stock Stillen kit comes with a 6:1 disk in the FMU (it might actually be 8:1, I forgot which), meaning that the FMU raises fuel pressure 6 psi for every psi of positive manifold pressure. This is a fairly crude way to tune, but it is simple and effective. In most cases, it results in an overly rich AFR at mid-range rpm which leans out to an acceptable AFR at high rpm.

In order to supply the additional fuel, either the Vortech auxiliary inline pump should be used, or the stock in-tank pump should be replaced with the Walbro 255 LPH pump. The stock pump can not deliver enough fuel at a sufficiently high pressure to provide a rich enough AFR to prevent detonation.

Additional Info:

  • You need more fuel than what the OEM fuel pump can supply. You have two options. You can use the Vortech T-Rex auxiliary inline fuel pump (that comes with the Stillen kit) along with the OEM in-tank pump, or you can replace the in-tank pump with a Walbro 255 LPH pump. If you go with the Walbro pump you do not need the Vortech aux pump.
  • In either case, you still need the FMU to raise fuel pressure when you are boosting. The only thing that would change that is if you installed larger fuel injectors that could supply an adequate amount of fuel at OEM fuel pressure.
  • The stock fuel pump has its strainer parallel to the bottom of the gas tank and is able to suck up pretty much all the gas in the tank. The strainer that comes with the Walbro points upward at about a 30-degree angle and is not capable of sucking as much gas up (when it gets below approximately 1/8th of a tank) as the stock strainer. To fix the problem, take the stock fuel pump strainer and put it on the Walbro fuel pump. This has been tested and proven to work during the course of installing Mike’s (VIP Maxima) supercharger. With this mod, you can now drive your car like normal and not worry about running out of gas/poor performance at 1/8th of a tank.

Owner: Terrance Herrera

Year: 2006
Model: Altima
Current Color: Smoke
Transmission: 6-Speed Manual
Trim: SE-R

Dyno Results

  • 376 WHP / 425 TQ @ 4.8 PSI  on E85 Octane
  • 601 WHP / 603 TQ @ 13.2 PSI on E85 Octane
  • Tuned By Richard Williams aka “Dry”

Mod List:

  • 2010 Gen2 VQ35DE
  • Holley Hi-Ram Upper Intake Manifold (Using Caleb Adapter)
  • ID 1000cc Injectors
  • Haltech ECU
  • Quantum Fuel Pump (E85 Compatible)
  • Custom Fuel Rails & Fuel Return System with External Fuel Pressure Regulator
  • Audi/Volkswagen Coilpack conversion.
  • OBX Headers mated to Custom Turbo Up-Pipe.
  • Custom Intercooler Piping
  • Universal Oil Cooler Kit
  • Custom 3″ Single Exit Exhaust System
  • Red Lion Racing Engine Mounts
  • Boost Junkies Gtx3582r, 44mm Wastegate, Blow off Valve & Vacuum Manifold
  • OEM HLSD Upgrade
  • Fidanza Single Mass Flywheel
  • Spec Stage 3 Clutch Kit
  • Unorthodox Racing Crank Pulley
  • BC Coilovers
  • Racing Line rear swap and end links
  • Wilwoods front & Akebono rear
  • SPC Rear Toe Arms
  • Racing Line Traction Arms
  • Greddy Profec B Boost Controller
  • Tuned By Richard Williams aka “Dry”

Owner: Terrance Herrera

Year: 2006
Model: Altima
Current Color: Smoke
Transmission: 6-Speed Manual
Trim: SE-R

Dyno Results

  • 356 WHP / 312 TQ @ 5 PSI  on 93 Octane
  • 466 WHP / 411 TQ @ 9.7 PSI on 93 Octane
  • Tuned By Richard Williams aka “Dry”

Mod List:

  • Gen2 VQ35DE
  • Holley Hi-Ram Upper Intake Manifold (Using Caleb Adapter)
  • ID 1000cc Injectors
  • Haltech ECU
  • Quantum Fuel Pump (E85 Compatible)
  • Custom Fuel Rails & Fuel Return System with External Fuel Pressure Regulator
  • Audi/Volkswagen Coilpack conversion.
  • OBX Headers mated to Custom Turbo Up-Pipe.
  • Custom Intercooler Piping
  • Universal Oil Cooler Kit
  • Custom 3″ Single Exit Exhaust System
  • Red Lion Racing Engine Mounts
  • Boost Junkies Gtx3582r, 44mm Wastegate, Blow off Valve & Vacuum Manifold
  • OEM HLSD Upgrade
  • Fidanza Single Mass Flywheel
  • Spec Stage 3 Clutch Kit
  • Unorthodox Racing Crank Pulley
  • BC Coilovers
  • Racing Line rear swap and end links
  • Wilwoods front & Akebono rear
  • SPC Rear Toe Arms
  • Racing Line Traction Arms
  • Greddy Profec B Boost Controller
  • Tuned By Richard Williams aka “Dry”

Owner: Terrance Herrera

Year: 2006
Model: Altima
Current Color: Smoke
Transmission: 6-Speed Manual
Trim: SE-R

Mod List:

  • 1st Gen VQ35DE
  • Kinetix Intake Manifold
  • NWP 75mm Throttle Kit
  • NWP Intake Manifold thermal Spacers
  • OEM GTR Injectors
  • Quantum Fuel Pump (E85 Compatible)
  • Custom Fuel Rails & Fuel Return System with External Fuel Pressure Regulator
  • Audi/Volkswagen Coilpack conversion.
  • OBX Headers mated to Custom Turbo Up-Pipe.
  • Custom Intercooler Piping
  • Universal Oil Cooler Kit
  • Custom 3″ Single Exit Exhaust System
  • Red Lion Racing Engine Mounts
  • Boost Junkies Gtx3582r, 44mm Wastegate, Blow off Valve & Vacuum Manifold
  • Oem HLSD Upgrade
  • Fidanza Single Mass Flywheel
  • Spec Stage 3 Clutch Kit
  • Unorthodox Racing Crank Pulley
  • 350z Brembo Front & Rear Brakes
  • Megan Racing 3-Way Adjustable Coilovers
  • SPC Rear Toe Arms
  • Racing Line Traction Arms
  • Greddy Profec B Boost Controller
  • Tuned By Richard Williams aka “Dry” On UpRev

Owner: Ronny Parra

Year: 1999
Model: Maxima
Color: Black
Transmission: Built Automatic
Trim: SE

Previous VQ30DE Setup

New Gen2 VQ35DE Setup

 

Mod List:

  • Gen2 VQ35DE
  • Vortech V2 Supercharger
  • LSD Automatic Transmission Shift Kit
  • Upgraded Torque Converter
  • Audi R8 Coilpacks

Community Member Credit: LatinMax

Why Needed? If you want to gain at least 1 more lb of boost.

Parts/Price:

  • K&N Filter  3.5″ Diameter Opening (#RU-1785) $52.00
  • Rubber 90 Degree 3″ Pipe $5.00
  • 3″ PVC 6-8 Feet
  • 3″ ProFlex Coupling (Brand FERNCO)
  • 3″ Silicone Hose

Remove the low-pressure SC pipe and cover the SC with some duck tape. (to keep shavings out of the SC) Also jack up the car and remove the passenger tire. Remove the wheel well cover and pull out the washer bottle. But first, pull out the fill neck. Just grab it and pull, it pops out (this has 2 10mm bolts that you will need to remove)

Take out the MAF and cut the 4 wires that go to the MAF. Make sure to cut all 4 wires staggered. (cut each wire 1″ than longer the next). Now cut 4 16-18 gauge wires that are 3 1/2-4 ft long. 3M Crimps connecters is what I used. Now when you get to the other end you will know that you are connecting the right wires. The stager from the MAF should match the stager of the new wire, plus your wire won’t be too thick to hide in the split loom. (do not plug in the MAF just yet)

You will have to modify your MAF some. Remove the 4 bolt (10mm wrench) and then you will need to grind the flange off. Make sure that you don’t grind out the screen. Cut the 3″ silicone hoses to fit over both ends of the MAF.

Before

After

Use the MAF to get an idea of how much bigger you will have to make the hole for the piping to go thru. You will also need to cut the bracket in the fender well for clearance. (clean out all the shavings i.e.: vacuum or blow it out)

Cut the PVC pipe to about 5 1/2″ (you may want to measure for your own fit. I had a custom front bumper that is deeper. So my PVC was closer to 9″) (a miter saw works well to cut PVC).

Assemble the PVC to the rubber elbow and then to the K&N filter (this way you can slide the PVC pipe up and down inside the filter to get it just right) (If you go too far into the filter take it out and cut again)

Trim the 3″ ProFlex coupling. Turn it inside out and trim it with a sharp (new) razor blade (I use a grinder or Dremel to grind off the lip in the middle).

Before

After

Remove the tape off of the SC and place 3″ ProFlex coupling on the SC and tighten it on there. Next, push the filter assembly thru the wheel well. Then route it so that you can place the washer bottle back in later.

Line it up with a 3″ ProFlex coupling that is attached to the SC. Mine did not go on really square (it seals just fine).

Tighten all the clamps up and place the washer bottle back in. You will only be able to get to the back bolt to the washer bottle and the filter will hold the rest in. Put your fill neck back in. Plug the MAF back in.

Start your car and feel for any leaks around your CAI.

Put the wheel well cover back on and your tire.

Test drive and see if you can feel the difference. Re-check your connections once again.

Happy Modding!