Category

my4thgen 95-99

Category

Member Credit: Greg

I might be going out on a limb classifying the changing of your manual transmission fluid as a “performance” modification, but considering how use of this stuff will improve your shifts in both cold and hot weather, the classification might not be that far off. I used Red Line D4 ATF in my 1999 Maxima, and the automatic shifts were much more crisp and smooth, so I decided to give the manual transmission equivalent a try. Nissan recommends gear oil of API grade GL-4 and a viscocity of 75W-90 or 75W-85. Red Line MT-90 meets these specifications.

Transaxle oil capacity for the 6-speed is significantly less (roughly half) that of the prior Maxima’s (1995-2001) 5-speed. You will only need 3 quarts of MT-90, and you will not even be able to use all of the 3rd quart.

Not many tools are needed. A 3/8-inch drive ratchet with a 10mm hex bit is all that is required to remove both the drain and fill plugs, which are identical on the 2002 6-speed transmission.

You also need either a funnel with a long (~3.5 feet) flexible hose, or you can string together anything that will give you the appropriate length. I used a large funnel with a hose extension that allowed me to turn the flow on or off (important if the tip slips out of the fill hole!!).

When replacing the drain and fill plugs, it is a good idea (although not totally necessary) to replace the gaskets. These gaskets do not “crush” like the crankcase oil plug gaskets do, so they can be re-used. Price for each from Nissan was $2.21. You’ll need two. A bit steep…

Here is a blowup from the shop manual. Some of you might notice that this transmission looks quite differently than the 5-speed in earlier 4th and 5th-generation Maximas.


This photo (and the one below) should look like the drawing (above). Photo at left was taken from near the left-front wheel, shooting towards the passenger side of the car. The tranny fluid drain hole is visible in the lower right corner of the picture.

Here is the fill hole. Contrary to what some have done, it is not necessary to jack the car up or put it on ramps to do this job. In fact, I do not recommend raising the car, as all of the fluid will not drain out. I put an old rug on the garage floor and did everything lying on my back – it was not difficult at all – you just need good lighting.

Transax-FillHole.jpg (720×480)

Here is another image from the shop manual, with highlights. After draining/refilling the transmission fluid, you should replace both crush gaskets before putting the plugs back in.

Here is the drain (or fill) plug removed.

It only takes 10-15 minutes for all of the fluid to drain out. The 2002 6-speed transmission will give up roughly 2.5 quarts of very brown-looking fluid.

Here is my funnel system, all rigged up. This is actually the most time-consuming part of the whole process. Making sure your setup is good enough so that it will not leak, fall out of the fill hole, or drop down to the floor. I recommend roughly 3-3.5 feet of hose. You fill the tranny until oil pours back out the fill hole. It should take roughly 2.5 quarts. Note, this is half the capacity of prior Maxima manual transmissions.
After performing this simple change, I noticed that all shifts (especially 2nd-3rd, for some reason) seemed much smoother, and engagement was crisp and positive. An extremely worthwhile investment.

my4dsc: 35

Member Credit: QNO_A32

I installed the Warpspeed Y-Pipe today in my driveway. It is a nice piece and im happy with it. It came with all hardware that you need, and even comes with a nice hanger as well. Took me about 1 hour using hand tools.

Things you will need:
Floor jack
Jackstands
1/2″ ratchet
14mm deep impact socket
14mm shallow impact socket
12mm impact socket
22mm wrench
Penetrating oil
1/2″ swivel
1/2″ impact extention

Here is the hanger that came with the y pipe it uses factory mounting points and works very well. It also came with two new cat to y pipe bolts and nuts and gasket.

Here is where the rear downpipe meets the manifold. take out the O2 sensor to give a little more room. The swivel must be used back here at least on two of these nuts. I used the short socket for one and the long one for the other.

There’s no need to show the front it looks just like the rear but is easier to do. same thing…remove 02 sensor and loosen the 3 nuts. Once you take both O2 sensors out and the 6 nuts for the headers you just have to undo the cat to y pipe bolts. My exhaust is new so this wasn’t a problem for me but others might have trouble with rust. After everything is unbolted there are still two 12mm bolts holding the y pipe up…remove these and drop the pipe out.

Putting the aftermarket pipe is much easier you have more room to work with. install the crush gaskets and get the down-pipes on the studs and hand tighten all 6 nuts. put the new gasket for the cat and hand tightened the two bolts. than install the new hanger and tighten it down. Tighten down the 6 nuts but don’t crank them down or they will snap. than tighten the y pipe to the cat and you done. start it up and check for leaks.

I’m OK with the way mine sounds i have a 2.5″ test pipe and a 2.5″ crush bent cat back to a 5.5 gen muffler. The added power is nice too. thanks for reading and I’m sure i forgot something but i hope some people will chime in. THANKS

my4dsc: 26

Member Credit: SrgScott

Hey guys, I had an oil leak in my upper oil pan, so decided to give you a write-up on how to remove it! I’m going to assume everyone knows how to apply liquid gasket and seals, so I will be leaving that part out. So, if you ever have to remove your upper oil pan, whether its for a simple leak, or your replacing your rear main seal (the “correct” way) then I hope this helps!

I should also warn you. The first time I did this it took me just over 7 hours. But, this being my third time, it took me 5 hours. So be ready to spend the day under your car. I know it will take each person different amounts of time depending on experience. But this just gives you an idea.

Also, I suggest you clean up your engine and engine bay really well while you are in there. I used berrymans B12 carb and throttle body cleaner. The stuff is insane. But be careful to dry it off painted surfaces, just in case

Tools needed:
1/4″ Ratchet
Extension
Breaker Bar
Universal Joint (Swivel Head)
10mm Socket
12mm Socket (Shallow & Deep)
14mm Socket (Shallow & Deep)
17mm Socket
13mm Wrench
17mm Wrench
Gasket Scraper
Flat Head Screwdriver
Rubber Mallet (May not be needed, I did need one)

Now on to the process!

Step 1: Remove the ground cable from your battery, safety first!

Step 2: Drain Engine oil (Mine was a 13mm Plug, however, yours may be 14mm or another, just try wrenches till you find the right one for you), and remove oil filter.

Step 3: Remove both CKPS sensors, three(3) 10mm bolts total, and the Oil pressure sensor(along with the little bracket that holds the wires, three(3), 12mm bolts)

Step 4: Remove the ten(10), 10mm bolts that hold up the steel oil pan. Picture only shows five, but you get the idea.

Step 5: Remove the oil strainer, two(2), 12mm bolts

Step 6: Remove the Y-Pipe, eight(8), 12mm nuts(Aparently on some other Maxs or I30s the 6 nuts at the manifold may be 14mm, again, just try them till you get your correct size). You will need your extension, universal joint, and both shallow and deep 12mm sockets here. Also, you may need some liquid wrench for the nuts, as they may be rusted on, be gentle yet firm and TAKE YOUR TIME, you don’t want to break a stud off. (Sorry, I don’t have a photo for this step, but if you need one let me know and I will get one for you!)

Step 7: Place a SUITABLEfloor jack on a SAFE location on the trans to support it for the next step. In the photo is where I placed my floor jack. You could also use an engine hoist if you want.

Step 8: Remove the eight(8) center beam bolts

Step 9: Remove your drive belt. 14mm deep socket and an extension is what I use.

Step 10: Remove the A/C Compressor, and its brackets. Six(6), 14mm bolts, and two(2) 12mm bolts.

After removing the compressor, I place it on an extra jack stand so it is not just hanging there adding stress to the lines.

Step 11: Remove the cover plate, its black and literally covers a hole that lets you inspect the timing ring. Two(2), 10mm bolts. Sorry it’s not in the photo, but you get the idea.

Step 12: Remove the Upper oil pan. Twelve(12), 12mm bolts(Five are inside where the oil strainer was, see photo), and then remove the four(4), 14mm tranny bolts(see photo). I’m sorry I dont have a photo of all twelve bolts the hold it up there, its just a little difficult to get a D80 under there. If you need me to get some photos of the bolts for you let me know and I’ll do my best.

The upper pan won’t come out too easily. Just be patient with it, there are a few spot that have a slight indention where you can place a flat head screw driver(or the recommended tool the dealer uses) to pry it off. Just take your time and it will be off soon.

And here is the upper oil pan off of your car, congrats! I’m so proud of you…..

See the two little o-rings there? If they are still in good condition (as mine were) just clean them up and use them again, otherwise, replace them (dealer part?). Look at the bottom of your engine, you should see where they go, I just put a tiny bit of liquid gasket on them to hold them in place while I installed the upper oil pan. Be sure to scrape all of the old gasket out of those little crevasses, so that your new liquid gasket will work as intended!

And here is the view from the bottom of your engine, not the best photo, but you get the point.

my4dsc: 17

Member Credit: marktab

Hi All — thanks for the other posts on maxima.org on EGR tube cleaning. I spent several hours cleaning mine, and decided to take comprehensive pictures. Enjoy!

Why are you posting so many pictures and information since this topic is often on maxima.org?

The EGR Tube cleaning took me hours to finish. Also, this cleaning job does not appear in my generic Nissan service manual, nor is it in the official Nissan service manual. People who repair cars a lot or who are advanced will NOT need this much detail (and there are many advanced or professional-level people on this forum). I consider this project as an intermediate-level service task, and the directions can help you or help someone you might pay to do it for you.

Do you recommend removing from the top or the bottom?

Some have had success removing the tube from the bottom (under the car). However, I believe a better solution is to remove the IACV assembly so that you can clean it. Also, the hole where the IACV assembly goes provides a way to scrape and clean the area where the EGR Tube empties into the main air flow chamber. I did NOT remove the intake manifold.

Do I need to purchase replacement gaskets?

I did not, and I made sure that I was not soaking my original gaskets with the cleaning solvent. If you do destroy yours, you could probably cut your own new ones from gasket material designed for exhaust pipes.

Did you replace your EGR flow tube?

Someone mentioned that they bought a replacement tube. I think it’s sufficient to clean the tube you have unless you have some reason to get a new one (say if it rusted or cracked). Even if you buy a replacement tube, you will still need to clean the sensor off, and also the ports where the EGR tube connects to the car. I found more carbon at the top end, and I believe there was more there because of the sharp airflow angle. The IACV assembly also can be cleaned, and the IACV assembly port allows for cleaning the main airflow chamber.

How quickly can the job be completed?

We can compare how long it takes to remove the EGR tube from the vehicle. Some say they can remove it in minutes, and I believe experienced people can do it that quickly. However, the entire time is affected by how much cleaning the tube needs, and how much time you need to clean the connection port areas and the IACV assembly. In cleaning blockage, you need to at least scrape enough out to allow airflow again, and at best, you can clean these areas back to the original bare metal surface. If someone claims to do this whole job quickly, I would wonder how much time and care they put into the cleaning. Poor cleaning will shorten the time until the next required cleaning.

How often should the EGR flow tube be cleaned?

My tube was cleaned for the first time at 111K miles. It was already blocked and throwing the P0400 (same as P400) code (which is one code which will turn on the yellow engine light on the dashboard). I believe the answer varies on your oil choice, driving habits, and typical use (meaning city or highway driving). I believe that 100K is too long to wait. Now that my bottom connection nut has been hacked, cleaning it in the future will take less time.

Did the problem prevent passing emissions?

I have passed Georgia emissions every year since I got the car in 2000 (with 22K miles). This year (in January 2009), I had to replace the faulty gas cap. I do not know if this issue has been preventing people from passing emissions.

Do you recommend blowing the EGR carbon through the engine with seafoam or other solvents?

I believe that solution is NOT a good idea for this application. It is better to carefully scrape and remove the carbon deposits with fuel-injector safe carburetor cleaner. You can also spray this cleaner into the port where the IACV assembly goes. I would NOT expose my Maxima to excess oxygen or fuel, and expect it to run well, so I would NOT expect that putting extra carbon into the engine is a good idea. The carbon left by the EGR is not just black deposits on the metal wall, but thick tough carbon that I needed to carefully scrape out (mostly with a small screwdriver head).

What is the difference between cleaning the EGR flow tube and leaving it alone?

In my case, I simultaneously received the P0325 and P0400 codes together. The P0325 (or P325) code means change the knock sensor, and I was able to do that with directions from the maxima.org forum (and a replacement part from Ebay at about US$28, bought mine from the Ebay seller “abcmarts”). Changing the knock sensor alone improved my acceleration, and also improved engine starting (the engine used to require more cranking). Changing the EGR Tube has just about removed all pinging, and also improved acceleration (more). I track MPG, and have NOT seen a difference. Also, if you do NOT clean the tube, your engine will probably run (if that is your goal), but cleaning it helps restore toward the original engine performance (and probably extend engine life, even though no one could probably prove that point in all cases).

Do you believe blocking the EGR system is a good idea for Maxima fourth generation?

I do not, because of all the systems which connect into the EGR valve. You can study these connections in the official Nissan service manual (check eBay if you want to buy one). If you happen to be an automotive engineer and could prove to me comparable or superior performance using some workaround, I would like to hear about it.

Do you believe the EGR tube could be redesigned?

I believe the tube could be redesigned to allow for smoother air flow. As it is, the sensor comes into the tube at a right angle to the airflow (the sensor looks like a thermistor, a device to measure heat, and therefore a proxy for air flow). My EGR tube was most blocked at the top connection side, where the tube bends at about 90 degrees, and then goes into the main airflow chamber (and that part has a sharp bend too). None of us needs advanced automotive training to know that these sharp corners do not help airflow, and certainly not airflow filled with carbon particles. I believe a better air flow tube (and wider diameter) would be better. I have a theory that a better-designed tube would need to be cleaned less. The spacing, however, is tight, but maybe someone with good welding skills might want to fabricate and test a replacement.

So, has the light stayed off?

Yes, the light has stayed off for the last 500 miles. My story started with two engine codes, and in my case, I replaced the knock sensor first. The P0400 (same as P400) came back after less than 30 miles, and after a few weeks, I had a weekend where I decided to take on the EGR tube cleaning project.

Hopefully, this information will help you tackle the job 

my4dsc: 45

Owner: Miguel Arroyo

Social Media:

Year: 1999
Model: Maxima
Color: Custom Candy/Pearl Tangerine Orange
Transmission: Manual 5spd
Trim: SE-L also known as 99.5 or 4.5 Gen

What motivated you to MOD your Maxima?

I’ve been a Nissan guy all my life and I love the body style specifically on this model, it’s also considered as 4DSC and I know the potential and capability of these engines, so basically that’s why I decided to mod my car.

I’ve owned this car since 2010 and I’ve been building it for the last 6 years, every single mod has been done by me. – Miguel

Full Mod List / Specs:

    • Vortech V2 Supercharger with 2.62″ pulley
    • 00VI swap with Power Rod Set to Open at 4900RPM
    • Pathfinder Throttle Body (PFTB) with Block Off Plate (BOP)
    • 928MotorSports Mega Boost Limiter Valve (BLV)
    • Greddy Blow Off Valve (BOV)
    • Greddy eManage Ultimate (EMU) with Plug and Play (PNP) harness
    • Greddy Oil Catch Can
    • Greddy 5″X13″X3″ 3″Front Mount Intercooler (FMIC)
    • Greddy Radiator Cap
    • 2015 GT-R 560cc injectors
    • 255lph Walbro Fuel Pump
    • Aeromotive Air Fuel Pressure Regulator (AFPR)
    • Vortech Fuel Management Unit (FMU)
    • NGK Iridium 1 Step Colder Spark Plugs
    • Z32 TT MAF
    • Z32 Fuel Filter
    • SPEC Stage 3 Clutch
    • SPEC Lightweight Aluminum Flywheel
    • Unorthodox Stock Size Crank Pulley
    • OBX V2 headers-Y pipe Ceramic Coated and Fiberglass Heat Wrapped
    • 3″ 240sx Nismo High Flow Cat
    • 3″ Mandrel Bent Catback
    • 3″ MagnaFlow Resonator
    • 3″ Greddy Revolution RS Muffler
    • K-Sport Pro Coilovers
    • Stillen Oil Cooler Kit
    • Stillen AP Racing Big Brake Kit (BBK) with 330mm Stillen 2 Piece Rotors and SS Brake Lines
    • Stillen Rear Sway Bar (RSB)
    • Stillen Front Strut Tower Bar (FSTB)
    • Stillen Pop Charger
    • Injen Cold Air Intake (CAI)
    • AEM UEGO Wideband Gauge/Sensor
    • Autometer Shift Light
    • Quad Custom Pillar Gauge Pod
    • Steering Wheel Custom Gauge Pod
    • Glow Shift Gauges, Boost, Oil Pressure, Volt Meter, Double Intake Temperature and Nitrous
    • Rockford Fosgate Sound System T2’s 12″Subs 2 1000 Watts Amps/Speakers/Tweeters
    • Flipdown Tv’s
    • Pionner Double Din Radio
    • Fiber Glass Mounting Custom Kick Panel Speakers and Seat Belt Pillar Tweeters (Momo)
    • Optima Yellow Top Battery with Digital Silver Terminals
    • XXR 351 Wheels 18″x10″ Rear 18″x9″ Front 20 offset Custom Candy Electric Blue
    • Nitto 225-40R18″  Rear 215-40R18″ Front
    • 01 Maxima rear folding back seat conversion
    • Infiniti G37 Rear View Mirror Swap
    • Black Interior Swap
    • Stillen Front Lip
    • Sarona Side Skirts
    • Sarona Vented Fenders
    • Ionic Dynamics Rear Corners
    • Ionic Dynamics Rear Roof Spoiler
    • Ionic Dynamics
    • Carbon Fiber Eye Lids
    • Carbon fiber Interior Trim
    • R34 Headlights painted candy blue to match the wheels, Retrofited them with Bi-Xenon orimoto H1 7.0 projectors and Gatlin Gun Shrouds as DRL instead of high beams, J30 Infinity lowbeam projectors with clear lenses/spacers, Morimoto RGB Halos/demon eyes Switchback DRL ED Bars, Morimoto Elite HID’s, customized corner LED boards, Strobe Lights
    • Fog Lights Projectors Retrofit/RGB Halos/Strobe Lights
    • Taillights/bumper lights LED Retrofited/Sequential turn signal lights
    • Morimoto XBT RGB LED Cellphone Controller/Underglow LEDS/Wheel Well/Interiors/Dash Board-Heater Controllers-Window Switches/Map/Cluster
    • C-Mod Grill
    • Hella Electric Horns
    • Short Carbon Fiber/Aluminum Antenna Mast Conversion
    • Aerocatch Flush Hood Pins
    • Aluminum Rear Diffuser
    • Custom Front Splitter
    • Thule Roof Rack
    • RECARO Racing Seats
    • Four Point SPARCO Seat Belts
    • Custom Made Seat Brackets out of stock electric seats
    • Center Line Competition Series Qualifier Polished Wheels 15”x8” 14 lbs weight, Mickey Thompson Pro Bracket Radial Tires 20.0/8.5R15 X5 Compound
    • NX Stage 2 Water Methanol Injection kit
    • NOS Direct Port 120 Wet Shot Nitrous Kit
    • ZEX Machine gun Purge
    • 24lbs Nos Bottle with electric Nos opener
    • Dyno Tune Lean Shutdown Switch
    • Dyno Tune Bottle Heater
    • Custom Steering Wheel Wireless Nos Triggers along with Horns Fully Functional
    • Center Cupholder Custom Nos System Controllers
    • Nardy 350mm Sterring Wheel
    • NRG Quick Release
    • NRG Steering Wheel adapter
    • NRG Harness Bar
    • NRG Gold Wire Ground Kit
    • MOMO E-Brake Handle
    • NISMO Aluminum Pedals
    • NISMO Oil Filler Cap
    • Redlion Steering Column 1 Piece Aluminum Bushing
    • Energy Suspension (ES) Motor Mounts
    • Blue Interior Carpet
    • EGR Delete, No CEL
    • Flip Flop Trunk Lid Conversion
    • I also have a Carbon Fiber Hood, Trunk Lid, Spoiler and Lip Kit, but I haven’t installed them yet. I’m also planning to do a Custom Roll Cage and Painting it same color as my Wheels (Candy Electric Blue)

my4dsc: 643

If you are DIY person and love working on your Nissan Maxima, then this tool is a MUST HAVE! When you go to the Nissan dealer, the person working on your car typically uses a tool called a Nissan Consult. The Nissan Consult that the dealer uses costs thousand of dollars and is only available to dealers. By using the Nissan DataScan software, a laptop and a generic VAG COM OBDII adapter you can achieve just about the same level of on-board diagnosis that $5,000 Nissan Consult provides. This software allows you to:

  • Check CEL codes
  • Check/Reset ABS and SRS-Airbag Faults
  • Check/Reset TCM Codes
  • Adjust timing
  • Perform Idle Air Relearn
  • Reset ECU learned settings
  • Data-log
  • Program keys
  • Check Emissions Readiness Monitors
  • Active Test temporary modify some of the engine parameters for testing purposes
  • And Much much more….

The software itself costs $55.00 and generic cable costs around $7.00-$8.00. 

Software License Purchase Link: Nissan DataScan II

Software Download Links:

OBD2 Cable eBay Link: KKL 409 VAG COM OBD2 Cable

You can find the cables on eBay between $6.00-$8.00 shipped. Search for the following keywords on eBay and you will find it: “KKL 409.1 VAG-COM OBD2 USB Cable

Below are all the functions it provides:

ECU Part Number

This is the main window of the NDSII software which shows the ECM Nissan Identification part number. Basic and Advance Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons, using the shortcut keys (F1 – F11) or using the Menu bar. Most functions except Data Replay and Log Analyser are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates communication between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Data Display Settings

This window is used to assign parameters to be displayed by the Data Display function. Only parameters that are supported by the currently connected ECU are available for selection. Gauges are counted from left to right, top to bottom. Multiple gauges can monitor the same parameter.

Data Logging ECM

Selected parameters can be logged to a file. This function can also be accessed from the Data Display window. The data log file can be analysed using the Data Replay or Log Analyser functions.

Self Diagnostics ECM

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset engine ECU error codes.

Idle Adjustment

Idle Adjustment function allows users to adjust the base idle RPM. The setting is saved to the ECU and it does not reset with engine restart.

Timing Adjustment

Timing Adjustment function allows users to adjust the base ignition timing. The setting is saved to the ECU and it does not reset with engine restart.

Active Test ECM

Active Test allows users to temporary modify some of the engine parameters for testing purposes. They return to their original values when a function is stopped, PC disconnected or engine restarted.

Note: It is possible to damage the engine if the A/F Base % functions is used to excessively modify fuel delivery. Likewise the engine may overheat if the Engine Temperature is set to low for a long period of time. Do not use those functions if you are not sure how they will effect your engine.

Work Support

Work Support functions allow users to perform some of the advance service procedures. Those procedures may need to be performed after replacement parts are installed.

Clear Self Learn – clears the A/F Base SL map learned by the ECU.

Idle Air Volume Learn – is an operation to learn the fully closed position of the throttle valve.

Program Immobiliser Key – allows to register the Nissan transponder keys with the Immobiliser Note: The immobiliser security PIN CODE needs to be known. Initially all registered keys will be erased and all keys will need to be reregistered.

Cylinder Power Test

Cylinder Power Test function can be used to identify cylinder that is under performing. This function allows shutting down individual cylinders. If all of the cylinders are producing the same amount of power the engine RPMs will drop exactly the same amount on each cylinder that is cancelled.

Log Analyser is used to review log files previously generated by with Data Logging function. Graphs are drawn by selecting boxes next to parameter value. Graph colours match the parameter value colours.

Speed Test

Speed Test is a unique function for measuring car’s acceleration performance. Predefined or user specific tests can be used. Due to the low resolution of Nissan speed sensors, measurements should only be used as a guide and not a true reflection of car’s performance.

Note: This function should not be used while driving on public roads.

Address Watch

Address Watch function is used for monitor specific ECU memory addresses. By monitoring a memory address extra information can be retrieved that is not normally available using Consult II protocol. A knock sensor reading can be obtain using this method if knock sensor memory address is known.

Wideband O2 sensor

Nissan DataScan II also supports wideband Air/Fuel ratio meters from Innovate Motorsports. A second serial port is used to connect to the controller and collect data.

The data from the wideband meter can be displayed or logged in conjunction with other engine parameters using the Data Logging function.

ECU Part Number BCM

The BCM tab shows the BCM Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. All functions are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Self Diagnostics BCM

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset BCM error codes.

Active Test BCM

Active Test allows users to temporally activate some of the functions of the BCM. This is usually used to manually test the functionality of the systems controlled by the BCM.

Note: Functions not supported by the BCM are disabled (grayed out).

ECU Part Number TCM

The TCM tab shows the TCM Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. Most functions except Data Replay and Log Analyser are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Data Logging TCM

Selected parameters can be logged to a file. This function can also be accessed from the Data Display window so the data can be logged while it is displayed. The data log file can be analysed using the Data Replay or Data Analyser functions.

Self Diagnostics TCM

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset TCM error codes.

ECU Part Number ABS

The ABS tab shows the ABS Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. Most functions except Data Replay and Log Analyser are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Data Logging ABS

Selected parameters can be logged to a file. This function can also be accessed from the Data Display window so the data can be logged while it is displayed. The data log file can be analysed using the Data Replay or Data Analyser functions.

Self Diagnostics ABS

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset ABS error codes.

Work Support ABS

Work Support functions allow users to perform advance service procedures. Those procedures may need to be performed after replacing parts.

Steering Angle Sensor Reset – After removing/installing or replacing VDC/TCS/ABS control unit, steering angle sensor, steering components, suspension components, and tires, or after adjusting wheel alignment, make sure to adjust neutral position of steering angle sensor before running vehicle.

ECU Part Number SRS

The SRS tab shows the SRS Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. All functions are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Self Diagnostics SRS

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset SRS error codes.

Note: Recorded faults are historical and can not be cleared.

Work Support

Work Support functions allow users to perform the advance service procedures. Those procedures may need to be performed after replacement parts are installed.

Program Immobiliser Key – allows to register the Nissan transponder keys with the Immobiliser Note: The immobiliser security PIN CODE needs to be known. Initially all registered keys will be erased and all keys will need to be reregistered.

OBDII Self Diagnostics

OBDII Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset ECU error codes.

OBDII Monitor Status

OBDII Monitor Status shows the current status of various monitoring systems used by the car’s engine management system.

OBDII Log Analyser

Log Analyser is used to review log files previously generated by with Data Logging function. Graphs are drawn by selecting boxes next to parameter value. Graph colours match the parameter value colours.

OBDII Fuel System Satus

OBDII Fuel System Status can be used to check if the car’s fuel system is running in Closed Loop mode.

Fuel systems do not normally refer to injector banks. They are intended to represent completely different fuel systems that can independently enter and exit closed loop fuel. Banks of injectors on a V-engine are generally not independent and share the same closed-loop enablement criteria.

OBDII Data Logging

Selected OBDII parameters can be logged to a file. The data log file can then be analysed using the Log Analyser function.

Due to the slow nature of OBDII protocol it’s recommended to log only the required parameters.

my4dsc: 1172

Member Credit: The Wizard

Why? So that one of the bends of the 2.5″ charge pipe can be eliminated (the retarded chamfered elbow) and ease of configuration for those who want to upgrade to a 3″ charge pipe system. Re-clocking the blower also gets the charge pipe away from the back of the headlight and allows a lot more room for those who do headlight retrofits. (My chamfered elbow was rubbing my OEM headlight bulb connection and causing it to flicker on and off)

Keep in mind that if you’re keeping the 2.5″ charge pipe that originally was provided in the Stillen kit, then you’ll have to cut off a portion at the end of the charge pipe (at the second bend near the SC mounting plate) and get a new silicone 90 degree coupler (2.75″ to 2.5″) to reconfigure the system. If you’re upgrading to a 3″ charge pipe, then you’ll have to buy quit a bit more including: piping/couplers/your choice of BOV, Maf adapter etc.

Where? In your car, blower fully installed and mounted to the engine. It’s a common misconception that the blower must be removed from the car in order to re-clock the blower. You do not have to take the blower off the car, unless you run into the problem stated in the disclaimer below. This probably goes without saying, but re-clocking the blower while installed in the car allows you to fine tune and find the perfect angle in such a way that the 90 degree silicone elbow is situated just right and allows proper hood clearance. If the blower was removed from the car, then you’ll be taking the trial and error approach and burning a lot of time taking the blower/plate on and off/re-clocking the blower in order to find the perfect angle.

Here’s how the blower looks as Stillen/Vortech intended (2.5″ charge pipe, two bends at/near blower outlet)

Here’s how the blower looks re-clocked (3″ charge pipe, one 90 degree bend)

Here’s how to re-clock (rotate) your blower

Pic 1Pic 2

Look near the oil feed fitting and you’ll see a hold down plate and two allen screws. (See Pic 2) Keep in mind, there is still one more hold down plate and two screws to locate. See pic 1 for both plates (outlined in red) and all 4 screws (noted in green). Although the blower is installed in the car and space is limited, you should have no problem getting to the plates and allen screws. The hold down plate and screws holds the scroll to the blower itself. Loosen the screws quit a bit until you are able to re-clock (rotate) the blower’s outlet. You can remove the screws and hold down plates if you find it easier or the scroll isn’t rotating freely. Now re-clock the blower’s outlet to the desired position. Tighten the allen screws to prevent any further rotation and snug things back up the way they were. If you removed the 4 allen screws and 2 plates, reinstall them at this time.

* Some people have reported that they have 5 screws and 3 hold down plates. If you can’t re-clock the scroll after undoing/removing the 4 screws and 2 hold down plates as stated above, then look for a fifth screw and small hold down plate. This small hold down plate is only slightly bigger than the screw head itself. This 5th screw and small plate is noted in blue in Picture #1.

Disclaimer: Some people have it easier than others. Some discover that one of the plates is easily accessible (12 o’clock position) while the other is impossible to get to (6 o’clock position) while the blower is installed in the car. If this is the case, you may have to remove/uninstall your blower from your Maxima to gain accessibility to the hidden plate and screws. If so, feel free to relocate the plate and screws to a more accessible location anywhere around the perimeter of the scroll. Just keep in mind, that wherever you install one plate, the other plate should be on the opposite side of the scroll. When I re-clocked my blower, I had it easy. Both of my plates and 4 screws were easily accessible (3 o’clock and 9 o’clock position) [Positions are based on the individual standing at the passenger side of the car and looking at the blower]

my4dsc: 150

Member Credit: 99BlackMaxMS

So upon installation of the kit, my car developed a small oil leak that turned worse as time passed. It started after installing the supercharger, so I tried everything possible. I replaced sandwich plate & fittings, feed line fitting and eventually after pulling the blower, I saw that it was not coming from the drain back tube or seal on the drain back nipple. The drain back tube was not kinked either.

So this is about 2 months of driving with the leaking seal…

The cleanup process was possibly the most tedious task of this whole process

First step is to take the blower off the plate, then remove the pulley. Here is the blower with the pulley off, as you can see there is a whole lot of oil around the input shaft.

In order to take the front cover off, you need a standard allen set (I can’t remember the exact size, but I got a variety pack at Lowe’s for $20 that you’ll need anyways to take the blower off the plate).

Remove the 10 allen bolts. Next, use a small flat head screwdriver to pry the front cover off the two pegs that keep the cover aligned.

Front Cover:

Supercharger internals:

Note: You can see the two “pegs” in the last picture that are at the two oval ends. The input shaft/gear is on the right and the impeller gear is on the left. There are 2 sets of bearings, one for each shaft.

You can see in this picture how destroyed the seal actually is…

Next, take a large socket (I used a 27mm) and press out the old seal and tap the new one in. Here’s the remains of my old seal…

And here is the front cover with the new seal installed and all cleaned up

Back side:

S/C internals with the old seal removed and double checked to see there was no remains in the input shaft bearings. Also make sure you clean up the entire front surface where the front o-ring seal is seated.

Finally, you need to replace the large front cover o-ring seal, as they are a one time use seal. Also make sure that both metal gaskets that go over the bearings are in their original place, the flat one directly on the bearings, and the wavy one on the outermost part of the cover.

Finish by tapping the front cover on softly with your hands or with a rubber mallet, making sure that the o-ring stays placed (sorta a pita, it took a couple tries but finally got it).

Finally put the 10 allen bolts back on to seal the front cover to the blower. I torqued them relatively tight (hand tightened) and did not use any thread locker/sealant, as there was none previously on the threads.

Put the pulley back on, and throw the plate back together and you’re good to re-install on the car.

Here is the link for the website that I bought the seals. You need:

So when all said and done, I spent $45 dollars and about an hour of my time that would have cost me $380 plus shipping and 3-8 weeks down time of sending the blower into Vortech for a rebuild. Granted they would have replaced the remaining seals and bearings, but there was no need for them to be done. Also props to s1mplyV for moral support while I undertook this relatively simple task. And thanks again George for talking me into doing it myself.

my4dsc: 92