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my4thgen 95-99

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Member Credit: shift_ice

There are many rotor and brake pad options for the Maxima. Check out the brake choice how-to if you’re having problems deciding. In this how-to, I install Hawk HPS pads and Brembo blank rotors, though the process will be the same for any OEM replacements.

The new equipment:

Tools/Supplies:

  • Lug wrench
  • Hammer – the bigger the better!
  • Socket wrench
  • 14mm, 17mm & 19mm sockets
  • Rotors
  • Brake Pads
  • Disc Brake Caliper compressor (aka caliper spreader) tool (available on loan from many autopart stores)
  • Hanger
  • Wire Brush
  • Piece of scrap wood (optional, useful if rotor is rusted on)
  • Brake grease (typically available at the front counter of most autopart stores)
  • Brake Cleaner
  • Jack
  • Jack stands
  • Wheel chuck
  • Old rag
  • Torque wrench
  • Turkey baster (optional, to remove extra brake fluid from reservoir)

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Place car on level ground. This is very important since you’re removing the brakes! Chuck the rear wheels and pull parking brake while doing the front wheels. Jack up the front of the car using the jack point outlined in the manual.
2. Remove wheel using lug wrench


3. Remove the 3 17mm bolts that attach the caliper. There are two on top and one toward the bottom of the caliper bracket.

NOTE: Do NOT remove the bolt that connects the brake line to the caliper. This will introduce air into the brake system and you will have to bleed the brakes to get the air out. The brakes will be very spongy until this is resolved.

So keep the brake line connected and hang the caliper to avoid strain on the line as described in the next step.

Removing the top brake caliper bolt:


4. The caliper should easily slide right off the rotor after removing the above 3 bolts. Hang the caliper with an old coat hanger from the top of the spring. Never let the caliper hang from the brake line – it can damage the brake line and cause a leak.

Caliper hanging from hanger:


5. Remove the two 19mm bolts on the back of the caliper mounting bracket.

Two bolts circled in red:


6. NOTE: This step and any steps below relating to the rotor, only apply if you’re replacing the rotors as well. If the brake pedal pulsates when you press on the brake, you might consider replacing the rotors as well. This is typically noticable when braking harder at faster speeds such as when exiting the highway on an offramp.

Remove the rotor. Depending on the age of the vehicle and climate, the rotor may be rusted on. My Maxima was only 3 years old and my rotor was rusted on tight. To remove a rusted rotor there are a number of options:
Apply a liberal amount of WD-40 to back of the rotor and inside the lug holes on the front. Allow to soak. After a few minutes of soaking, use a large hammer and strike the back of the rotor in various locations to help dislodge it. If you are removing the rotor so it can be machined at a shop, be sure to use a piece of old scrap wood so you don’t damage the back of the rotor by striking it directly with a hammer. I started with a rubber mallet but eventually had to use a large steel hammer to knock my rotor loose.
Alternatively, you can use the holes on the caliper mounting bracket to help push the rotor off. This requires a 4″ long, 1/2″ wide bolt with a matching washer and nut.

7. Open brake fluid reservoir and wrap an old rag around it to catch any spill.
8. Compress the caliper pistion using a C-clamp or Caliper piston compressor tool. The C-clamp method only works on the front brakes since the rear piston must be twisted as it is compressed (the piston caliper tool naturally does this). While there are a variety of piston compressor tools, the general premise is to place the flat metal plate inside the caliper and twist the bolt until the strike plate (which rests against the piston) presses the piston back into the caliper. See the picture below. If you choose to use a C-clamp, place the old pad against the caliper piston so the c-clamp doesn’t press directly against the piston and mar the metal.

NOTE: As you compress the piston, the brake fluid level will rise. Keep an eye on the brake fluid level and siphon out any extra fluid or cleanup any spill that occurs. I recommend siphoning out some of the fluid since brake fluid is hard on paint.

Brake caliper compression tool kit:


9. Note the orientation of the pads. It’s also good idea to do one wheel at a time so you can always reference the other wheel if you have any question on how to orient the pads on reinstall.

Only one of the two bolts that need removed are visible here:


10. Remove the two 19mm caliper mounting bracket bolts (the cradle that holds the pads).

11. If the old rotor was stuck, use a wire brush to clean the hub face. Optionally, you can apply a small amount of grease to the hub face to keep the new rotor from sticking sometime down the road.
12. Before installing the new rotor, it’s important to clean it off with rubbing alcohol and brake cleaner or rubbing alcohol. Rotors are shipped from the factory with a protective coating to keep them from rusting before sale. Use a liberal amount of brake cleaner and give it a good scrub until it no longer feels like it has a film on it. Once clean, install the new rotor by sliding it over the lugs.

New rotor installed:


13. Remove the old brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket and clean the shims and hardware thoroughly with brake cleanup. Use a clean rag to scrub off deposits. Make sure this hardware is smooth and clean. The pads slide back and forth in this hardware so it’s important to make sure the path is smooth as possible. Once clean, dry them off.

14. Apply grease to all the touch points in the channel where the pads sit. Apply a liberal amount of grease on the back of the brake pads and reinstall the shims. Apply grease to the points on the caliper mounting hardware where the pad will sit.

Apply grease to the following points on the brake pad. This is the back pad so the shim is smaller. Apply a liberal amount of grease to the back of the pad wherever the shim and the pad meet.

Apply grease to the following areas on the brake pad

15. Reinstall caliper mounting bracket and torque bolts to 53-72 ft. lbs. Insert pads back into caliper mounting bracket and slide caliper over the pads.

16. Reattach caliper to caliper mounting bracket and tighten caliper mounting bolts to 16-23 ft lbs.

Completed job:

17. Check brake fluid level. Add fluid from a brand new bottle of brake fluid as needed. It’s important not to use brake fluid that has already been opened because brake fluid soaks up moisture overtime reducing its effectiveness.

18. Reinstall wheel, remove wheel chucks, and lower car.

19. IMPORTANT: You must bed the brake pads after installation. This is very important to help avoid squeaking down the road. The specific bedding procedure is typically provided with the brake pads, but the general rule is to drive around 45 and brake hard, releasing the brake right before coming to a stop. Repeat this process 4 or 5 times.

20. While not required, it’s a good idea to bleed the brakes after doing a brake job.

21. The pictures above are for the front brakes, but doing the back is just the same with a couple minor differences:

Remove the 14mm bolt holding the mount for the emergency brake cable to get the upper part of the caliper off.
The lower piece of caliper has 17mm bolts.

The piston must be turned clockwise to be compressed. Make sure the end of the caliper compressor is inserted properly into the grooves in the piston so the tool actually twists the piston as it compresses.

Hook the emergency brake cable back onto the spring mechanism before reinstalling the upper caliper piece. It’s hard to hook up after the caliper is assembled.

To get the rear caliper back over the rotor, you must turn the cylinder so the nub lines up with the groove it slides into.

Edit: Here’s a few more notes submitted from reader ajahearn:
Some vented rotors are directional so people need to pay attention to the one to install.
Slotted/drilled/dimpled/etc rotors are supposed to be non-directional but some manufacturers want you to install them such that the first dimple/part of the slot/etc that reaches the pad needs to be at the top with the idea that any grabbing will pull the pads inward toward the hub and not force them upward away from the hub.

The caliper should never be left hanging from the brake line – it should always be supported by a hanger or bungy cord.

For the rear piston, the boot may start to bind and make it harder to compress/rotate. To resolve, occasionally back off (counter clockwise) to get the boot to straighten and then start again. And opening the bleed valve makes it considerably easier to turn the piston back in. Of course you need to have a hose to prevent the fluid from spraying

my4dsc: 124

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Member Credit: shift_ice

Over time the brake system can take on air as the effectiveness of the brake fluid decreases with age. Air can also enter the system from a leaky brake hose, a bad connection on the brake caliper, during any maintenance when a brake line is removed, or if the fluid reservoir is allowed to run dry.

Air in the line makes the brake pedal feel mushy, and bleeding the brakes is the solution to that embarrassing mushy pedal feel. While we’re on the topic, if you’re not happy with the factory brake feel even after the system is properly bled, replacing the factory brake lines with more sturdy steel braided lines can greatly increase pedal firmness and brake feel.

Ttools/Supplies:

  • Lug wrench
  • 14mm wrench
  • Jack
  • Clear Jar
  • Small hose at least 6″ long. Approximate diameter of bleed valve. The tighter fit the better. Auto parts store should have small vacuum hose that will work.
  • Fresh jar of brake fluid (do not use a previously opened container since brake fluid takes on moisture over time.
  • An assistant or speed bleeders.

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Place the car on level ground, chuck the rear wheels, and make sure car in park (or in gear if a manual). Make sure parking brake ISN’T on. If you have ABS, remove the ABS fuse.

2. Pump the brakes multiple times to release any residual vacuum in the lines.

3. Remove the brake fluid reservoir cap and fill the reservoir with fresh brake fluid. Check this level often as you bleed the brakes. Never let it get too low because if it gets empty it introduces air back into the brake system and you have to start all over!

Bleed the brakes in the following order:

1. Passenger rear
2. Driver front
3. Driver rear
4. Passenger front
4. Remove the rubber boot on top of the bleeder screw. Attach a hose to the bleed screw and insert the end of the hose into a clear jar that is partially filled with brake fluid.

The bleed screw with the rubber boot still on:

Bleed screw

Hose attached to bleed screw:

Hose attached to caliper bleeder screw


5. Have your girlfriend press firmly on the brake (you’re killing time reading this on the internet so you obviously have one…right?). While the brake is depressed, loosen the bleed screw. If your girlfriend freaks out at this point because the pedal just fell to the floor, throw an empty beer can at her and tell her to quiet down. Or, if you’re not much for the single life, you can be the nice guy. “Honey, that it is completely normal. I just loosened the bleeder screw which allows the brake pressure to escape…oh, and I sure like those new strappy shoes of yours.” Totally your call on this one.

Anyway, back on topic. When you loosen the bleed screw with the brake depressed, you will see brake fluid flow through the hose and into the jar. Watch the tip of the hose for air bubbles – this is a sign that air is in the system. When the flow of fluid stops, tighten the bleed screw and tell your girlfriend (assuming she’s still there) to release the brake. Repeat this process (press brake, loosen bleeder, check for bubbles, close bleeder, release brake) until there are no air bubbles released, only fluid.

If you mouthed off above and lost your assistant, don’t worry, this step can also be done alone if you buy a set of speed bleeders.

6. Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir and top off as needed. Take care not to overfill or spill because brake fluid is very hard on paint. As mentioned above, never let the reservoir get empty or it will introduce air into the system and you’ll have to start over. And let’s be honest, this job is barely enough fun to do once.
7. Repeat steps 4 -6 at each wheel in the order outlined above. For the front brakes, if you’re feeling lazy you can get away with not removing the wheels at all by turning the tires toward the brake you want to work on. It takes a skinny arm or a strange angle to get a wrench on the bleed screw, but it can be done.

A lazy man bleeding the front brake:

Bleeding the front brakes with the wheels on


8. When complete, do yourself a favor and double check that every bleed screw is tight. Remember, a loose bleed screw means no brake pressure and brake fluid spraying everywhere like a garden hose. And hey, that’s no fun. Well, unless you’re the lucky onlooker.

Seriously though, test the brakes on a flat surface before running out and terrorizing the neighborhood.

my4dsc: 45

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Member Credit: Greg

1.I bought the Hayden model 404 from Pep Boys for $49.99 plus tax. There were other smaller models, but I figured I would get the largest one practical. The 404 is considered “Heavy Duty” and is 7.5 inches tall by 15.5 inches wide, by 0.75 inches thick. It is supposed to lower your transmission fluid temperature by 70 degrees Farenheit. I would not recommend getting a cooler any larger than the 404, as it will be too big and difficult to install. In fact, the 403 would probably have been easier, as it is the same height, but 2.5 inches shorter.

Click the image to open in full size.

2.Here is everything that came in the kit. I bought an extra 4 feet of transmission cooler hose (not pictured) to use as the return line back to the transmission. The 4 feet of hose that comes with the cooler is not enough, since you will have to replace the stock transmission return line entirely. When you get the extra hose, DO NOT get fuel line, it is not the same. Ask specifically for transmission fluid hose!

Click the image to open in full size.

3.The picture below shows the A/C condenser before installation of the cooler. For optimal cooling effect the auxiliary transmission cooler should be mounted in front of the A/C condenser.

4.The cooler should be installed in “series” with the stock tranny cooler. To do this you have to locate the fluid return line. On the Maxima this is the upper line (without the “banjo” bolt). The two pictures below show the location of the transmission fluid lines before installation.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

5.It is necessary to remove the Driver’s Side Engine Undercover to expose the transmission fluid return line. The undercover is held in place with 7 bolts and one pop-on clip. I sacrificed the pop-on clip when I removed it. Casualty of tinkering with your car.

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6.Remove the two nuts which hold the radiator to the car frame. You need to be able to tilt the radiator back so there is room to work.

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7.I traced out a template for the cooler on a piece of plain folder paper. The purpose of this was simply so I could line everything up and get an idea of how things were going to fit, how the hoses would hang and where, etc., before committing. It was also helpful in aligning the 4 holes where the zip ties would pass through the A/C condenser.

Click the image to open in full size.

8.The next step is to take each 4-foot piece of transmission hose and secure it with the clamps provided to the cooler. Then carefully slide the cooler in place in front of the A/C condenser. You can slide it in from the top or bottom, it really doesn’t matter – just be very careful not to bend or damage the fins on the cooler or on the car’s radiator. They are very fragile and will bend easily.

Click the image to open in full size.

9. My personal recommendation is to insert the 4 zip ties through the cooler and the condenser from the grill side in towards the motor. It is much easier to do it this way and you will have a lot more room to insert the plastic cover caps in-between the condenser and the radiator than between the condenser and the grill. Trust me on this. Make sure to secure the 4 foam pads in between the cooler and the condenser before you insert the zip ties all the way through. This part takes a little bit of coordination, and a second hand wouldn’t hurt either.

Click the image to open in full size.

10. Once the cooler is secured properly to the condenser the next step is to remove the stock transmission fluid return line. The line is pre-bent and specialized for the stock setup and cannot be reused. The line is held in place at both ends by simple pressure clamps. I put a pan under the return line to catch about an ounce of transmission fluid which leaked out of the hose.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

11. Take one of the lines from the Hayden cooler and cut it to length. Run this line to the radiator output port and secure with clamp provided. Make sure that the line is not bent or kinked and that it is away from the transmission pan. I bought some 3/4-inch (19 mm) heater hose from NAPA and wrapped it around certain parts of the hoses that I thought might rub or chafe. It is an added protection and a good idea, in my opinion. Secure the second line from the cooler back to the top of the transmission. I secured all of the lines with wire ties to ensure that they would not droop or move around too much.

Click the image to open in full size.

12.Here is a different view of how the hoses are routed from the cooler to the transmission.

Click the image to open in full size.

13.I used a heavy duty zip tie to hold up the top line and keep it from sagging. I later changed the zip tie to black for looks.Click the image to open in full size.

14.The transmission cooler is barely visible through the front grill and is in an excellent location to receive high airflow. The cooler will help out if you do a lot of stop and go driving or “spirited” driving that tends to heat up a transmission. In any case, it certainly won’t hurt anything, and is fun for about a 3 hour job. After driving the car around for a day I had to add about a half quart of ATF to make up for the added volume the cooler provides.

my4dsc: 85

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Member Credit: MAXSE5SPD

REQUIRED PARTS
02+ 6spd maxima transmission. Sentra spec-v will also work (if you use Maxima bell housing)
5.5 gen 6spd maxima shifter assembly
5.5 gen 6spd maxima shifter cables
6spd drivers side axle
6spd pass axle*
6spd frame trans mount
6spd transmission mount
6spd flywheel
6spd clutch
5spd timing ring
6spd starter
6spd slave cylinder

OPTIONAL PARTS
Aftermarket 6spd flywheel with bolt on timing ring
Upgraded clutch
Custom 1″ lengthened pass axle
Axle seals **
Shifter assembly cover
Bolt on 5spd timing ring from travis(turbos13hatch)
Polyurethane shifter bushings
Short throw shifter
Stainless steel clutch line

PROCEDURE
I’m not going to go much into detail about removing the 5spd parts because if you are taking on this project, you can handle that.

Install shifter cables– pretty self explanatory, pull off the control cable cover, snake the cables in. I routed them to the pass side, above the ECU. boring out the hole wouldn’t be a bad idea, as it can be hard to move and bend the cables to route them correctly.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

It will be necessary to drill into the cover as the pre-drilled holes wont line up. i got the bottom one but not the top to line up.

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Click the image to open in full size.

I put dynamat on there to quiet the road noise, and keep water out.

Mount shifter assembly– pretty easy to do also, but it needs to be slightly modified. there are bushings on each of the 4 bolt holes, these bushings must be taking out in front because, if not, the bolts attached to the floor wont be tall enough to be used. you will need to 2 nuts and bolts for the back holes.

Click the image to open in full size.

Taking off the old 5spd mount- the old mount is held on with 8 spot welds, 4 on top and 4 on the side. either drill them out or grind them off.

Install 6spd flywheel– if you chose the route i took, you will take the 6spd cps off your aftermarket, then align that timing ring with your 5spd one from Travis, and drill out the corresponding holes. then reattach the timing ring with the supplied bolts and some blue locktite. since, you are using a 5spd cps, you don’t need to clock the timing ring, so just install the flywheel by aligning the dowel pin and tightening the bolts in a criss-cross pattern, to the torque specs

Correct fidanza maxima flywheel

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POS XTD 350z flywheel

Click the image to open in full size.

The clutch disk and pp are easy to install, just make sure to clean the pp and flywheel well, and torque the pp to the correct specs in the correct sequence.

Trans mount install- you can either weld this mount to the frame or bolt it to the frame. i decided to bolt it to the frame, because i didn’t have access to a welded. but if you bolt it to the frame, you will need to cut a small, rectangular hole in the outward facing side of the frame to be able to anchor the bolts with the supplied nuts. you will need to install the transmission on the engine to align the mounts. get the transmission on, use a couple bolts to get the trans flush with the block. Reinstall the front cross member if unbolted. bolt on the trans mounted bracket on the transmission, then attach the frame mounted mount with the supplied bolt. then set the frame mount flush on the frame and mark the holes. unbolt both brackets, lower the front cross member, and uninstall the transmission if necessary. drill the holes for the mount. then cut the rectangular hole on the outward facing side of the frame. then tighten the nuts on the bolts, securing the frame mount.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Moving the abs modulator– modulator is bolted to a bracket, that bolts to the inner frame rail. this bracket needs to be gotten rid of. i used zip ties to pull it upwards by the master cylinder.

Click the image to open in full size.

Transmission install– its easiest to do with someone under lifting it up and someone up top helping. the shift assembly should be pushed down and inward, and the shifter cable bracket should be uninstalled to make installation easier. make sure mating surface between block and bell housing is clean, to avoid starter grounding problems. torque the trans bolts to spec and in the proper sequence. reinstall the shift cable bracket. raise the front of the sub frame, so the cables can be attached to the shift assembly using cotter pins and the cables installed in the bracket using the appropriate clips.

Click the image to open in full size.

Attach mount bracket to transmission, then jack up front sub frame, so the 2 mount parts can be joined. torque the front sub frame and the mount bolt to spec.

Starter install– the 6spd starter ground cable is a female connector, so is the connector on the engine harness. i cut both connectors off, and wired them together. then bolted the starter in, and connected up the pos. cable.

Click the image to open in full size.

You can see the heat sink in the lower left of the pic.

Relocating cps– the RWD 6spd flywheel has a different offset than the FWD 6spd flywheel, so the cps hole will need to be enlarged, and a new hole for the bolt will need to be drilled and tapped.

Click the image to open in full size.

sr20den said it was 6.7mm (If I remember correctly). i didn’t actually measure, I drew a line on the bell housing and on the cps, just bored the hole out to the drivers side, until the car would start and run. then mark, drill, and tap the hole.

Here is the what the 6speed flywheel bolts look like. You will need these to bolt most aftermarket flywheels on and maybe the stock one too!

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

================================================== ========================================
Note:
For what it’s worth, I thought I’d post up pics of the size difference in the 3.0 and 3.5 flywheels: These are Fidanza flywheels. The 3.0 is a little over 11lbs, but the 3.5 actually weighed in at 15.6 according to my scale (2lbs more than the advertized 13.5lbs).

3.5
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3.0

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Undersides, 3.0 on the left

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Offset difference:

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my4dsc: 32

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Member Credit: Rob

1. General Overview

If you can install a car alarm, you can install this kit. However, if you make a mistake, it may render your car undriveable. Please take your time and following all the test procedures listed in the installation guide.

Disclaimer: Because this is a do it yourself modification, I will not be responsible for either the INSTALLATION, USE, or FUNCTION of this kit. Proceed with caution and at your own risk. This kit is for OFF-ROAD use only.
1.1 Kit Contents

The kit includes:

* A. Manumatic Controller Box
* B. Power Cable
* C. Control Cable (7 ft)
* D. Relay Module
* E. Remote LED Display and Cable (optional, 7ft)

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 1. Kit Contents

1.2 Equipment Needed

* philips screwdriver
* wire cutter / wire stripper
* electrical tape
* solder gun and solder
* double sided tape

You must solder all wire connections for solid contacts.

1.3 Connector Locations

There are only 2 areas of the car where we need to perform wire cutting and splicing.

The first area is the ASCD Connector (M30). The ASCD connector is out in the open, located near the driver’s right knee (shown below).

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 2. ASCD Connector

The second area is the TCM Connectors. For the 1998-1999 Maxima, there are 2 TCM Connectors (F109 and F108, shown in Figure 3a below). The TCM Connectors are accessible by removing the ashtray assembly. F109 is on the left and F108 is on the right.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 3a. TCM Connectors in 1998-1999 Maxima (F109 on left, F108 on right)

For the 1995-1997 Maxima, there is only 1 TCM Connector (protected by a bolt shown in Figure 3b below). The TCM Connector is accessible by removing the ashtray assembly. Thanks go to Eric W. for tracking down the following images and diagrams.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 3b. TCM Connector in 1995-1997 Maxima

1.4 Kit Layout

The following diagram shows the recommend layout of the kit’s components.

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Figure 4. Kit Layout

The Manumatic Controller Box is placed under the driver’s seat. The Relay Module is taped to the inside of the dash. Where to put the optional “Remote LED Display” is left up to you.

1.5 Wire Colors

The following table shows color codes used to represent different wire colors.
B = Black
W = White
R = Red
G = Green
L = Blue
Y = Yellow
G = Light Green
BR = Brown
OR = Orange
P = Pink
PU = Purple
GY = Gray
Figure 5. Wire Colors

When the wire color is striped, the base color is given first, followed by the stripe color as shown below:
Example: L/W = Blue with White Stripe

1.6 Wire Modifications

We will be making wire connections in 2 different ways: tapping and highjacking.

Tapping a wire involves the addition of a new wire to an existing wire. The existing wire must NOT be cut. The following diagram shows a before and after picture.

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Figure 6. Tapping an Existing Wire

Highjacking a wire involves the cutting of the existing wire and attaching 2 new wires to the cut ends. The following diagram shows a before and after picture.

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Figure 7. Highjacking an Existing Wire


2.0 Installation

The installation should take you one day. The instructions will start by asking you to remove/loosen interior trim pieces to bring the work areas into view. Try to get to know where the wires and components will go before installing anything. During the installation, there will be tests which you should run to help verify proper installation. Install the Remote LED Display last in case you run out of daylight (since it’s optional).

2.1 Accessing the TCM Connectors

Start by removing the shifter trim and then the ashtray assembly (shown in figure below).

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 8. Dash Trim Removal

Lift the shifter trim and then pull it towards you. Remove the power plug for the cigarette lighter and set the shifter trim aside. Remove the single screw holding the ashtray assembly in place. Pull the ashtray assembly out (it’s now held in place by 1 clip on the right side). Remove the ashtray light plug and then set the ashtray aside.

The TCM should now be visible. Unplug the TCM connector(s) (see Figures 9a and 9b shown below). We will connect wires to these connectors later. If your hands are too big or if you are claustrophobic, then remove the stereo for more space to work in.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 9. TCM Connectors in 1998-1999 Maxima (F109 on left, F108 on right)

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Figure 9. TCM Connector in 1995-1997 Maxima

2.2 Loosen Center Console

You only need to loosen the center console to run the cables from under the driver’s seat to the dash. Start by removing the top 2 screws on the center console (shown below).

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Figure 10. Center Console Screws – Top Front

Next, remove the 2 screws in the back of the center console (1 on either side).
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Figure 11. Center Console Screws – Bottom Rear

2.3 Install Cables

Try to visualize where all the wires and components will go before installing cables.

When you are ready to begin, locate the controller (yellow), display (blue), and power (red/black) cables (see Figure 1). Each cable should have a connector on one end and bare wires on the other end.

Start by placing the connector end of all 3 cables under the driver’s seat. Route the cables under the seat rail into the center console. Tie the cables so that moving the seat does not cut the wires.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 12. Put Cable Connectors Under Driver’s Seat

Next, route the cables along the center console towards the dash (shown in the following 2 pictures). Tie the cables to the existing wires running along the center console.

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 13. Route Cables Through The Center Console Towards The Dash

The power cable ends in the dash where we will, later, connect it to the cigarette lighter.

Route the remote LED display cable (blue) through the dash and out the back of the dash (towards the gas pedal). We will mount the remote LED display last.

The controller cable (yellow) splits at the dash. Some wires will stay in the dash (for connection to TCM and relay module) while the rest will go through the back of the dash (for connection to ASCD).

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 14. Yellow Cable Split

Splitting from the yellow cable is a 3 pin connector. This will be connected to the relay module. Also splitting from the yellow cable are 2 wires (green, white/green) which will be connected to the TCM. Route the remainder of the yellow cable through the back of the dash. These wires will be connected to the ASCD control unit.

2.3 Connect ASCD Wires

The following diagram shows the ASCD connector, as-is. On this connector, we are only interested in 3 wires (pin 1 – Accel, pin 2 – Coast, pin 4 – Cruise). Make sure you identify the wires by both its color code and its relative location to other wires.

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Figure 15. ASCD Connector Pinout

First, locate the green/orange “Accel” wire (pin 1 of ASCD connector). Next, locate the orange/white wire in the yellow control cable. We will tap into the “Accel” wire by connecting the orange/white wire to the green/orange wire (show below). Be sure to solder all connections together.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 16. Modified ASCD Connector

In a similar fashion, we will tap into the “Coast” wire (pin 2 of ASCD connector) by connecting the orange wire from the control cable to the green/yellow wire.

Finally, tap into the “Cruise” wire (pin 4 of ASCD connector) by connecting the blue wire from the control cable to the green/white wire.

2.4 Connect Relay Module Wires

Start by unplugging the wires connected to the relay module (shown in figure below). We will connect these wires to the TCM. Later, we will plug the connector end back into the relay module.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 17. Relay Module Wires

For 1998-1999 Maximas, follow the instructions in section 2.4.1. For 1995-1997 Maximas, follow the instructions in section 2.4.2.

2.4.1 Connect Relay Module Wires to 1998-1999 Maxima

The following diagram shows connector F109, as-is. On this connector, we are only interested in 3 wires (pin 26, 27, and 34). Make sure you identify the wires by both its color code and its relative location to other wires.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 18. F109 Connector Pinout

Locate the Yellow/Blue wire on F109 (pin 34). Now locate the green wire and the yellow wire on the relay cable. We will highjack pin 34 with these 2 wires. Start by cutting the Yellow/Blue wire (pin 34). Connect the green wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the yellow wire to the half going towards the TCM (F109).

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 19. Modified F109 Connector

In a similar fashion, we will highjack pin 26 on F109 (Purple/White). Start by cutting the Purple/White pin 26 wire. Connect the brown wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the black wire to the half going towards the TCM (F109).

Lastly, highjack pin 27 on F109 (Pink/Black). Start by cutting the Pink/Black pin 27 wire. Connect the orange wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the red wire to the half going towards the TCM (F109).

2.4.2 Connect Relay Module Wires to 1995-1997 Maxima

The following diagram shows the TCM connector, as-is. For now, we are only interested in 3 wires (pin 16, 17, and 18). Make sure you identify the wires by both its color code and its relative location to other wires.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 18. TCM Connector Pinout for 1995-1997 Maxima

Locate the Yellow/Blue wire (pin 18). Now locate the green wire and the yellow wire on the relay cable. We will highjack pin 18 with these 2 wires. Start by cutting the Yellow/Blue wire (pin 18). Connect the green wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the yellow wire to the half going towards the TCM.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 19. Modified TCM Connector Pinout for 1995-1997 Maxima

In a similar fashion, we will highjack pin 16 (Purple/White). Start by cutting the Purple/White pin 16 wire. Connect the brown wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the black wire to the half going towards the TCM.

Lastly, highjack pin 17 (Pink/Black). Start by cutting the Pink/Black pin 17 wire. Connect the orange wire to the half coming from the gearshifter. Connect the red wire to the half going towards the TCM.

2.5 Connect Remaining TCM Wires

We only need 2 more wires on the TCM connector(s). For 1998-1999 Maximas, see section 2.5.1. For 1995-1997 Maximas, see section 2.5.2.
2.5.1 Connect Remaining TCM Wires on 1998-1999 Maxima

The following diagram shows the F108 connector, as-is. On this connector, we are only interested in 2 wires, pins 13 and 22. Make sure you identify the wires by both its color code and its relative location to other wires.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 20. F108 Connector Pinout

First, locate pin 13 on F108 (White wire). Next, locate the Green/White wire from the yellow control cable. We will tap into the pin 13 by connecting the green/white wire to the white wire (show below).

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 21. Modified F108 Connector

In a similar fashion, we will tap into pin 22 on F108 (Green/Yellow) by connecting the green wire from the control cable to it. Be sure to solder all connections together.

2.5.2 Connect Remaining TCM Wires on 1995-1997 Maxima

The following diagram shows the next 2 wires on the TCM connector that we will be working on (pins 3 and 39). Make sure you identify the wires by both its color code and its relative location to other wires.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 20. Original OD Wires on TCM Connector for 1995-1997 Maxima

First, locate pin 3 (White wire). Next, locate the Green/White wire from the yellow control cable. We will tap into the pin 13 by connecting the green/white wire to the white wire (show below).

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 21. Modified OD Wires on TCM Connector for 1995-1997 Maxima

In a similar fashion, we will tap into pin 39 (Green/Yellow) by connecting the green wire from the control cable to it. Be sure to solder all connections together.

2.6 Connect Power Wires

Only 2 more wires to go. Locate the cigarette plug which we discounted earlier.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 22. Cigarette Plug

We’ll tap power and ground from this plug (connector). Locate the supplied power cable (red and black wire). Connect the red wire from the power cable to the Orange/Black cable in the cigarette plug. Connect the black wire from the power cable to the Black cable in the cigarette plug.

Click the image to open in full size.
Figure 23. Modified Cigarette Plug

2.7 Connect the Relay Module

Plug the relay module into the matching 6 pin connector that you wired in section 2.4. Plug the 3 pin connector on the relay module into the matching 3 pin connector on the yellow control cable. Use some double sided tape to hold the relay module to the inside of the dash.

This is a good time to make sure your car still works as before. First, tie down all the cabling and set the center console in its normal place so that nothing interferes with the gearshifter. Plug the F108, F109, and the ASCD connectors back into their normal place. Start the car and check that the “D”, “2”, and “1” gear positions still work as before.

2.8 Test For Power

Let’s first check for proper power up of the manumatic controller box. Connect the power cable to the Manumatic Controller.

Turn the ignition to the ON position (but do not start the car). Make sure the RED led on the Manumatic Controller box turns on (has power).

2.9 Connecting Everything and Final Testing

Connect the yellow controller cable to the yellow connector on the manumatic controller box. Next, connect blue remote LED display cable to the blue connector on the controller box. For now, just leave the LED display somewhere visible to you while you are driving. Leave the controller box under the seat.

We are now ready to perform more tests. The following test will check to make sure the manumatic can cycle through the gears.

1. Make sure the gearshifter is in “Park”. Turn the ignition to the ON position (but do not start the car). The remote LED display should be OFF.
2. Press the middle button on the cruise cluster located on your steering wheel. The remote LED should still be OFF.
3. Put the Gear Selector in Drive (you will need to push the brake pedal in order to move the gear selector out of park). The remote LED should still be OFF.
4. Press the middle button on the cruise cluster located on the steering wheel. The remote LED should turn ON (displaying the number 3). Note that the OD OFF light in your instrument cluster should be ON.
5. Press the down button (bottom button on the cruise cluster). The remote LED should now display the number 2. Keep pressing the down button until the display cycles to 1. It should not go lower than 1. Note that the OD OFF light should still be ON.
6. Press the up button (top button on the cruise cluster). The remote LED should count up from 1 to 4. When you reach 4, the OD OFF light should turn OFF.
7. Press the middle button again. The remote LED display should turn OFF.
8. Put the gearshifter in “Park”, turn the ignition OFF, and remove the key.

If you pass the above test, then we’ll check that the manumatic is properly disabled when the gearshifter is not in Drive or when cruise control is ON.

1. Turn the ignition to the ON position (but do not start the car). The remote LED display should be OFF.
2. Put the Gear Selector in Drive (you will need to push the brake pedal in order to move the gear selector out of park). The remote LED should still be OFF.
3. Press the middle button on the cruise cluster located on the steering wheel. The remote LED should turn ON.
4. Shift the gear selector out of “Drive”, the remote LED should turn OFF.
5. Press the middle button again. The remote LED display should still be OFF.
6. Shift the gear selector back to “Drive”.
7. Press the middle button again. The remote LED display should turn ON.
8. Press the “Cruise On” button located on your dash (next to the security LED). The remote LED display should turn OFF.
9. Press the middle button again. The remote LED display should still be OFF.
10. Put the gearshifter in “Park”, turn the ignition OFF, and remove the key.

If you pass the above test, then you’re ready for a real driving test. Cautiously drive the car, in auto mode, to an empty parking lot or open space. From there, turn on manual mode and check for the following:

1. When in 1, the car does not shift up to 2,3,4 no matter what rpm.
2. When in 2, the car does not shift up to 3,4 no matter what rpm. Note that the car may shift down to 1 if going too slow.
3. When in 3, the car does not shift up to 4 no matter what rpm. Note that the car may shift down to 1,2 if going too slow.

Functionally, you’re done. From now on, you the buttons on the steering wheel to change gear selections when in manumatic mode. Do not use the gearshifter button (OD OFF) when in manumatic mode. It took me a few days to get used to keeping my right hand on the steering wheel.

2.10 Mounting the Optional Remote LED Display

The only thing left at this point is to mount the optional “Remote LED Display”. This step has been left to you to decide because your choice of where to install it determines the difficultly level.

Mounting the display inside the instrument cluster is the most difficult. Cheston has an excellent guide on how to access the instrument cluster.
How to Install Indiglo Dash Gauges

2.11 Maintenance

The only thing that may need replacement is the fuse located along the power cable. If it’s blown, replace it with a similar sized .5 amp 12v fuse. If it blows constantly, there maybe a problem with your car or with the manumatic controller.

3.0 Manumatic Operation

This modification gives older Maximas a “manumatic mode” similar to that found on newer cars. It’s a pretty simple concept and it’s operation is described below:

* Manumatic Mode is only available while the gearshifter is in “Drive” and the Cruise Control is OFF.
* Manumatic Mode is automatically turned OFF and disabled when you leave “Drive” or turn Cruise Control ON.
* Manumatic Mode reuses the cruise cluster buttons on your steering wheel to change gear selections.
* The middle button on the cruise cluster turns the manumatic on and off. The top button shifts up. The bottom button shifts down.
* Car will not shift into a higher gear than the gear displayed by the manumatic. For example, when it displays “2”, the car will not shift to 3 or 4.
* Car may shift into a lower gear than the gear displayed by the manumatic. For example, when it displays “2”, the car may shift to 1 if you are going too slow.
* You car will continue to work in auto mode, as before, if you remove the manumatic controller box (or if it loses power).

There’s not much to it when it comes to operation. Here’s more information I posted on maxima.org:

I’m glad other people are interested. I mainly did this
for myself and I spent a lot of time on the design. The main
criterias were:


SAFETY:

1. If the board loses power or is disconnected, your car’s auto
mode still works unchanged.

2. MMode is only available in “D” (you can toggle it on or off
at the steering wheel). If you shift out of “D”, then MMode is
automatically turned off and disabled.

3. If you turn on Cruise control, MMode is automatically turned off and disabled.

4. Shifting to a lower gear than your speed/engine allows will
result in a delayed shift, rather than your tranny dropping to the
ground (gears include 1,2,3,4).


KISS (keep it simple stupid):

5. Minimize the number of wires needed to installed and places
where you need to install them. Basically, you splice/highjack:
– 5 wires in the TCM connector (accessible behind the cigarette tray)
– 3 wires in the ASCD connector (out in the open, near your right knee)
– and finally, 12v and ground (which I take from the cigarette lighter)


STOCK LOOK (no radio shack switches poking out everywere)

6. Reuses existing cruise control buttons when in “D” and when cruise
is OFF. Middle button toggles MMode on/off. Top button goes up in
gear and bottom button goes down in gear. When cruise is on, buttons
act as normal cruise control buttons (MMode is automatically turned off
and disabled when cruise control is on).

7. The remote LED display is optional. You don’t have to have it.
If you want it, you can place it anywhere. Putting it in the instrument
cluster is the most stock looking but quick frankly, that was the hardest
part of the install.

Basically, MMode shifts the gear selector and controls OD for you.
No more accidental shifts into neutral. No more looking at the gear
selector to see where it is. No more micromanaging of “OD Off” button.

Here’s an example use:
– start car
– select “D” with existing gear selector
– drive somewhere
– press middle button to turn MMode on (Remote LED turns on)
– press down, up, down, down, up, up, etc…
– press middle button again to turn MMode off (Remote LED turns off)

Remember, changing the gear selector out of “D” or turning on Cruise
will turn off and disable MMode.

Read more: http://my4thgen.org/showthread.php?t=177#ixzz4VDZuUCaa

my4dsc: 47

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Member Credit: The Wizard

How to Re-clock your Supercharger
Why? So that one of the bends of the 2.5″ charge pipe can be eliminated (the retarded chamfered elbow) and ease of configuration for those who want to upgrade to a 3″ charge pipe system. Re-clocking the blower also gets the charge pipe away from the back of the headlight and allows a lot more room for those who do headlight retrofits. (My chamfered elbow was rubbing my OEM headlight bulb connection and causing it to flicker on and off)

Keep in mind that if you’re keeping the 2.5″ charge pipe that originally was provided in the Stillen kit, then you’ll have to cut off a portion at the end of the charge pipe (at the second bend near the SC mounting plate) and get a new silicone 90 degree coupler (2.75″ to 2.5″) to reconfigure the system. If you’re upgrading to a 3″ charge pipe, then you’ll have to buy quit a bit more including: piping/couplers/your choice of BOV, Maf adapter etc.

Where? In your car, blower fully installed and mounted to the engine. It’s a common misconception that the blower must be removed from the car in order to re-clock the blower. You do not have to take the blower off the car, unless you run into the problem stated in the disclaimer below. This probably goes without saying, but re-clocking the blower while installed in the car allows you to fine tune and find the perfect angle in such a way that the 90 degree silicone elbow is situated just right and allows proper hood clearance. If the blower was removed from the car, then you’ll be taking the trial and error approach and burning a lot of time taking the blower/plate on and off/re-clocking the blower in order to find the perfect angle.

Here’s how the blower looks as Stillen/Vortech intended (2.5″ charge pipe, two bends at/near blower outlet)

Click the image to open in full size.

Here’s how the blower looks re-clocked (3″ charge pipe, one 90 degree bend)

Click the image to open in full size.

Here’s how to re-clock (rotate) your blower

Pic 1
Click the image to open in full size.

Pic 2
Click the image to open in full size.

Look near the oil feed fitting and you’ll see a hold down plate and two allen screws. (See Pic 2) Keep in mind, there is still one more hold down plate and two screws to locate. See pic 1 for both plates (outlined in red) and all 4 screws (noted in green). Although the blower is installed in the car and space is limited, you should have no problem getting to the plates and allen screws. The hold down plate and screws holds the scroll to the blower itself. Loosen the screws quit a bit until you are able to re-clock (rotate) the blower’s outlet. You can remove the screws and hold down plates if you find it easier or the scroll isn’t rotating freely. Now re-clock the blower’s outlet to the desired position. Tighten the allen screws to prevent any further rotation and snug things back up the way they were. If you removed the 4 allen screws and 2 plates, reinstall them at this time.

* Some people have reported that they have 5 screws and 3 hold down plates. If you can’t re-clock the scroll after undoing/removing the 4 screws and 2 hold down plates as stated above, then look for a fifth screw and small hold down plate. This small hold down plate is only slightly bigger than the screw head itself. This 5th screw and small plate is noted in blue in Picture #1.

Disclaimer: Some people have it easier than others. Some discover that one of the plates is easily accessible (12 o’clock position) while the other is impossible to get to (6 o’clock position) while the blower is installed in the car. If this is the case, you may have to remove/uninstall your blower from your Maxima to gain accessibility to the hidden plate and screws. If so, feel free to relocate the plate and screws to a more accessible location anywhere around the perimeter of the scroll. Just keep in mind, that wherever you install one plate, the other plate should be on the opposite side of the scroll. When I re-clocked my blower, I had it easy. Both of my plates and 4 screws were easily accessible (3 o’clock and 9 o’clock position) [Positions are based on the individual standing at the passenger side of the car and looking at the blower]

my4dsc: 30

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my4dsc: 691

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