Category

my3rdgen 89-94

Category

Owner: Gustavo Castillo Jr

Year: 1993
Model: White
Color:  Custom Color
Transmission: 5-Speed Manual
Trim: SE

Its not a skyline by any means even if I did put the motor and transmission in it. It’s just a Maxima customized in a way others never attempted to do. I have no skyline badges on it as I had all badges shaved. To me my car is my baby Fantasma.

Mod List:

  • VE30DE Engine
  • 5-Speed Manual Transmission
  • OBX Headers
  • EGR Delete
  • eBay Cold Air Intake
  • 300ZX NA Catalytic Converter
  • Hayame DTX Muffler
  • Eibach Lowering Springs
  • Nissan Skyline GTR R34 Wheels w/ 235/45/R18 Ties
  • Slotted and Drilled Rotors
  • Premium Ceramic Brake Pads

Member Credit: choray911

This is a project that has been on my slate for a while, and I’m finally getting around to it. I have seen several people ask what the advantages of stiffer motor mounts are. The answer it simple, the more you reduce the amount the motor moves by rotational force, the more power you put to the pavement, and reduce wheel hop. They do not increase power but allow you to harness the power you already have. The downside is that engine vibration is greatly increased inside the cabin. There are trade-off in every project you take on.

Step 1

Jack up the car and support with jack stands. Remove the lower engine cradle. This can be done by supporting the weight of the motor with your floor jack to slowly lower it down. The tranny and timing cover mounts will support the motor while the lower support is out of the car. I’ve been turbo’d for 5 years, and I cannot recall if removal of the Y pipe is necessary. Use your own judgment.

Step 2

Once the mounts are out of the car, evaluate the condition of your mounts. You will want to remove a lot of the factory material; however, you do not want to change the location of the center bushing. Make sure you have a way to keep it in its factory location. I made sure I had plenty of rubber on both ends to keep it in place during curing.

Step 3

Remove as much factory material as you feel comfortable with. The more Poly you have in there the stronger it will be. To do so, I used an electric drill and several sized drill bits, and a set of needle-nosed pliers. There is considerable metal reinforcement on the inside of the mount, so don’t be too afraid to explore. Just remember to keep the center bushing centered.

Step 4

Cleanliness is next to Godliness! Get a bucket of hot soapy water and scrub away. The cleaner the inside of the mounts are the better the poly will stick to it. Depending on the funkiness, you might want to hit them with some degreaser first. Dawn dishwashing detergent works wonders. If your mom won’t get too upset, put them in the toaster oven at 200 degrees to for an hour or so, to make sure they are good and dry.

Step 5

Seal one side of the motor mount. Trace out the outer boundary of the mount on cardboard and cut it out. Lay the mount on its side and center the circle cardboard piece on the center bushing. Lightly tap the center of the cardboard to make an impression of the center bushing. Cut out the center impression a little small, and then force it onto the center bushing. This will stop the resin from pouring out the bottom. Cover the cardboard piece with aluminum foil, and pull it tight without tearing. Spray some sort of release agent (PAM, Olive oil, WD-40) only on the side that will make contact with the motor mount. Tape it into place using masking tape. Masking tape will not leave a residue like duct tape, but this is your project. Tape the ring securely to the mount. The more tape the better. There will be leaks that show up; this will just keep them at a minimum. Don’t forget to tape around the center hole really well. The resin pours in like warm molasses, and if it has a place to go, it WILL LEAK OUT. Then you have to start over.

Step 6

The Pour. The polyresin I used was Devcon, Flexane 94. It dries the hardest of their line; however, they do have Flexane 60 that is more flexable. It can be picked up at any industrial supply store, like Granger, for around $36. The kit comes with the resin, curing agent, plastic cup to mix it in, and a stir stick. One “kit” will build two mounts with some leftover if you remove a considerable amount of material from the factory mount. Place the mounts on their sides, and make them level. Rolls of duct tape or masking tape work. Combine the resin and activator according to the enclosed directions and stir for a good 7 to 10 minutes. The mixture has a work time of a good ten to fifteen minutes depending on temp and humidity. The warmer it is the faster it cures. You only have one shot at this, so make sure the mounts are ready to be filled. Pour slowly and try to keep from developing bubbles in the mount. Fill one-half full; fill the next one-half full, and then top off the first.

This gives the resin a chance to seep into all the nooks and crannies and allowing the air to escape. If small leaks appear, don’t freak out. The resin will thicken up and stop leaking. If a big leak shows up, get creative, you didn’t follow the directions.

Step 7

The Cure. The mixture will harden so that it can be handled within 30 to 45 minutes. To speed up this time, place them under a heat lamp. I have a torch lamp in my living room that has 3 adjustable lights that work perfectly. Remove the cardboard end and foil. They are hard in 24 hours and reach full stiffness within 7 days. If this is a two-day project then you can put them in the oven again at 200 degrees for 24 hours to speed up the cure.

Step 8

Reinstall.

This is a gallery of 3rd Gen Nssan Maxima’s 1989-1994.

If you are DIY person and love working on your Nissan Maxima, then this tool is a MUST HAVE! When you go to the Nissan dealer, the person working on your car typically uses a tool called a Nissan Consult. The Nissan Consult that the dealer uses costs thousand of dollars and is only available to dealers. By using the Nissan DataScan software, a laptop and a generic VAG COM OBDII adapter you can achieve just about the same level of on-board diagnosis that $5,000 Nissan Consult provides. This software allows you to:

  • Check CEL codes
  • Check/Reset ABS and SRS-Airbag Faults
  • Check/Reset TCM Codes
  • Adjust timing
  • Perform Idle Air Relearn
  • Reset ECU learned settings
  • Data-log
  • Program keys
  • Check Emissions Readiness Monitors
  • Active Test temporary modify some of the engine parameters for testing purposes
  • And Much much more….

The software itself costs $55.00 and generic cable costs around $7.00-$8.00. 

Software License Purchase Link: Nissan DataScan II

Software Download Links:

OBD2 Cable Order Links: 

You can find the cables on eBay between $12.00-$20.00 shipped. It ranges based on location and shipping. Search for the following keywords on eBay and you will find it: “KKL 409.1 VAG-COM OBD2 USB Cable

Below are all the functions it provides:

ECU Part Number

This is the main window of the NDSII software which shows the ECM Nissan Identification part number. Basic and Advance Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons, using the shortcut keys (F1 – F11) or using the Menu bar. Most functions except Data Replay and Log Analyser are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates communication between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Data Display Settings

This window is used to assign parameters to be displayed by the Data Display function. Only parameters that are supported by the currently connected ECU are available for selection. Gauges are counted from left to right, top to bottom. Multiple gauges can monitor the same parameter.

Data Logging ECM

Selected parameters can be logged to a file. This function can also be accessed from the Data Display window. The data log file can be analysed using the Data Replay or Log Analyser functions.

Self Diagnostics ECM

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset engine ECU error codes.

Idle Adjustment

Idle Adjustment function allows users to adjust the base idle RPM. The setting is saved to the ECU and it does not reset with engine restart.

Timing Adjustment

Timing Adjustment function allows users to adjust the base ignition timing. The setting is saved to the ECU and it does not reset with engine restart.

Active Test ECM

Active Test allows users to temporary modify some of the engine parameters for testing purposes. They return to their original values when a function is stopped, PC disconnected or engine restarted.

Note: It is possible to damage the engine if the A/F Base % functions is used to excessively modify fuel delivery. Likewise the engine may overheat if the Engine Temperature is set to low for a long period of time. Do not use those functions if you are not sure how they will effect your engine.

Work Support

Work Support functions allow users to perform some of the advance service procedures. Those procedures may need to be performed after replacement parts are installed.

Clear Self Learn – clears the A/F Base SL map learned by the ECU.

Idle Air Volume Learn – is an operation to learn the fully closed position of the throttle valve.

Program Immobiliser Key – allows to register the Nissan transponder keys with the Immobiliser Note: The immobiliser security PIN CODE needs to be known. Initially all registered keys will be erased and all keys will need to be reregistered.

Cylinder Power Test

Cylinder Power Test function can be used to identify cylinder that is under performing. This function allows shutting down individual cylinders. If all of the cylinders are producing the same amount of power the engine RPMs will drop exactly the same amount on each cylinder that is cancelled.

Log Analyser is used to review log files previously generated by with Data Logging function. Graphs are drawn by selecting boxes next to parameter value. Graph colours match the parameter value colours.

Speed Test

Speed Test is a unique function for measuring car’s acceleration performance. Predefined or user specific tests can be used. Due to the low resolution of Nissan speed sensors, measurements should only be used as a guide and not a true reflection of car’s performance.

Note: This function should not be used while driving on public roads.

Address Watch

Address Watch function is used for monitor specific ECU memory addresses. By monitoring a memory address extra information can be retrieved that is not normally available using Consult II protocol. A knock sensor reading can be obtain using this method if knock sensor memory address is known.

Wideband O2 sensor

Nissan DataScan II also supports wideband Air/Fuel ratio meters from Innovate Motorsports. A second serial port is used to connect to the controller and collect data.

The data from the wideband meter can be displayed or logged in conjunction with other engine parameters using the Data Logging function.

ECU Part Number BCM

The BCM tab shows the BCM Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. All functions are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Self Diagnostics BCM

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset BCM error codes.

Active Test BCM

Active Test allows users to temporally activate some of the functions of the BCM. This is usually used to manually test the functionality of the systems controlled by the BCM.

Note: Functions not supported by the BCM are disabled (grayed out).

ECU Part Number TCM

The TCM tab shows the TCM Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. Most functions except Data Replay and Log Analyser are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Data Logging TCM

Selected parameters can be logged to a file. This function can also be accessed from the Data Display window so the data can be logged while it is displayed. The data log file can be analysed using the Data Replay or Data Analyser functions.

Self Diagnostics TCM

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset TCM error codes.

ECU Part Number ABS

The ABS tab shows the ABS Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. Most functions except Data Replay and Log Analyser are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Data Logging ABS

Selected parameters can be logged to a file. This function can also be accessed from the Data Display window so the data can be logged while it is displayed. The data log file can be analysed using the Data Replay or Data Analyser functions.

Self Diagnostics ABS

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset ABS error codes.

Work Support ABS

Work Support functions allow users to perform advance service procedures. Those procedures may need to be performed after replacing parts.

Steering Angle Sensor Reset – After removing/installing or replacing VDC/TCS/ABS control unit, steering angle sensor, steering components, suspension components, and tires, or after adjusting wheel alignment, make sure to adjust neutral position of steering angle sensor before running vehicle.

ECU Part Number SRS

The SRS tab shows the SRS Nissan Identification part number. Basic Functions can be selected by clicking on the buttons or using the Menu bar. All functions are disabled until communication with the ECU is successfully established.

Progress bar at the bottom indicates data being send between the ECU and PC. If the bar is not moving there is no data being received from the ECU.

Note: Some vehicles may use K line for diagnostics of engine ECU (ECM) but still use DDL1 line for diagnostics of other control modules. This software does not support diagnostics over the DDL1 line. Some of those models are: X-trail, Maxima, Patrol.

Self Diagnostics SRS

Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset SRS error codes.

Note: Recorded faults are historical and can not be cleared.

Work Support

Work Support functions allow users to perform the advance service procedures. Those procedures may need to be performed after replacement parts are installed.

Program Immobiliser Key – allows to register the Nissan transponder keys with the Immobiliser Note: The immobiliser security PIN CODE needs to be known. Initially all registered keys will be erased and all keys will need to be reregistered.

OBDII Self Diagnostics

OBDII Self Diagnostics function allows users to read and reset ECU error codes.

OBDII Monitor Status

OBDII Monitor Status shows the current status of various monitoring systems used by the car’s engine management system.

OBDII Log Analyser

Log Analyser is used to review log files previously generated by with Data Logging function. Graphs are drawn by selecting boxes next to parameter value. Graph colours match the parameter value colours.

OBDII Fuel System Satus

OBDII Fuel System Status can be used to check if the car’s fuel system is running in Closed Loop mode.

Fuel systems do not normally refer to injector banks. They are intended to represent completely different fuel systems that can independently enter and exit closed loop fuel. Banks of injectors on a V-engine are generally not independent and share the same closed-loop enablement criteria.

OBDII Data Logging

Selected OBDII parameters can be logged to a file. The data log file can then be analysed using the Log Analyser function.

Due to the slow nature of OBDII protocol it’s recommended to log only the required parameters.

Owner: Aaron Kimball

Year: 1992
Model: Maxima
Color: White
Trim: SE
Engine: VQ35DE
Transmission: 4-Speed Automatic Transmission

Highlights:

  • This is the first known FULL 2002 ECU 3.5L swap into a 3rd gen Maxima.
  • On Sunday, February 16th, 2014, it ran an 11.97 @ 113.3mph in the 1/4 mile NATURALLY ASPIRATED! Took place at at Coastal Plains Dragway in Jacksonville, NC.
  • First Maxima to do 11s in the 1/4 mile All Motor.
  • Horsepower: 335HP at crank and 300 WHP ALL MOTOR
  • Curb Weight at track (with driver): 2600 lbs

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mod List:

Quick Car Info

  • 1992 Nissan Maxima SE w/ 3.5L Engine
  • Original Automatic Transmission w/ 215K+ miles (RE4F04V)
  • Engine from 02 Maxima w/ 49K miles
  • FULL ECU swap with 02 Maxima ECU, NATS, Ignition Switch, Steering wheel, & Cluster

Go Fast Mods and Engine Specs

  • VQ35DE Engine Swap with FULL ECU wiring
  • Fully Built Engine by NWP Engineering
  • Full Headwork by NWP Engineering (port & polish, intake ports matched, all obstructions removed, valves lapped, heads resurfaced, combustion chambers polished)
  • All Intake Manifolds ported and polished and matched by NWP Engineering
  • Upper Intake Manifold completely gutted and smoothed out
  • NWP 75mm Big Bore Throttle Body Kit
  • NWP Engineering Thermal Intake Spacers (To prevent thermal transfer of heat from lower intake manifold to upper manifold)
  • NWP Engineering Premium VIAS Block Plate
  • JDM Camshafts (260* duration & 10.9mm lift)
  • VQ35HR Head Gaskets w/ coolant passage modified on block (better coolant flow)
  • VQ35HR Valve Springs w/ an extra 1mm shim
  • VQ35HR Head Bolts
  • VQ35DE 06 350z RevUp Oil Pump
  • ARP Rod Bolts
  • New valve seals
  • R35 GTR Injectors (~560cc)
  • Walbro 255lph HP fuel pump
  • Nismo SR20DE Adjustable Fuel Pressure Regulator mounted on fuel rail in place of damper for a return style system (set to static 51psi)
  • Turbo XS UTEC Engine Management System
  • Fully tuned by National Speed, Inc in Wilmington, NC
  • Suprastick V4 Standalone Automatic Transmission Control Unit
  • Custom Equal Length Mandrel Ypipe made by RJ’s Custom Piping
  • McCord Power Plate Electric Exhaust 2.5″ Cutout
  • 3.5L Altima aftermarket headers (modified to fit engine bay)
  • K&N Cone Filter
  • 3.25″ ID MAF Housing
  • TransGo HD2 Shift Kit Valve Body Recalibration
  • Edge Racing 3800 High Stall Prototype Torque Converter
  • Custom Engine Tune program by NWP Engineering for 93 octane
  • Stock heat range NGK copper spark plugs (stock gap)
  • 15×8 Rota Slipstream wheels w/ 22x8x15 Mickey Thompson ET Drag Slicks OR
  • 14×6 OEM Ford Ranger wheels w/ 20x8x14 Mickey Thompson ET Drag Slicks

  • 1994 Mazda RX7 11lb 16×4 Enkei Aluminum Wheels w/ Metzeler motorcycle tires
  • 12lb Summit Racing Bucket Racing Seat
  • Manual Full Torque Converter Lockup and Overrun Clutch Function
  • Dynotune Nitrous Kit (not currently connected with new VQ35 engine)

Other Performance Mods

  • Custom Polyurethane Motor and Tranny Mounts – www.mcmaster.com Part # 8644K11
  • 14lb Lightweight Battery
  • Manual steering rack (Converted stock PS rack by removing seals)
  • Gauges (Coolant Temp, Tranny temp, Oil Pressure)
  • Turbo XS Tuner (Reg) Wideband 02 Sensor
  • Summit Racing Mechanical Fuel Pressure Gauge
    (with extended hose located outside the hood so gauge is readable while racing)
  • Auxiliary Transmission Cooler (not currently installed to help fluid get to proper operating temp)
  • 0w30 Amsoil SS Motor Oil
  • Custom Thermostat Modifcation to reduce opening temperature
  • High speed fan manual control switch
  • Throttle body coolant bypass
  • z32 TT 16 psi radiator cap instead of the OEM 13psi unit
  • Safety Racing Switch for Torque Converter Lockup Function
  • Safety Racing Switch for Nitrous Activation
  • Safety Racing Switch for Bottle Heater with LED indicator
  • NHRA approved Nitrous Blow Down Tube with 3000psi burst disc
  • Dynotune Automatic Bottle Warmer set to 1050psi
  • Dynotune Bottle Blanket
  • Dynotune Nitrous Filter
  • Shortened 4an Nitrous Feedline (from 16′ to 9′)
  • Bottle warmer pressure switch relocated before main bottle valve
    (to allow operation of pressure switch with closed bottle)

Handling & Braking Mods

  • Koni Adjustable Struts set at 100% firm on front and 60% rear
  • Eibach Pro Kit lowering springs
  • 16.5lb 17″ x 7.5″ Rota Subzero Steel Grey w/ 245/40ZR17 Dunlop Direzza Z1 Star Spec
  • Brembo stock replacement rotors
  • Axxis Metal Master brake pads
  • Techna-Fit Stainless Steel Brake Lines
  • Valvoline Full Synthetic Brake Fluid
  • Energy Suspension Control Arm Bushings (4th gen Maxima)
  • 2.25″ rear coil spring boosters (4 per spring)
  • 1/8″ Metal Cable locking the front spring perches to prevent rise on launch (Currently not installed)

Appearance Mods

  • 5% Limo Tint
  • Removed grill Nissan emblem
  • Painted Brake Calipers
  • NWPEngineering.com decals

Track Video

Member Credit: Eddy

My SPAL fan recently had an issue due to some wiring that made contact with the headers. It caused the two wires coming out of the fan itself to touch and it ended up ruining the fan motor. So this time around I decided to go with the SPAL 14″ 1864 CFM fan. Primarily because its a little smaller in size and give me a little more clearance with my 5thgen Maxima supercharged setup. The CFM is good enough. I also have a small 10″ fan as well (not SPAL) but just as a backup.

Make sure you use a good relay (at least 40 AMP) before connecting directly to your OEM harness. 

Fan Part Number:30102042

Fan Price: Between $120.00 -$140.00

Specs:

  • Model: 30102042
  • Airflow CFM: 1864
  • Profile: High Performance
  • Blade: Curved
  • Push/Pull: Pull
  • Height: 15.04″
  • Depth: 3.45″
  • Width: 14.45″

 

If you don’t use a good relay like the one above, this will happen (Photo Courtesy of Javon Bennet)

Member Credit: xlack

This is from a G37 but the procedure pretty much identical to Nissan Maximas.

OEM Oil Pan completely stripped of silicon residue:

JWT Oil Pan Spacer:

New silicon applied:

Brush used to remove silicon remains:

This bolt has to be bended in order for the oil pan spacer to fit. (guy from 370z forum had it cut off, but is not necessary):

Bolt is knocked back into position:

Member Credit: EddyMaxx

I was shopping around for quality fans for my Nissan Maxima’s (6thgen and 4thgen). The dual Mishimoto fans were not cutting it anymore. And honestly, the Mishimoto fans were really no different than the 14″ generic ones on eBay. I did some research and found a company called SPAL. A fellow member (Javon B.) vouched for these fans confirmed they work very well. All 12-volt puller models, these Extreme Performance Electric Fans offer the most flow and fan area.

My car would overheat at times when going on long cruises with the AC on. I no longer have any cooling issues at all. This fan is very powerful with 2,024 CFM and does the job with just single 16″ Fan. I’m not even using a shroud.

Make sure you use a good relay (at least 40 AMP) before connecting directly to your OEM harness. More info below:

Fan Part Number: 30102049

Fan Price: Between $100.00 -$130.00

Relay Price: It’s about $33 bucks. The part number for it is SPAL-FRH. It’s a 40-amp relay kit. Highly recommended. You can use your own relay brand as well.

Specs:

  • Type: High Performance – 12V Puller – Curved Blade
  • CFM: 2024 cfm
  • Height:16.22″ (412mm)
  • Width: 16.22″ (412mm)
  • Depth: 3.45″   (87.6mm)
  • Model: VA18-AP71/LL-59A
  • Made in Italy

Old 14″ Mishimoto Fans. These were 1300 CFM but certainly didn’t feel like it. 

Comparison of my 16″ SPAL Fan to Mishimoto 14″ Fan

Mounted on `Mishimoto Radiator. It’s literally a perfect fit.

Dimensions

Photo of the SPAL-FRH Relay (40AMP):

If you don’t use a good relay like the one above, this will happen (Photo Courtesy of Javon Bennet)

 

Member Credit: Matt York

I just had the y-pipe installed today (5/2/98), so I have not been able to completely test it out, but my overall impression is very positive.

The installation took 2.5 hours (cusom design/install) and involved the cutting and re-welding of several components of the exhaust system. The O2 sensor was moved, and some new piping was added.

My first impression has been that the engine reves MUCH more smoothly and quickly. It also seems to run smoother at higher RPMs. Noise has not increased very much, but I did notice a difference.

Pictures:

Stock Y-pipe:

You can see that the stock y-pipe has two main sources of restriction. First, the runner from the rear exaust manifold heads towards the FRONT of the car before it enters the y-pipe at a 90 degree angle. Second, the stock y-pipe is made of two halves that are welded together, this does not allow a smooth coupling of the pipes.

Stock Y-pipe Removal:

A Sawzall and a cutting torch were used to remove the heat shields from the stock y-pipe. Then the stock y-pipe, the flex tube, the O2 sensor, and the mounting flange to the rear exhaust manifold were removed.

New Y-pipe Installation:

The rear exhaust manifold mounting flange was saved and welded onto the new y-pipe.

The O2 sensor was re-attached between the flex pipe and the catalytic converter. The O2 sensor was relocated because the flex pipe had to be moved 3″ towards the rear of the car to make room for the y-pipe.

In this picture you can see the new Y-pipe. It is made out of mandrel bent stainless steel.

Finished Installation:

Here you can see the entire system. It is made of larger diameter tubing than the stock system, and the front and rear pipes come together in a less restrictive coupling.

All of the weld joints were painted to prevent rust.

Member Credit: Bryan Tisch

Below are the procedures that I used in performing the replacement of six of my fuel injectors. I put them on this web page to serve as guidance for you, but do not guaranty the results nor do I proclaim this is the correct procedure, though I reference the Nissan Factory Service Manual, hereinafter (“FSM”), throughout. If you have any doubt on your capability in performing this replacement, take your car to a certified mechanic.

What you need :
1. Upper intake manifold gasket; part number 14033-89E00
2. Lower intake manifold gasket; part number 14032-89E01
3. Throttle body gasket; part number 16175-89E10
4. A.A.C valve gasket
5. New / remanufactured fuel injectors 

a. see the picture below, which depicts the two injectors with different connectors.
b. The 90 -91 injectors have the metal clip (smaller) harness connector and the 92-94’s have clip-type (bigger) harness connector.
c. Also, Nissan made both blue and black dot injectors for our cars. I have been told you can use either one, but can’t mix and match. I doubt it would hurt mixing and matching though, just so long as you get the right one for your car. The dot is on the harness connector.
d. I picked up my remanufactured units for $37.95/ injector after the core deposit refund from Direct Automotive Product.

The injector on the left is a 92-94 injector, and the right is a 90-91, and probably an 89 too.

The steps I performed :
1. Release fuel pressure to zero 
a. I did this by unhooking the upper hose from the fuel filter after pulling the fuel pump fuse

2. Separate the accelerator cables from the throttle body. 
a. they easily just slide off. Tilt the butterfly valves back to get them.
b. Remove the cabling and routing from the intake plenum.

3. Remove spark plug wires from spark plugs.

4. Remove the intake elbow leading to the throttle body. 
a. there are three bolts, the middle one is the longer one and routes the spark plug wires.
b. These bolts are torqued at 13 – 16 ft lbs.

For steps 6 – 9, basically remove necessary hoses and vacuum lines so you can free the plenum for removal. I took notes on a few of the items I might have forgotten when putting things back together.

5. Remove the A.A.C. valve 
a. there are four 5 mm hex bolts holding this in. remove the harness connector also.
b. There is an “S” shaped hose connecting the AAC valve to the plenum, remove this also.

6. Disconnect throttle sensor

7. Disconnect the P.C.V. hoses behind the intake plenum

8. Disconnect vacuum hoses under the throttle body, from the E.G.R. control valve, master brake cylinder ,etc.

9. Remove the E.G.R. flare tube 
a. this is held on by two nuts. I think they are 10mm in size.

10. Remove the upper intake plenum 
a. there are eleven six millimeter hex bolts that hold down the plenum at 13 – 16 ft lbs.
b. There is a special torque sequence that I observed in both loosening them and tightening them down. Please refer to the picture at the bottom of the screen for that sequence.

   

Less the spark plug wires and the throttle body (my procedure keeps it attached to the plenum), your engine should look something like the above before taking the lower intake manifold off. Pictures are courtesy of Matt Blehm.

11. Remove the lower intake manifold collector from the engine. 
a. Use the loosening sequence below for taking the manifold off and putting it back on. Again, reference the picture at the bottom of the screen.

12. Remove the engine earth harness from behind the plenum.

13. Remove the fuel injector harness wires 
a. For the 92,93,94’s this is easy, as you just apply pressure on the harness and pull
b. For the 90 and 91’s (and presumably 89’s) there is a metal wire clip that you must pull out or partially out to remove the connector.

14. Remove fuel injector(s) 
a. I used a pair of pliers and gripped them tightly, turning the injectors back and forth before pulling upward. All came out somewhat easily, except my last one.
b. There should be two O rings per injector for the 90 -91 injectors. I am not sure the 92,93,94 injectors have two. The lower O ring will likely stay in the fuel rail hole upon removal of the injector. Just stick your finger in and retrieve it. Be sure to replace with new “O” rings, per the FSM.

15. Replace injector(s) 
a. I applied motor oil to the O rings and carefully inserted the new fuel injector. Instead of just pushing downward immediately, you should turn it back and forth, while applying downward pressure. You will see and feel the injector seat in how it should be. Before replacing, assure that the new ones spec out correctly with regard to resistance. The range of resistance allowed by Nissan is  10 –14 ohms .

16. Clean intake plenum, lower intake manifold, and intake runners. 
a. I used Carb clean and a Valvoline product. I sprayed a good amount of Carb clean down the intake runners and used a cloth to wipe the dirt out. You may want to try a toothbrush.
b. Be sure to completely scrape away all remaining gasket material on both surfaces so as not to allow an intake leak after assembly.

17. Reinstall all parts in reverse order, keeping in mind the torque sequence and use the torque wrench so as to tighten the following to these torque specifications, per the FSM: 
a. plenum hex bolts  13 – 16 ft. lbs .
b. lower intake manifold hex bolts,  13 – 16 ft. lbs .
c. A.A.C valve bolts –  4.6 – 6.1 ft lbs .
d. intake elbow bolts  13 – 16 ft. lbs .

 

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